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Full text of "The Bordner and Burtner families : and their Bortner ancestors in America"

0001198 



OF THE CHUK ,H OF JESUS CHRiST 
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 



^^P 2 1968 



THE BORDMER AND BURTNER FAMILIES 



AND THEIR BORINSR ANCESTORS 



IN AMERICA 



By Howard W, Bordner 



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Iffetshington, D. C. 
1967 




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Artist Dutcliy Page, 
Charlottesville, Va. 



INFORMATION ON COAT -OF -ARMS 

The coat-of-aros, reproduced here, was made available originally by The 
Bortner Association of York County, Pennsylvania. It -was reported to have been 
obtained from the Berlin Museum by Francis Bortner of Maple Shade, New Jersey, 
a descendant of George Bortner of York County, while he was stationed in West 
Germany with the U. S. Army in Europe. 

The information reported to have been obtained with it, stated that Hans 
Bortner and his sons, Hans and Paul, received authority from the German Rmp^^r- 
or, Frederick III, to display this coat-of-arms. It was reported that the 
authority was given in Neustadt on November 11, lU51l. 

There was a city of Neustadt in the Palatinate. Perhaps the authority for 
the coat-of-arms was given there. Or perhaps the authority was actually given 
in the city of "Wiener (Viennese) Neustadt", in which Frederick III had a palace; 
that city is about 30 miles south of Vienna, Austria. 

Obviously, Hans Bortner and his two sons were knights (Ritters). Probably 
they were of the lowest order of nobles; that is, Hans Bortner had no title, 
such as Baron, or the report from the record in the Berlin Museum would have so 
stated. They might have been professional soldiers in the service of a German 
prince. Perhaps, Hans Bortner owned a small landed estate, as a subject of a 
prince, in order to support him and his family - - perhaps 150 or 200 acres. 
If they were landless professional soldiers, when knighthood became obsolete, 
about the year 1500, they (or their descendants) might have been congjelled to 
revert to peasanthood (tenant farmers) in order to make a living (probably free 
peasants). See history of Germany for background. 

The fact that the coat-of-arms is composed of halves of two different coats- 
of-arma indicates, according to the standard practices of heraldry, that the 
left half (on the reader's right side) belonged to the family of Hans Bortner's 
wife; the right half (on the reader's left side) to Hans Bortner himself. 

It is unknown whether Hans Bortner was an ancestor of Balthaser Bortner and 
his descendants in America, named Bordner and Burtner, as well as Bortner. There 
is a high probability that he was not, considering the number of persons by that 
name who must have been living in Germany at that time, even though they may 
have been related. However, this apparently authentic coat-of-arms is probably 
as near to a bona-fide coat-of-arms as will ever be found for Balthaser Bortner 
and his descendants. 



THE BORDNER AND BDRTNER FAMILIES 
AND THEIR BOKTNER ANCESTORS IN AMERICA 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Part 



Frontispiece - Coat-of-arms (see information opposite) 

Foreword 2 

Family history in Pennsylvania 3 
Family emigration in America - 

Southward to Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina 16 

Northward to New York State 16 

Westward to Ohio I7 

Settlers in Indiana I8 

Settlers in Illinois I9 

Settlers in Michigan 20 

Settlers in the Great West 21 

Immigrants in the Philippine Islands 23 

Origin of the family name 2k 

Changes of the family name to "Bordner" and "Burtner" 2^ 

Other Bortner, Bordner, and Eurtner immigrants in America 28 

Background - Early Pennsylvania history 29 

More on the Pennsylvania Dutch 37 

Map of Southeastern Pennsylvania $6 

Map of German States in the Early l8th Century 57 

Brief background of German history $8 

Research methods and sources of data 89 

Explanations of registers of names, and their use 93 

Registers of males and their families - 

Fart A - Bortner ancestors 95 

Part B - Bordner males 97 

Part C - Burtner males 210 
Registers of females and their parents and husbands - 

Part D - Bordner females 262 

Part E - Burtner females 301 

Index of names of sons' wives and daughters* husbands 317 



Ity interest in the history of the Bordner family began as curiosity con- 
cerning my owi lineage. }fy grandfather, who I admired and respected, was left 
an orphan in Western New lork State when he was about three years old. While 
he knew his father's and aether's names and that they were Pennsylvania Dutch, 
he did hot know much else about then. Late in life I undertook to solve this 
JUjrstery by research. 

Eventually I established my Bordner-Bortner lineage back to our mutual 
immigrant ancestor, Balser Bortner. In the process I examined records for all 
of the Bordner and Bortner families for the first four generations. By prac- 
tical experience I became an amateur genealogist. I found genealogical research 
interesting. 

It seemed to me that every family should have a published genealogy which 
would enable any interested member, presently living or to be born in the fu- 
ture, to find his or her family tree and learn something about his or her heri- 
tage. This should be a source of inspiration for many. Nobody had undertaken 
this task for the entire family, but The Bortner Association had published a 
genealogy in 19k9 for one large branch of the family, "George Bortner of Codor- 
us Township, York County, Pennsylvania, and his descendants'*. Ify retirement 
from Cjovemiaent service in 1963 gave me the time to use my acquired skill in 
genealogical research to prepare a genealogy for the rest of the family. And 
80 I undertook the task, presumably for the Bordner family. 

In the Summer of 1965, Mr. Clare S. Burtner of Butler, Pennsylvania, wrote 
to me, after hearing of my work, giving evidence of the descent of the Burtners 
of Western Pennsylvania from our coimon inoigrant ancestor, Balser Bortner. 
Whereupon I extended the project to include the Burtners. 

So here is the genealogy for the Bordners and the Burtners and their Bort- 
ner ancestors in America . All of the descendants of Balser Bortner in America 
who have carried the names, Bordner and Burtner, have been included in the reg- 
isters of names, so far as I have been able to ascertain. There are certainly 
a few omissions, and there is an absence of data for a few, and some probable 
errors, for which I am sorry. I have done my best, within practical limits of 
time and expense. 

This genealogy does not list the thousands of descendants of Bordner and 
Burtner daughters. Their names, of course, were changed when they married, and 
their descendants ought to be listed in other genealogies under their respect- 
ive family names. It would have been impracticable to trace them for this work 
and meet the desired goal of completeness. 

This genealogy does not include the descendants of George Bortner of York 
County, Pennsylvania, except in the few cases of ancestors of Boi*tners who 
changed their name to Burtner and Bordner. The previously-Bentioned work of 
The Bortner Association is sup{K>86d to list all other Bortner family names. 
Between that work and this, all of the descendants of Balser Bortner in America 
who have carried the family name in any form should be listed. 



Historical and background information has been added, which will be of in- 
terest to some. 

Grateful acknowledgment is made for valuable assistance rendered b7 maz^. 
Those who have made exceptional contributions are mentioned in the section, 
"Research methods and sources of data". 

This work is dedicated, as a memorial, to the entire family, living and 
dead and yet to be bom, including wives and husbands from other families. 



Howard W, Bordner 
liashington, D. C. 
September 1, 196? 



FAMTLT mSTQRI IN PENNSYLVANIA. 



Baltbaser Bortner, immigrant, and his family 

Balthaser Bortner arrived in Philadelphia with his family in September, 
1732 on the ship, "Adventure", from Rotterdam, Holland. They had probably 
started from their hone in the Dpper Rhine River Valley in the previous Spring. 
The voyage down the Rhine by barge took five or six weeks; the ocean voyage was 
longer. And there were delays in waiting for a ship at Rotterdam, and after 
taking the ship there was a stopover at Cowes on the Isle of Wight in the Eng- 
lish Channel. Such voyages involved much suffering - - bad food and water, 
overcrowding, coldness, wetness, stench, and much sickness and disease. Some 
died. Survivors had to be strong and healthy as well as courageous. 

Fortunately there is an authentic record in the Pennsylvania Archives of 
how Balthaser Bortner spelled his name - - the Oaths of Allegiance taken on 
September 23, 1732 by all of the family heads of the passengers on the ship, 
"Adventure". On the following page is a reproduction of page 7U from Volume 2 
of "Pennsylvania German Pioneers", by Strassburger and Hinke, published by The 
Pennsylvania German Society, showing facsimile signatures from the original 
Oaths of Allegiance. Of course, these signatures are written in German script 
of the period. That book also listed Hinke 's expert reading of the signatures; 
our ancestor's signature (indicated by an arrow) was stated to be written 
"Balser Bortner". "Balser" was a contraction often made by Germans for the bib- 
lical name "Balthaser". (English: Balthasar or Balthaiar. Hebraic tBelshazaar.) 
Balthaser was the name of one of the three wise men in the bible legend of the 
birth of Christ in Bethlehem. 







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Facsimile signatui*es from Oaths of Allegiance by 
family heads of passengers on ship "Adventure" 

Other records all misspell Balser's name and the names of his vdfe and 
their children who came with him to the New World. The source of all those mis- 
spellings was the ship's passenger-list submitted by the ship's Captain to the 
Colonial authorities. The "Adventure's" passenger-list (which is also preserved 
in the Pennsylvania Archives and reported in "Pennsylvania German Pioneers") 
shows the names of Balser Bortner and his family misspelled as follows: 



Per passenger-list 

Pauley Porterner, age 3U 
Kerreies Porterren, age 37 
Jacob Porttemer, age 10 
Hannah Mela Porterren, age 8 



Actual name (German) 

Balser Bortner 

Maria Elisabetha Bortnerin 

Jacob Bortner 

Anna Maria Barbara Bortnerin 



Misspellings on passenger-lists of European iiomigrants of that tine were common. 
English-speaking people had great difficulty vith German names, but there were 
also errors due to carelessness. 

The given name of Mrs. Balser Bortner (Bortnerin in German) was actually 
'TIaria KLisabetha" (Maiy Elizabeth in English). "Merreles** is not a true nane, 
either in German or English - - that was a crude contraction. There is no 
record of her maiden family-name. 

In a biography of certain descendants of Jacob Bortner, a History of Berks 
County, Pennsylvania, states erroneously that there were two immigrant daughters 
named ''Hannah'* and "Mela". The passenger-list shows that both names applied to 
one daughter. However, there is no known name "Mela'*, either in German or Eng- 
lish. Research indicates that her true name was probably "Anna Maria Barbara". 

All of the 1U5 passengers on the "Adventure" were called "Palatines" in 
the minutes of the Pi*ovincial Council, which recorded the qualification of the 
ship's passengers for entry into the Colony. Only citizens of the Palatinate 
were properly called "Palatines", but that term was applied in Pennsylvania at 
that time to all German-speaking immigrants. While the Bortner s, like the great 
majority of German immigrants of that time, probably caate from the Palatinate, 
they may have come, as some did, from one of the other German States in the 
Upper Rhine Valley — Hesse, Alsace, Baden, Wurttemburg, Bavaria, or Switzer- 
land. Besides our general information on the sources of German immigration at 
that time, we know the following specific facts about the Bortners: 

Apparently the Bortners spoke High German, because the recorded Wills of 
early Bortners were written in High German. This means that they did 
not come from one of the Low Countries or Northern German States. 

The early Bortners were members of both the German Reformed and Lutheran 
churches. 

There is a record in the Berlin Museum of a Coat-of-Arms authorized in 
IhSh by the German Braperor in Neustadt to be displayed by one Hans 
Bortner and his sons, Hans and Paul, presumably for valor in battle. 
Whether Hans Bortner was an ancestor of Balser Bortner, we do not 
know, but the family name was the same. Neustadt was in the Palat- 
inate at that time. 

In addition to such facts as we have. Dr. Fritz Braun recently told one of 
the members of the Bordner family that he thought the Bortners probably came 
from the Palatinate. Dr. Braun is Director of the Heimatstelle Pfalz in Kais- 
erslautem, idiich is understood to be a historical museoa of the Palatinate. 



Wly did this Bortner family come to America? Doubtless they camB, like 
other GercKins caine from the Rhineland in large numbers at that time, to be free 
men, to escape tyraniiy and oppression, to escape the ruins and horrors of fre- 
quent vars, to avoid religious discrimination, and above all, to enjoy all of 
the fruits of their own labor. They were doubtless peasants in the old country, 
and the position of peasants had only slightly improved since the Middle Ages. 
From their standpoint, the political and religious climate of William Penn's 
Colony, as well as its natural soil and climate, were better than in any other 
American Colony. And Penn's agents had long advertised among and solicited 
German protestants to come to his Colony. These sturdy farmers were among the 
best in Europe. They were desirable immigrants, as well as ripe for plucking 
away from their homeland. 

Perhaps Balser Bortner, like many of his contenqwraries, became a "Redenp- 
tioner" (or indentured servant) after his arrival in Philadelphia, in order to 
pay for the passage of his family. Such a period of voluntary servitude might 
have lasted as long as four or five years. In any event, the family was doubt- 
less together on a farm during that period. 

In the year 1738 there is a record of baptism of a daughter, Maria Elisa- 
betha, by the Reverend John Casper Stoever, in the Little Tulpehocken (Christ) 
Church (Evangelical Lutheran). This church, founded in 173U, then housed in a 
log structure, was in the Tulpehocken Settlement, located in the Northeastern 
part of Lancaster County. Later in 1752 most of that area became the Western 
part of the newly-created Berks County. Today this church is located I5 miles 
Southwest of the Village of Bemville in Jefferson Township, Berks County. 

There is no record that Balser Bortner purchased land for a farm from the 
Proprietors, who were then the sons of William Penn. It is possible that he 
settled as a squatter, as many did, on land in the Tulpehocken Settlement owned 
by the Proprietors, and that he cleared the land of trees and built a log cabin 
for a home. However, it is also possible that Balser and his family actually 
lived on one of the two farms covered by early Warrants from the Proprietors - 
- one in the name of his son, Jacob, in Earle Township; the other in the name 
of his son, Peter, in Heidelberg Township. Both of these Warrants are mention- 
ed under the later discussions concerning the respective sons. 

For information on the names of other children bom to Balser and Maria 
Elisabetha Bortner, we are indebted to the compilation and publication by The 
Bortner Association, Glen Rock, Pennsylvania, of a genealogy for their branch 
of the family, "George Bortner of Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania 
and his descendants" (prepared by Charles H. Glatfelter and published in 19U9). 
From that work we find the following additional information: 

Son, George, said by family tradition to have been a babe in his mother's 

arms when the family landed in Philadelphia in 1732. 
Son, Peter, bom in 173li in the Tulpehocken Settlement. 
Daughter, Philippina, born in I736 in the Tulpehocken Settlement. 

That work acknowledged that there may have been other children of whom they 
were uninformed. 



The only additional child of -whom we have knowledge was a aon, Philip 
Jacob, generally called "Philip", There is no record of the year of his birth, 
but it is recorded that he was married in I76O, Hence, he doubtless was bom 
sometime in the middle or late 1730 's or early 17U0*s. Possibly he and Philip- 
pina were twins; she was bom in 1736. 

Balser Bortner died relatively young in 17li7 or 17li8. (I7li7 according to 
tradition among the descendants of his oldest son, Jacob, living in the origin- 
al Tulpehocken area in Berks County 17li8 according to tradition in the fami- 
ly of George, his second son, as stated in the aforementioned work of The Bort- 
ner Association.) When Balser 's wife died is unknown, but it is suspected that 
she died about the same time. 

It is believed that Balser Bortner and his family were the only ones having 
that family name to enter the Pennsylvania Colony. As will be shoim later, a 
majority of their descendants have carried changed spellings of the family name 
— "Bordner" and "Burtner", the former being neatest in number. There is no 
known record of immigrants by the name of either "Bortner", "Bordner", or "Burt- 
ner" entering the original colonies or the United States until the mid-nine- 
teenth century, as will be discussed later. 

Jacob, the oldest son of Balser, and his des cendants 

Before I7I4.O Jacob received a Warrant from the Proprietors to b^y■ I60 acres 
of land in Earle Township, Lancaster County, for about 25 pounds. He larobably 
occupied this land as a tenant on a rental basis while he undertook to pay for 
it, as was the usual custom. In 17ii3 a Patent (Deed) for this property was giv- 
en to somebody else, probably because Jacob had not made the required payments 
to obtain title for himself. These facts are found in the Bureau of Land Rec- 
ords of The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in Harrisburg. In one of these records 
Jacob's name was misspelled "Burtner", but in another place the correct spelling 
was shown. 

Not long thereafter on July lU, 17l|6, Jacob voluntarily enlisted in a force 
of liOO men raised in the Pennsylvania Colony to be enqsloyed, with troops from 
other colonies and British Regulars, to invade Canada. This was during King 
George's War, one of several French and Indian Wars that finally resulted in 
conquering Canada for the British in I76O. We learn from history that this 
Pennsylvania force was raised by the Colonial Governor over the objection of his 
pacifist-minded, Quaker-dominated legislature. The Pennsylvania troops went 
into Winter quarters in Albany in I7I16. They were discharged in October, 17h7, 
the expedition having been laid aside, although the War continued another year. 

One of the auster-roles for this force in the Pennsylvania Archives, listed 
"Jacob Bordner", age 26, in 17U6. Whether or not for the reason of that mis- 
spelling, or possibly because of an accumulation of such misspellings by English- 
speaking officials, Jacob changed the spelling of his family naae to "Bordner**, 
and that spelling has been used by all of his descendants who carry the family 
name. Later some of his nephews and grand-nephews also adopted that spelling. 
Incidentally we also find from the muster-role that Jacob was about two years 
older than stated in the "Adventure's" passenger-list - - not unusual when it 
meant a savings in fare for his ocean passage, 

7 



Jacob vas released from military service Just about the time that his father 
died. Probably he assoned responsibility for his brothers until they became old 
enough to support themselves. His oldest sister, Anna Maria Barbara, married a 
man from York County in 17U8 and went there to live. It is believed that she took 
her tvo sisters with her, as stated later in the narrative relating to their bro- 
ther, George, vho also ifsnt to York County in the late 1750*8. 

Jacob married Sarah Bait, according to records of certain of his Berks Coun- 
ty descendants. This vas doubtless in the early 1750's, because their first 
child, a son, Jacob, vas born October 23, 175U. 

On April 10, 1761 Jacob vas naturalized as a British citizen by the Colonial 
Scheme Court in Philadelphia. Their recoirds shoved his name to be "Jacob Bord- 
ner", and his residence in Berks County. 

Shortly thereafter, on June 20, 1761, Jacob acquired land in Bethel Tovnship, 
Berks County, by Patent (Deed) from the Proprietors, Richard and Thomas Penn, vp- 
on default by the person vho held the Warrant. That property is Just North and 
Bast of the present Village of Bethel; it lies on both sides of the Harrisburg- 
Allentovn Road (U. S. Route 22). It is said to be good "limestone" land, vhich 
vas prized by the Pennsylvania Dutch. It is fairly level land, although the Blue 
Mountain lies vithin sight about five miles North. 

In the 1760's Jacob's Bethel farm vas on the Pennsylvania frontier. Occas- 
ionally settlers in that area vere killed by the Indians. During the French and 
Indian Wars (for vhich a final peace treaty vas not signed until 1763), the 
French incited the Indians to attack the English Colonial frontier settlements. 
There vas a line of forts along the Blue Mountain for protection of the settlers. 
One such fort vas vithin sight of Jacob's house. 

Jacob vas too old for seirvice in the Pennsylvania militia during the Bevo- 
lutionary War, but three of his sons, Jacob Jr., John, and William, vere in the 
militia. Although the record shovs that Jacob Jr. vas fined for skipping mili- 
tia drills during the latter part of the var, it appears that he must have had 
some active service, because he vas voted a pension of $U0 per month in I636 by 
the Pennsylvania Legislature for his var service (only about one year before be 
died). His name is recorded on one of the placques to the memory of Revolution- 
ary War soldiers in the D. A. R. Chapel at Valley Forge. After the var, Jacob 
Jr. held the rank of Lieutenant in the Pennsylvania militia. 

When Jacob Sr. died in 1792, he Willed his l86-acre farm to Jacob Jr., but 
he made a settlement vith his other children by requiring Jacob Jr. to make pay- 
ments to them over a period of years. That vas a normal pattern of handling 
estates in those days. Jacob Sr. vas survived by five sons and one daughter, 
Anna Maria Schneider. Another daughter, Barbara, had died young. 

Jacob's fourth son, Daniel, remained in Bethel Tovnship, but his three 
other sons, John, William, and Peter, vent to lykens Valley in the l^per End of 
Dauphin County to the West. All of them vere farmers. 

Jacob's farm in Bethel Township vas passed on from father to son, generation 
after generation. At one point, it vas divided between tvo sons. One part re- 
mained in the possession of descendants for four genera tiom until 19UU, vhen the 

8 



last Bordner owner died, leaving no children. 

In the 1820'8 one of Daniel Bordner' s grandsons, also named Daniel, moved 
with his family to Hanover Township (the part now in Union Township) in Lebanon 
County, about ten miles West of Bethel. There he established an inn on the road 
between Allentown and Harrisburg. Later one of his sons, Daniel T., established 
a general store there, and the place became known as •^ordnersville". That name 
still appears on sons more-detailed maps — Just East of the Indiantown Gap 
Military Reservation (Pa. Route 93U). The inn was abandoned many years ago, and 
the general store was closed about 1955. Today there are only a few homes there 
at a four-comers; it is not on the main road; and no sign is displayed bearing 
the name "Bordnersville"; no Bordners live there now. 

Several other descendants of Daniel Bordner also settled in Lebanon County 
over the years. Today there are mary of his descendants in that county, and there 
arc none of his descendants who bear the Bordner name remaining in Berks County. 
However, Lebanon County, as well as Berks County, is also the home of sojm of th« 
living descendants of Jacob Bordner Jr. 

In Dauphin County, Just to the West of Lebanon County, there are many living 
descendants of John and William Bordner, who settled in the lykens Valley. Many 
of them came from Powell's Valley (Jefferson Township), where one of William's 
sons, Jacob, settled sometime in the IdliO's. In addition, Dauphin County is the 
home of a few of the descendants of Daniel Bordner of Berks County. There are 
no Bordners living in Dauphin County who are descended from Peter Bordner who 
also settled in the lykens Valley, since all of his sons went to Ohio. 

George, second son of Balser, and his descendants, 

and his sisters, Anna Maria Barbara, Philippina, and Maria Elisabetha 

Anna Maria Barbara, oldest daughter of Balser Bortner, married Henry Kaxm 
"from beyond the Susquehanna" on February 17, 171*8 in Christ Lutheran Church, 
Tulpehocken, according to its records. (Actually the record shows her name only 
as "Maria Barbara Bortner".) This church is located near the present village of 
Stouchsburg in Berks County (not far f rom >fyerstown) . 

AH of the following with respect to the York County Bortners is taken from 
the previously mentioned genealogy, "George Bortner of Codorus Township, York 
County, Pennsylvania", except as otherwise indicated. 

Henry Kann and his wife, "Anna Barbara", lived on a farm in Codorus Town- 
ship, York County. In the early 1750' s, the Kanns apparently took Mrs, Kann's 
sister, Philippina Bortner, into their home, and shortly thereafter Philippina 
married Charles Shaffer of Codorus Township. On September 27, 1759, Charles and 
Philippina Shaffer sold 100 acres of their land to her brother, George Bortner. 
This is the first record that George had moved to that area. Probably after his 
father's death until then, he had remained in Berks County, much of the time 
under the protection of his older brother, Jacob. 

George lived on the farm he acquired in Codorus Township until he died 
(about IBOI). However, when he died, he owned considerably more land. 

George and his two oldest sons, George Jr. and Ludwig, were in the Pennsyl- 
vania militia of York County during the Bevolutionary War, according to records 



in the Pennsylvania Archives. 

George's other sons (making seven in all) in order of their birth, were: 
Philip, John, Peter, Jacob, and Michael. All of the sons, except Philip, lived 
in Tork County all of their lives. Philip went to Washington County in Western 
Pennsylvania. George's five daughters were: Julia, Christina (Hassler), Cathar- 
ine, Elizabeth, and Margaret. 

Repetition of given names in the various Bortner-Bordner-Burtner families 
was coonon. This necessitates great care in distinguishing among those of the 
same given name > - by parentage, by location, or by year of birth* 

With few exceptions, all of George's descendants who carried the family 
name retained the original spelling "Bortner", unlike later descendants of his 
brothers, Jacob, Peter, and Philip. Scceptions have been found as follows: 

George's fourth son, John, settled in Hopewell Township, in Southeastern 
York County, before I8OO. One of his grandsons, also named John, who 
lived there, changed his name to ''Bordner". 

George's fifth son, Peter, moved to Franklin Township in Northern York 
County, about I8OI. This is near the border with Cumberland County, 
which lies on the North. The two oldest of Peter's five sons (George 
and Peter Jr.) changed their name to "Burtner", conforming to a com- 
mon local misspelling. The other three sons retained the original 
spelling but were sometimes known as 'Partner". 

This woric will not list the descendants of George Bortner except those who 
changed their name to "Bordner" and '^urtner" and their other Bortner ancestors. 
For information concerning other descendants, reference should be made to the 
genealogy of "George Bortner of Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania, and 
his descendants". 

Recently it has been reported that one Betsey Bordner married a Michael Low 
(LauX and that they moved from Pennsylvania to North Carolina for a few yeairs 
before finally settling in Tennessee about 1776. She was probably Maria Elisa- 
beths, youngest daughter of Balser Bortner. It has been found that there was a 
Lau family in Codorus Township, York County. Therefore, it is believed that she 
also went there to live with her oldest sister, Mrs. Henry Kann, after their 
parents died. 

Peter, third son of Balser, and his descendants 

Very little is known about Peter Boirtner and his family, compared with our 
knowledge of his brothers' families. 

According to the genealogy of his brother, George of Yoiic County and his 
descendants, Peter was bom in 175U in the Tulpehocken Settlement of Lancaster 
County. He would have been only about 13 years old when his father died. Doubt- 
less be remained in the family, under the protection of his oldest brother, 
Jacob, until the early 1750' s, about the time that Jacob married. It appears 
that Peter was thrown on his own resources quite early in life, and that he was 
probably married before he was 21 (that is, by 1755)* 

10 



The Penngylvania Land Records show that Peter Bortner (also spelled "Bordner") 
received a Warrant from the Proprietors for 176 acres of land in Heidelberg Town- 
ship, lancaster County, under a 1735 Land Survey. Exactly when the Warrant was 
Issued, and upon whose application, we do not know. Possibly his father obtained 
it, because it appears that it was obtained when Peter was very jroung. The rec- 
ords show that the Warrant was outstanding until a Patent (Deed) was issued for 
the property to somebody else on July 11, 1760, when Peter would have been about 
26 years of age. While there is no proof that Peter actually lived on the prop- 
erty, under the usual rental terms while he was atterpting to make the required 
payments, it is believed probable that he did, and that he was the one who ulti- 
mately lost the property for failure to make the required payments (just as his 
older brother, Jacob, apparently lost the property in Earle Township for which he 
had a Warrant in 17U3)« 

Heidelberg Township was divided in half with Berks County when that County 
was established in 1752. It is not known whether the land covered by Peter's 
Warrant was in Heidelberg Township, Lancaster County, or Heidelberg Township, 
Berks County, after 1752 j it might have been in either one. In 1785, Heidel- 
berg Township, remaining in Lancaster County, became a part of the newly created 
Dauphin Countyj still later that area became a part of Lebanon County when it 
was created ire 1813. Today that area is located in Eastern Lebanon County, just 
West of Heidelberg Township, Berks County. 

There is no known record of Peter after 1760. It is suspected that he died 
while still very young. There is no known record of the name of Peter •s wife, 
but it is believed that he must have married, because apparently he had one son, 
and possibly two — Jacob, and possibly John. 

Jacob Bortner was a young farmer in Warwick Township, Lancaster County, for 
the period 1773 through 1782, according to the Tax Lists of the County for that 
period. By a process of deduction, he is believed to have been Peter's son, al- 
though there is no direct evidence of that fact. This deduction is made on the 
following basis: 

(1) Jacob must have been a descendant of Balser, because he was the only 

Bortner registered as an immigrant from the Old World. Jacob's 
location in the 1770 's was corapatible with such a relationship. 

(2) If Jacob was descended from Balser, he must have been a grandson. He 

was bom too late to have been a son. Besides Balser would not 
have had two sons, each named Jacob. 

(3) We know that Jacob was not a son of Balser 's sons, Jacob, George, or 

Philip, because we have authentic records of their sons and have 
traced them. 

(U) The only remaining possibilities were that Jacob was either a son of 
Balser' 3 son, Peter, or some other son of Balser of whom there is 
no record. 



11 



(5) Jacob's location in the 1770 's and his apparent age vere compatible 
■with Peter's age and probably location in I76O, assuming that Jacob 
was Peter's son. 

There were two John Bortners listed in the First U. S. Census of Dauphin 
County ("outside Harrisburgh"- - townships not shown). One was misspelled 
''Bartner"j the other '•Portner". Such misspellings were common. We know that 
one was actually "John Bordner", son of Jacob Bordner of Betiiel Township, Berks 
County. Possibly the other listing represented a duplication, but perhaps not. 
The other listing might have been for a son oi' Peter Bortner. However, there 
is no other known record, including subsequent U. S. Censuses, of a second such 
John Bortner (Bordner or Burtner) of Dauphin County, nor of other Bortners, 
Bordners, or Burtners who night have been his sons or daughters. 

Returning to Peter's apparent son, Jacob, we find from the Pennsylvania Arc- 
hives that he was in the Pennsylvania militia of Lancaster County for the period 
of 1779 to 1782 (the later years of the Revolutionary War) . Me find also from 
the records of the Jerusalem (White Oaks) Reformed Church in Warwick Township, 
the baptism of two sons of Jacob Bortner: Jacob, bom in April 177U> and Simeon, 
born October h} 1782. Subsequent records show that the latter was actually 
named "Samuel"; either the baptism record was erroneous, or his name was changed 
after baptism. 

There is no known record of Jacob and his family after 1782 until the I8OO 
Census showed that he and his family were then located in East Pennsborough 
Township, Cumberland County, which is not far from Harrisburg, West of the Sus- 
quehanna River. They were not listed in the First U. S. Census of 1790. Pos- 
sibly in 1790 they were in the process of iiKiving from their first home in Lan- 
caster County to their new home in Cumberland County; that would explain why 
they were not listed in the Census of that year. 

The Will of this Jacob Bortner on file in Carlisle, the County Seat of Cum- 
berland County, shows that he died near the end of the year l8l5 in East Penns- 
borough Township, and his survivors were his wife. Eve (Eva); his three sons, 
George, Jacob, and Samuel; and his two daughters, Elizabeth (Bretz) and Barbara 
(Linn). Samuel was given his father's land of appro:ciraately ll;0 acres; the 
others were said to be provided for, principally during Jacob's lifetime. 

George, oldest son of Jacob, was a famKr in Cuiriberland County until 1828, 
when he moved with his wife and most of his sons and daughters to I'bntgomery 
County, Ohio. Records in both counties show that George's name was frequently 
misspelled "Burtner" by local English-speaking officials and neighbors, but 
that he, himself, did not accept that spelling. However, his sons, Henry, George 
Otterbein, Jacob, John, and Joseph, changed the spelling of their family name, 
conforming to the common misspelling. 

Jacob Jr., second son of Jacob and also a farmer, moved about I803 from 
Cumberland County to Beaver Township, Northumberland County. That township be- 
came part of the new Union County in I813, and the still later Snyder County, 
long after Jacob's death in the late 1820 's (which explains where it is now 
located). The Junior Jacob's sons, Jacob (III), George, and Benjamin, changed 
the spelling of their family name to "Bordner", the most common misspelling in 
that area. 

12 



Samuel, third and youngest son of Jacob Sr. of Cumberland County, appar- 
ently lived with his family on his father's farm all of his life. In his later 
years the farm was located in Silver Spring Tovmship, which was split off from 
East Pennsborough Township. Samuel, himself, changed his name to "Burtner", and 
all of his descendants who have carried the family nane, have continued that 
spelling. 

It is an interesting fact that many of the "Burtner" descendants of Jacob 
Bortner of Cumberland County have been ministers of the gospel — principally 
in the Iftiited Brethren Church. 

Philip, fourth and youngest son of Balser, and his descendants 

There is no direct evidence that Philip Bortner was a son of Balser and 
I«Iaria Elisabetha Bortner. The genealogy, "George Bortner of Codorus Township, 
York County, Pennsylvania, and his descendants", does not name Philip as one of 
their sons, although it names all of their other known children. However, it 
does state that there may have been other children of whom the authors had no 
knowledge. There are good and satisfactory reasons for concluding that Philip 
was one of their sons - - namely: 

(1) Philip must have been a descendant of Balser, because he was the only 
Bortner registered as an immigrant from the Old Vforld. 

(2) Philip was not a son of Balser 's son, Jacob, because we have authentic 
records of his sons and have traced them. And Philip could not have 
been a son of Balser 's sons, George or Peter, because neither one was 
enough older than Philip to be his father. 

(3) Both Philip's age and location at the time of his marriage and birth 
of his three oldest sons are compatible with the assunq^tion that he 
was Balser 's son. Philip lived in Bethel Township, Berks County, which 
was the home of Jacob, oldest son of Balser. 

(U) Philip's youngest son was named "Balser". He was the only other 
"Balser Bortner" of whom there is a record. It may easily be assumed 
that he was a namesake for his grandfather. 

The first known record of "Phillip Jacob Bortner" is that of his marriage 
to Maria Elisabetha Velt (both of Bethel Township, Berks County) on August 9, 
1760 by the Reverend John Casper Stoever (whD has been mentioned previously). 
Reverend Stoever 's records also show that he had baptized Maria Elisabetha Velt 
shortly after her birth on September k, 17U1. It is reasonable to assume that 
Philip was not much older than his wife. 

It is probable that Philip had been brought up, like his brothers, George 
and Peter, in Bethel Township (or nearby) under the protection of their oldest 
brother, Jacob, after their father died in nhl or 17l;8. 

Rev. Stoever 's records also show the baptism of the three oldest sons of 
"Phillip Jacob" and Maria Elisabetha Bortner of Bethel Township, as follows: 

13 



Henry (Heinrich), born April 2h, 1761 

John George, born February 1, 1763 (later known siii?)ly as "George") 

John (Johannes), born June 3, 1765 

During the Revolutionary War Philip vas in the same Battalion of the Penn- 
sylvania militia of Berks County as his brother's son, Jacob Jr., but it is un- 
known whether he was in active service. Like Jacob Jr., he was fined during the 
later years of the war for not attending militia drills. 

In 1779 Philip had moved his family to a farm in Pine Grove Township, Berks 
County, according to the Tax Lists of that township, preserved in the Pennsyl- 
vania Archives. Pine Grove Township is just North of Bethel Township, across 
the Blue Mountain. It is now located in Southern Schuylkill County. 

Philip died at a relatively early age in 1786. The records of the Orphans' 
Court of Berks County show that he was survived by his wife, '•Elizabeth'*, and 
the following children: Henry, George, John, Philip Jr., Elizabeth, Hannah, 
Juliana, Balser, Kagdalena, and Christina. The Court found that it would be im- 
practical to divide Philip's 2G0-acre plantation between the heirs, and there- 
fore it authorized the sale of the property to the oldest son, Henry, for 165 
pounds in gold - - the value appraised by an independent board for the Court. 

Apparently Henry never lived on the Pine Grove farm after he bought it, 
but permitted his brother, George, to live on it. At any rate, it appears from 
the U. S. Census records of 1790 that George was then living there with his wife, 
mother, and one of his younger brothers (probably John, who was still unmarried), 
while Henry and his family, with his younger brother, Balser, and five young 
sisters, were living on a farm in Tulpehocken Township, Berks County (which lies 
Southeast of Bethel Township). 

Sometime in the 1790's all of Philip's sons left Berks County. 

Henry and his family, with his younger brother, Balser, and remaining un- 
married sisters, went West about 30 miles to Stone Valley, an area now located 
in Lower Hahanoy Township in Southwestern Northumberland County. It was just 
East of the Susquehanna River and North of Mount Mahantango, which forms the 
boundary between Northumberland and Dauphin Counties. Just South of that moun- 
tain in the lykens Valley of Dauphin County were the farms of John, Wi]J.iam, 
and Peter Bordner, sons of Henry's l&icle Jacob. These two areas were connected 
by a pass through Mount Mahantango j in that pass is now the Village of Pillow 
(formerly Uniontown) . Both Henry and Balser changed the spelling of their fam- 
ily name to ••Bordner", following the spelling adopted by their Uncle Jacob and 
retained by his sons. 

Henry had large landholdings in Stone Valley (approximately 500 acres); 
he was Captain of the local militia company, and a trustee of the Reformed 
Church congregation. Despite his success in Stone Valley, about I8l0, when he 
vas almost 50 years old, Henry moved with his large family to Stark County, 
Ohio, an area newly opened up for ssttlement. Apparently he gave a farm to 
his brother, Balser, who remained in Stone Valley, and sold the rest of his 
holdings there . Henry must have been a man of great strength, energy, and 

lU 



initiative, and possessed of the true pioneer spirit to undertake twice all 
of the hardships of clearing virgin woodland for fanning and building a new 
home and farm buildings. Perhaps he was land-hungry, as many pioneers were. 
Yet he appeared to have been generous to his brothers and sisters, and to 
have provided well for his children. 

Today there are many descendants of Balser Bordner in Northumberland 
County and in the adjoining Snyder County; a few of his descendants are also 
living in the adjoining Dauphin and Montour Counties. 

Henry's brothers, George, John, and Philip Jr., cross the Allegheny 
Mountains sometime in the 1790' s and went to farms in Western Pennsylvania 
not far f i?om Pittsburgh. 

Philip Jr. apparently went to that area first. Before 1800 he had mar- 
ried there and settled on a fann on Little Bull Creek in Deer Township (now 
in Harrison Township) in Northern Allegheny County. He also owned and oper- 
ated a mill there. In 1821 he finished construction of a large stone house 
- - a three-year project. Part of the farm and the stone house have been in 
possession of his descendants until recently (1966). 

By the year 1800, George and his wife were on a farm in Hempfield Town- 
ship, Westmoreland County, and John and his family were on a farm in Pitt 
Township, Allegheny County - - both East of Pittsburgh. However, sometime 
before I8l0, John and his family moved to a farm in Buffalo Township (now in 
Clinton Township) in i^outhem Butler County (just North of where Philip Jr. 
lived). And about I8l0, George and his wife went West with his brother, 
Henry and family, to Stark County, Ohio . 

John and Philip Jr. encountered the usual difficulty with spelling their 
family name. It was most often misspelled "Bourtner" in the public records, 
but it was sometimes misspelled "Burtner". John's sons who siurvived him, the 
sons of John's sons who had died earlier, and all of Philip's sons, changed 
the spelling of their family name to "Burtner". Although George was sometimes 
known as "Bordner", apparently he made no change in the spelling of his family 
name, but that made little difference, because he alone, of all the Bortner 
males of his time, had no children to carry the family name forward. 

Today there are no descendants of John Bortner bearing the Burtner name 
who live in Butler County. They are scattered widely, but there are some who 
live in adjoining counties. Many of Philip Bortner' s descendants, who bear 
the Burtner name, still live in Allegheny County, Butler County, and other 
adjoining counties. 



15 



FAMUr BQGRATION IN AMERICA 

Soathward to Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina 

In I82U, Henry Burtner, the oldest son of George Bortner of Cumberland Coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, before his father and most of his family went to Montgomery 
County, Ohio, married a girl from Washington County, Maryland, and nent to live 
on a farm near Leitersburg, East of Hagerstown, in the Northern part of that Coun- 
ty. He became a circuit-riding minister in the then nev United Brethren Church 
and served a number of churches betveen Hagerstown and Staunton, Virginia, in the 
Great Valley vhich lies on the Eastern side of the main Appalachian range. This 
valley is called the Cumberland Valley in Pennsylvania and Maryland, but in Vir- 
ginia it is called the Valley of Virginia (or Shenandoah Valley). Mai^ Pennsyl- 
vania Dutch settled in that area, commencing before the Revolutionary War. About 
I8U2, the Reverend Henry Burtner selected and acquired a farm near Dayton, Vir- 
ginia, in the Shenandoah Valley (Rockingham County) and moved his family there. 

During the Civil War, three of Henry's sons served briefly in the Virginia 
militia on the side of the Confederacy — Solcmon, Ezra, and George Peter. In 
I86U, the Union Amy destroyed crops and fa mi buildings and equipment throughout 
the Shenandoah Valley, vhich had served as the bread-basket of the Confederacy. 
After that disaster, Ezra moved with his family back to Washington County, Mary- 
land, to a farm near Hagerstovn inherited by his second wife. 

Henry Burtner 's fourth son, William Henry, also became a minister in the 
Itolted Brethren Church, as well as a fanner, in Rockingham County, Virginia. In 
turn, four of his eight sons became ministers - - three in the Ihiited Brethren 
Church; one in the Congregatlozial Church in Nev England. Ezra Burtner of Wash- 
ington Coun'fy, Maryland, also had tvo sons who became ministers in the United 
Brethren Church. 

One of Ezra Burtner' s sons, David Henry, went farther down the Great Valley 
to North Carolina about I890, where in Greensboro he founded a retail furniture 
business. It is still owned and operated by his descendants. 

Northward to New York State ; 

About 1829 most of the family of Jacob Bortner (or Bordner) of Union Cotmty, 
Pennsylvania, went North to the Town of Fayette in Seneca County, New York, just 
South of Seneca Falls. Possibly Jacob himself had Just died before the move, but 
he may have died soon afterwards. Two of his sons, George and Benjamin Bordner, 
lived on farms in that township. However, in the l850's George and his family 
went West to Stephenson County, Illinois, following his older brother, Jacob 
Bordner of Union County and Centre County, Pennsylvania. 

Another Jacob Bordner, a butcher, also moved in the late 1820' s to Williams- 
Tille,New York, which is now a suburb of Buffalo. He was an elder son of Balser 
Bordner of Stone Valley in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. However, none of 
his children remained in New York State. About 1855, after the death of their 
parents, they all went to St. Joseph County, Michigan. 



16 



Westward to Ohio ; 

As vas true for the Pennsylvania Dutcsh as a whole, there vere many n»re 
Bordners and Burtners who went Vfest than those who went North or South. 

Eastern Ohio was opened for settlement between I8OO and I8IO, following 
several years of warfare with the Indians and obtaining a clear title to the 
area by Treaty with the Indians. The first Bordners to settle in Ohio were two 
sons of Philip Bortner of Berks County, Pennsylvania - - Henry Bordner from Stone 
Valley, Northumberland County, and George Bortner from Westmoreland County. Th^ 
went with their families to Canton Township in Stark County, Ohio about I8IO. 
Apparently they purchased their farms from sp>eculators who had bought the land 
shortly before I8IO from the Federal Government for $2 an acre. There is no in- 
formation available as to the prices that Henry and George paid. In l8lii, a local 
history records that a nujiiber of settlers in the Southern half of Canton Township 
met at the home of Henry Bordner and took action which led to separation of their 
locality from Canton Township; the new township became Pike Township. George and 
his wife lived a short distance North in Canton Township after the subdivision. 

In the 1820 's all of the sons of the deceased Peter Bordner of lykens Valley 
in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, followed Henry Bordner to Ohio, one by one. 
According to a story told by his descendants, the first one to go was young John 
P. Bordner, then in his teens. He went all the way on foot, carrying his rifle 
and a bundle of clothes, and acconqsanied by his dog. As previously mentioned, 
Henry Bordner was his father's first cousin and had been a longtime neighbor just 
across Mount Mahantango, which was on the North side of the lykens Valley. Within 
two years of his arrival and going to work on the farm of Henry Bordner, John P. 
married his youngest daughter, Sarah. Henry probably gave them their first farm, 
but eventually John P. acquired two other farms. He remained in that area with 
his family all of his life, although Henry and most of the other Bordners moved 
away. 

Also in the 1820 's, John P. Bordner's brothers, Philip, Jacob, and Michael, 
followed him to Pike Township, Stark County, and their oldest brother, Peter Jr., 
and his family, followed but went on to Hopewell Township, Licking County, which 
is not far flrom Columbus. Michael soon married and went farther West to a farm 
near Portage in Wood County, South of Toledo — an area that was then low and 
marshy. After drainage, that area was very fertile. 

Sometime in the 1820 »s, Henry Bordner 's oldest son, George, moved farther 
West with his family to Knox County, Ohio, commencing an exodus of all of Henry's 
sons from Stark County, accept his young^t son, Henry Jr. George moved again to 
Chatfield Township, Crawford County, about I832. Soon thereafter he was followed 
by his father, Henry (then a widower), his brothers, John, Philip, and Jacob, and 
his cousin, Jacob (brother of John P.), with their families. Henry died there in 
18U5 in his 85th year, after an exceptionally vigorous, venturesome, and success- 
ful life. 

Sometime in the l850*s, Henry's sons, George and John, and cousin, Jacob, 
left Crawford County with their families, leaving only his sons, Philip and Jacob, 
and their families in Crawford County. George moved to a farm near Montpelier in 

17 



Williams County, vhich is in the extrene Northuest comer of Ohio. John moved to 
a farm in Flatrock Township, Henry County; and cousin, Jacob, moved to a fara in 
Wood County, near his brother, Michael. 

John Bordner of Henry County had five sons, of idioo only one, David M., re- 
mained in Henry County. One by one, the others followed their Uncle George to 
Williams County - - Jacob, William, Daniel, and Henry. However, William and Dan- 
iel did not remain there - - William vent to a farm in Hanover Township in Jackson 
County, Michigan, and Daniel to a farm near Clinton in De Witt County, Illinois. 

From another branch of the faislly, George Bortner of Ctmberland County, Penn- 
sylvania moved with most of his family to Dayton Township in Montgomery County, 
Ohio in 1826, as previously related. Their farm was about five miles North of 
the City of Dayton, near the present village of Shlloh. That area is now in Har- 
rison Township. George was generally known to his neighbors as "George Buirtner 
Sr."; his second son, "George Burtner Jr.**, although be was actually named 
"George Otterbein". While George Sr. did not actually change his name to "Burt- 
ner", all of his children did. George Sr. died in 1833, and his sons moved away 
a few years later. George Otterbein and John Bortner went to Illinois about iSUii. 
About the same time Jacob and Joseph Burtner soved to farms in Lanier Township, 
in nearby Preble County. Jacob returned to Montgomery County in the early l860's 
(in German Township, South of Dayton), azid Joseph retired in Anderson, Indiana 
sometime in the l870's. Their mother, Catharine, lived with one or the other of 
her children in Ohio, until she died in l861i in the home of her son, Jacob. 

Other Burtners and Bordners who went to Ohio froa Pennsylvania at a later 
time included the following: 

Peter Burtner, a cairpenter and grandson of John Bortner (Burtner) of Butler 
County, Pennsylvania, went to Cincinnati about 18U0. 

William Bordner, a farmer and grandson of Daniel Bordner of Berks County, 
Pennsylvania, went to Stark County, Ohio about 1850, where be lived 
about ten years before going to Whitley County, Indiana. 

William Henry Bordner, a railroad clerk and a great grcmdson of Daniel 
Bordner of Berks County, lived in Akron, Ohio, among other places, in 
the late ISTO's and the l880's. 

Settlers in Indiana 

In 1851 Philip Bordner, then a widower, aoved with three of his sons, Jona- 
than, Daniel, and Solomon, to the area near Butler in De Kalb County, Indiana, 
which is in the extreiM Morthsastem part of the State. Philip, who bad lived in 
Stark and Wayne Counties, Ohio, was the brother of John P. Bordner of Stark Coun- 
ty; both had come from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania to Ohio in the 1820*8. 

A few years later, John Washington Bordner, a son of John P. Bordner, Bioved 
with his family from Stark County, Ohio to a fani near Ligonier, Noble County, In 
Northern Indiana. He was a carpenter as well as a faraer. 



16 



Sometime in the l860»s, William Bordner (originally from Pennsylvania) who 
had iiB fried and farmed for a few years in Stark County, Ohio, moved to a farm 
near Columbia City, Whitley County, also in Northern Indiana. 

Another Ohioan to move to Indiana in the l860's was Levi Bordner, adopted 
son of Henry Bordner Jr. of Stark County, Ohio. He and his family lived in Elk- 
hart and Kosciusko Counties in Northern Indiana. 

In the I860's, Isaac Bordner, a son of Balser Bordner of Stone Valley, North- 
umberland County, Pennsylvania, moved with his family from that area to a farm 
near Bristol in Elkhart County. 

Also in the l860's, Augustus S. Bordner, a young school-teacher from Berks 
County, Pennsylvania, came to Brookston in White County in Northwestern Indiana. 
He was a grandson of Jacob Bordner (III), one of those in the line who owned the 
ancestral homestead of Jacob Bordner (I) in Berks County. Gus was soon joined 
there by his brother, Israel (or Isaac), and they founded a retail lumber busi- 
ness in Brookston. Later Israel withdrew from the lumber business and practiced 
the carpentry trade. 

Much later, about 1900, Andrew Jacob Bordner, a farmer, came to Huntington 
County, Indiana, not far from Fort Wayne. He was a son of Jacob Bordner of Craw- 
ford County, OMo, and had lived also in Seneca and Van Wert Counties in Ohio. 

Also about 1900, Elsworth A. Bordner came to a farm in De Kalb County in 
Northeastern Indiana. He was born in Henry County, Ohio, a grandson of Jacob 
Bordner of Crawford County. At one time, he was a County Commissioner of De 
Kalb County. 

There were no Burtners who settled permanently in Indiana until about I9OO. 
Then two families from Illinois (descendants of George Otterbein Burtner) came 
to farms in the area near Lebanon. These were the families of George Henry and 
Marion Andrei^i Burtner. Today there are many of their descendants around Indian- 
apolis, Lebanon, Muncie, and Marion. 

I Settlers in Illinois t 

Central and Northern Illinois began to be settled at a rapid rate commencing 
about I8U0. In I8U0, among the early pioneers, Jonathan Bordner settled on a 
farm in Lewistown Township, Fulton County, in Central Illinois. Although he was 
bom in Pennsylvania, he had been brought as a child about 1825 to Licking County, 
Ohio by his father, Peter Bordner Jr. of lykens Valley, Dauphin County. Six 
years later, Peter's second son, Moses, and ten years later, his third son, George 
Washington, also came from Licking County, Ohio and settled on farms in Lewistown 
Township, Fulton County. Finally in 185U, Peter himself, with the rest of his 
family, including his two youngest sons, Peter Jr. and Alfred, moved to Lewistown 
Township. Peter died there in I88I, at the unusual old age of 89, after a life of 
hard work in pioneering twice. His wife, Christiana (or Christina) lived to be 
more than a hundred. They have had many descendants. 



19 



In l8Ui, George Otterbein Burtner and his brother, the Heverend John Burtner, 
moved to Central Eastern Illinois from Montgomery County, Ohio. Apparently they 
lived temporarily in Clark County, but by 1850, George and his family had settled 
permanently on a farm in Coles County, South of Ashmore and West of Westfield. 
George was a pioneer in developing fruit orchards and a tailor, as well as a farm- 
er. He also gave considerable support to the establishment of the United Brethren 
Church in that part of Illinois. He died young of the Cholera, leaving a large 
family. The Reverend John Burtner followed in the footsteps of his oldest brother, 
the Reverend Henry Burtner of Maryland and Virginia, in becoming a minister in the 
United Brethren Church. He served a number of congregations in Eastern Illinois 
and Western Indiana. About I87O he settled finally with his family in Vermillion, 
in Edgar County, Illinois, near Douglas and Champaign Counties, where the widow 
and most of the sons and daughters of his brother, George, then lived. His own 
descendants, much fewer in number, have lived principally in California. 

In the late iBl^O's, Jacob Bordner (III) of Union County, Pennsylvania moved 
with his family to a farm in Buckeye Township (now in Dakota Township) near Free- 
port in Stephenson County, in Northern Illinois. Although Jacob Bordner was a 
first cousin of George Otterbein and the Rev. John Burtner, he probably never 
knew then, and they probably knew nothing about his settlement in Illinois. About 
1852, Jacob's brother, George Bordner and his oldest son, David, with their fami- 
lies, also moved to farms in the same locality from Seneca County, New York State, 
where they had lived since about 1829. 

About i860, Daniel Bordner, settled with his family on a farm near Clinton, 
De Witt County, in Eastern Illinois. He was a son of John Bordner of Henry Coun- 
ty, Ohio, but apparently had lived briefly in Williams County, Ohio before moving 
to Illinois. 

Much later, in 188?, Harry (Henry) C. Bordner came to Chicago, Illinois with 
his family from Newport in Perry County, Pennsylvania. He was a grandson of Wil- 
liam Bordner, an early settler in the lykens Valley, Dauphin County. 

Settlers in Michigan ; 

About 1855 George and Augustus (Gus) Bordner, stonemasons, settled in the 
new village of Burr Oak, St. Joseph County, in Southern Michigan, with their fam- 
ilies and orphaned sisters and brothers, William, Henry Harrison, and Benjamin 
Franklin. They came from Williamsville, New York, the survivors of Jacob Bordner, 
an elder son of Balser Bordner of Stone Valley, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

Later settlers in Mchigan included the following and their families; 

VSilo A. Bordner, onetime mei±>er of a Michigan regiment during the Civil War, 
came to Ionia, Michigan about I87O from Ohio. He was a son of Jacob 
Bordner of Crawford County, Ohio. 

William Bordner moved to a farm in Hanover Township, Jackson County, from 
Williards County, Ohio in the late l870's. He was a son of John Bordner 
of Henry County, Ohio. 

20 



i 



David R. Bordner moved to a farm in Colfax Township, Huron County (near 
Bay City) about 1880, from the likens Valley in Dauphin County, Penn- 
sylvania. He was a great grandson of John Bordner, an early settler 
in the likens Valley. 

Isaac (or Isaiah) Bordner moved to a farm near Midland in Midland County 
from Wood County, Ohio in 1903. He was a son of Jacob Bordner of Wood 
County who had also- lived in Stark and Crawford Counties, in Ohio, after 
coming from the lykens Valley in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania in the 1820'b. 

Settlers in the Great West ; 

Among the Bordners and Burtners, the only known emigrant to California during 
the Gold Rush was Jacob Bordner of Berks County, Pennsylvania, grandson of Daniel 
Bordner. He went to California in 185L. There is no known additional information 
concerning him, and no descendants have been found. 

Otherwise, the first known Burtners or Bordners to move West of the Mississippi 
River were Reuben and Daniel Burtner, sons of Samuel Burtner of Cuniserland County, 
Pennsylvania. They went to Muscatine, Iowa in the mid iS^O's. In the l870's, 
Reuben and his family went to Nebraska, but by I88O they were living on a ranch near 
Ellsworth, Kansas. Daniel Burtner and his family went back to Pennsylvania for 
several years, but eventually returned to Muscatine. 

There were no other known Burtners or Bordners West of the Mississippi River 
before the Civil War. However, there were not many settlers in the Plains and 
Rocky Mountain States before the Civil War. Settlers in Kansas and Nebraska up to 
about 1890, and in Colorado, Utah, and Montana up to the early 1900' s, may proper- 
ly be considered to have been pioneers. 

Following is a chronological list of the Bordners and Burtners who went West 
beyond the Mississippi after the Civil War up to the early 1900 's. Since that 
time it has become common to move around, and migration is not at all comparable to 
what it used to be. Hence, more recent movements are not Hated. 

Henry Bordner, son of Jacob Bordner of Stephenson County, Illinois to Jesup, 
Iowa (Buchanan County) about I869. 

Andrew Burtner, son of John Bortner of Butler County, Pennsylvania to Moni- 
teau County, Missouri about I87O, following several years in Indiana. 

Benjamin Franklin Bordner, son of Philip Bordner of Crawford County, Ohio, 
to near Circleville, Kansas, in early l870's. 

Jonathan Bordner, son of Philip Bordner of De Kalb County, Indiana, to Kan- 
sas in early l870's. However, he returned to De Kalb County before I88O. 

Andrew Burtner, grandson of John Bortner of Butler County, Pennsylvania to 
Ifcrgan County, Missouri about 1875. However, all except one of his sons 
returned to Western Pennsylvania. . -.on^ 

Henry Harrison Bordner of Burr Oak, Michigan to near Monona, Iowa in 1076. 

Reverend George Washington Burtner, son of the Reverend John Burtner of 
Edgar County, Illinois, to California in mid l870's. 

21 



Continuation of list from preceding page: 

Edward H. Bordner, great grandson of Jacob Bordner Jr. of Berks County, 
Pennsylvania, to Washington County, Kansas in late iByO's. 

James Burtner, great grandson of John Bortner of Butler County, Pennsyl- 
vania to near Manhattan, Kansas about 1879. 

George I. Bordner, great grandson of John Bordner of Dauphin County, Penn- 
sylvania, to Council Grove, Kansas about I883. 

Benjamin Franklin Burtner, grandson of George Otterbein Burtner of Illinois 
to Rockwall, Texas in I88U. 

William S, Bordner, great grandson of Balser Bordner of Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania, to Pilger, Nebraska about I88U. 

George Henry Burtner, grandson of George Otterbein Burtner of Illinois, to 
near Pleasanton, Kansas in I888. However, he returned to Illinois in 1902. 

Ruallen Bordner, great grandson of Daniel Bordner of Berics County, Pennsyl- 
vania, went West sometime in l880's, but disappeared. 

Alfred Bordner, son of Jonathan Bordner of Fulton County, Illinois, to Taylor 
County, Iowa about I89O. 

Albert Lee, Charles W., and John W. Bordner, sons of Peter Bordner Jr. of 
Fulton County, Illinois to Texas about I89O. 

Charles A. Bordner, son of Alfred Bordner of Fulton County, Illinois to 
Erath County, Texas in the l890's. 

William Boirlner, son of William Bordner of Columbia County, Indiana to 
Denver, Colorado about 1890. 

Frank and Oliver Bordner, grandsor*of Balser Bortner of Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania to Nebraska about 1892. 

Isaac and Samuel T. Bordner, great grandsons of Balser Bordner of Northumber- 
land County, Pennsylvania to Pilger, Nebraska in the early l890's. 

William H. Bordner, son of Daniel Bordner of De Witt County, Illinois, to 
Grand Island, Nebraska in the l890's. 

Joseph F. Bordner, son of John P. Bordner of Stark County, Ohio, to Wichita, 
Kansas in the l890's. 

Henry Bordner, son of Philip Bordner of Crawford County, Ohio, to San Fran- 
cisco, California about 1892. 

Fremont Charles Bordner, great grandson of Daniel Bordner of Berks County, 
Pennsylvania, to San Francisco, California in the 1890 's. 

Isaac Bordner, son of Philip Bordner of Crawford County, Ohio to Pasadena, 
California in the late 1890 's. 

Isaac Andrew Bordner, grandson of Philip Bordner of Crawford County, Ohio, 
to Los Angeles area in the late l890's. 

William B. Burtner, son of Andrew Burtner of Morgan County, Missouri, to 
near Hooper, Colorado, about 1900. 

Janes Henry Burtner, son of Reverend John Burtner of Illinois, to California 
about 1900. 

Reverend Mark\%'ood Monroe Burtner, son of Ezra Burtner of Washington County, 
Maryland, to Washington and Oregon about 1900 from Pennsylvania. 

William T. Hamilton Burtner, son of Ezra Burtner of VJashington County, 
Maryland, to San Francisco about 1900. 

Jacob Herman (Herman Jacob) Burtner, grandson of Philip Bortner of Allegheny 
County, Pennsylvania to near Carle ton, Nebraska about 1900. 

22 



-; 



t. 



Continuation of list from preceding page: 

AlLert W. Bordner, grandson of John P. Bordner of Stark County, OhiOj to 

Oklahoma, soon after 1900. 
Irving J. Bordner, grandson of John P, Bordner of Stark County, Ohio, to 

Indio, California, soon after 1900. 
Marion Bordner, son of George Washington Bordner of Fulton County, Illinois, 

to Bennett, Colorado about 190^. 
Charles E. Bordner, son of Jonathan Bordner of De Kalb County, Indiana to 

Utah in early 1900 's. 
William W. Bordner, son of Jonathan Bordner of De Kalb County, Indiana to 

Butte, Montana in early 1900 's. 
Henry Harrison Burtner, great grandson of John Bortner of Butler County, 

Pennsylvania to Oklahoma in early 1900 's. 
Oscar F. and Jay Bordner, sons of Iferry (Henry) C. Bordner, from Chicago, 

Illinois to Waterloo, Iowa (vith mother) in early 1900's. Later Oscar F. 

lived in New Mexico and California. 
Andrew C. Burtner, son of Andrew Burtner of Moniteau County, Mssouri, to 

Lakeside, California about 1900. 
Stanton W. Bordner, great great grandson of Jacob Bordner Jr. of Berks County, 

Pennsylvania to Pittsburg, California, in early 1900's. 
William Burtner, son of Janes Burtner of I4anhattan, Kansas, to Colorado in 1909. 
Thomas Jefferson Burtner, grandson of George Otterbein Burtner of Illinois to 

near Miles City, Montana in 1912. However, he returned to Illinois in 1930, 



Immigrants to the Philippine Islands ; 

Immediately after the Spanish -American War, John Harvey Bordner, a son of 
William Henry Bordner of Pennsylvania and Ohio, was with the U. S. Army stationed 
in the newly-won Philippine Islands. After his enlistmentexpired, he remained there 
and settled with his Filipino wife on a coconut-and-rice plantation near Zamboanga 
City. Upon his death in 196U, he had many surviving descendants there. 

In 1902, about the sane time, Harvey Albert Bordner, a great great grandson 
of Jacob Bordner Jr. of Berks County, Pennsylvania, went to the Philippine Islands 
to teach in the public schools. He remained there for 3U years until his retire- 
ment in 1936, when he returned with his wife to live in Indianapolis. He was 
Superintendent of Schools in the City of Manila for the last 18 years of residence. 



23 



ORIGIN GF THB FAMHI NAME 

Authorities tell us that family names began to be used in Western Europe and 
England about the 12th century, and that the original purpose "was to provide a 
n^ans for distinguishing within a coramunity between those who had the same Christ- 
ian name. Far example, there might be several "Johns" in a community. To identify 
one, he might be called "John who lives near the Woods" j to identify another, he 
might be called "John the Smith" (blacksmith). The next steps were to shorten and 
formalize the descriptive suffix (for example, simply "Woods" and "Smith"), and to 
give the same descriptive name to a man's children, to his sons' children, and so 
on. The old practice was preserved of varying the given name of each individual, 
generally using one of a nuiaber of long-established Christian names, but making 
the given name the first name. Women took the family names of their husbands, 
since the male was dominant in European culture. 

Later the use of middle names was adopted to assist further in establishing 
individual identification. For example, the time came when there were too many 
■John Smiths". Addition of a middle name for each one would make the complete 
name more distinctive. Examination of the name listings in this genealogy will 
angsly illustrate the value of middle names (or just middle initials) for the pur- 
pose of individual identification. 

In trying to find the significance of the name "Bortner", the key would 
normally be in the stem "Sort". The suffix "er" (or "ner") means a man who does 
something or is identified with soma thing. For exan?5le, a "gardener" is a man 
who maintains a garden (even in English). "Borte" means border, braid, or lace. 
"Bord" means board. One might make something of this, such as"he who lives on 
the border or edge", but there is no means of knowing whether such a conclusion 
would be true. 

A search in the Library of Congress for the origin of the name "Bortner", in 
German works on the subject of origin of German family names, showed the follow- 
ing: While the name "Bortner" was not listed, the name "Portner" was found j it 
was said to be a variation of an original family name "Pfortner". Another varia- 
tion mentioned was "Fortner". One might reasonably guess that the name "Bortner" 
was a variation of "Portner". In old German script, a capital "P" was much like 
a capital "B", and their sounds were much alike. However, there is no known evi- 
dence that "Bortner" was so derived. 

"Pfortner" means gatekeeper or porter. A castle gatekeeper was a common 
functionary in the ndddle ages. 

A large collection of German coats-of-arms in the Library of Congress con- 
tains one for a family of noble blood named "Pfortner von der HoUe" who lived in 
Silesia (East of Prussia, but now in Poland); authority for this coat-of-arms was 
granted in the year lU38. Another coat-of-arras is also shown in the same collect- 
ion for a related family, named simply "Pfortner", many of whose members were said 
to be mentioned in records of Prussian military service. It is doubted that the 
Bortner family — probably a peasant family in the Rhine RLver Valley at the same 
time — was related to either of those families. As mentioned previously, one 
Hans Bortner and his sons, Hans and Paul, received authority to display a coat-of- 

2U 



aros in the year lli$U. However, it is believed that "Pf^rtner" was such a eoamon 
descriptive personal noun in German-speaking countries during the Middle Ages as 
to make it likely that there were several unrelated families who had that name. 

When the German "o" has two dots above it, the sound is modified (imlaut); 
in English it sounds much like a short "e" or short "u**. Thus TfoVtner" sounds 
in English something like "PfSrt'nSr", but not precisely so. 

No record has been observed showing that "Bortner" was written in German with 
two dots above the "o", except a passenger-list of certain later Bortner arrivals 
in the United States (18$3). However, an expert on Pennsylvania Dutch writing 
and language, stated that it was not always the practice, in writing nams, to in- 
dicate that a vowel was subject to the umlaut, although in fact it was. The fact 
that some English-speaking people wrote the name "Burtner", if based upon the way 
that it was pronounced in German, would be an indication that the "o** was subject 
to the umlaut. And if the "o" was subject to the umlaut, it would be a good indi- 
cation that "Bortner" had been derived from "Pfortner", 

CHANCES OF THE FAMILY NAME TO "BOHDNER" AND "BUHTNER" 

Spelling German family names was and still is difficult for English-speaking 
people who know nothing of the German language. The difficulty is natural because 
of basic differences in the phonetic systems of the English and German languages, 
although the alphabets are the same. The English phonetic system is chaotic 
(much worse than the German system). English vowels and dipthongs are each sub- 
ject to more different sounds than the German, and unlike the German, are not sub- 
ject to either special pronunciation-marks or hard-and-fast rules (in relation to 
the spelling) for the selection of one sound as compared with another. The English 
language requires memorizing the vowel sounds in every written word, as well as 
spelling, and until one hears an authoritative pronunciation and sees the spelling 
of a new word (or looks xsp both pronunciation and spelling in a dictionary), he 
has no certainty of either. 

Therefore, it is not strange that many (perhaps most) Pennsylvania Dutch 
names underwent changes in spelling, as conq^ared with the Geirman. For exanqplet 
Maier, Meier, Meyer, Ifyers, Mayer; Schneider, Snyder; Miiller, Mueller, Miller; 
Schaeffer, Schaffer, Shaffer, Shafer; Frei, Frey, Fry; Kiifer, Kiefer, Keefer; 
Lasch, Lash, Losh; Bnerich, Ekerick; Brecht, Bright; Focht, Fought; Eisenhauer, 
Eisenhower; Feuerstein, Firestone. 

Records indicate that English-speaking people in Pennsylvania in the early 
days misspelled the Boi*tner name about as often as they spelled it correctly. 
While •^ordner" and "Burtner* were common misspellings, there were many others, 
including Portner, Bartner, Butner, Bertner, Birtner, Boardner, Bourtner, Bourd- 
ner, Borden, Boardman, Border, and Borgner. Some of these were legitimate names 
of other families, Pennsylvania Dutch or English. 

Signatures in a number of Bortner Deeds and Wills showed that they sometimes 
still signed their name "bortner" long after others spelled their name "Bordner" 
or "Burtner". Indeed, cases have been found where descendants caused a changed 
name to be chiseled on a tombstone, when the deceased had indicated by signature 
in his Will or a late Deed that no change had been made. However, ultimately a 

25 



najority of the Bortoers accepted one or the other of those tvo laisspellings •> - 
apparently whichever one was aost contnon in their coomunity. It is noteworthy 
that "Burtner" was the most common misspelling in widely separated Cuodberland 
County and Western Pennsylvania (in each of which there were many Protestant 
Scotch-Irish settlers }« and that "Bordner" was the most c<»uaon misspelling in the 
original Pennsylvania-Dutch country, where the English-speaking people included 
many Quakers. It is also noteworthy that the '^ortner" name was retained finally 
only by most of the descendants of Qeorge Bortner in Southern York County, most of 
whom remained close together for many years in a relatively pure Pennsylvania - 
Dutch comunity. 

As previously speculated, it is possible that the "Burtner" spelling was a 
fairly faithful English spelling of the name, based upon its actual pronunciation, 
if the "o" was subject to the umlaut. But possibly that spelling was based only 
upon the similarity of the name to the more familiar "Burton". The "Bordner" 
spelling might also have been based only upon the similarity of the name to the 
more familiar "Borden", or it might have been based upon a kind of reverse logic 
in the light of the German pronunciation. That is, if one actually understood 
the name to be pronounced "Bortner", as it normally sounds in English (and also 
in German, without the "o" subject to the uolaut), he Blight reason that; (l) 
there is no such name in English; (2) every Dutchman pronotmces "d" like "t";(3) 
therefore, he must spell the name with a "d" rather than a "t"; and ik) the result, 
"Bordner", does i^semble at least the common English name "Borden". 

The points at which the family name was changed in each branch of the family 
have been determined as carefully as possible, as related in the preceding Family 
History in America. It may be helpful for more convenient reference to list here 
in one place the names of those who first made the change (with indication of 
their generation, considering Balser Bortner as in the first generation). 

Changes from Bortner to Bordner t 

Generation Name 



2 Jacob (1720 - 1792) of Bethel Township, Berks County, Pa. 
Descendants of George Bortner of York County, Pa. - 

5 John (182U - 1871), grandson of John Bortner of Hopewell 

Township, York County. (However, his oldest son, Jacob F., 
changed his name back to Bortner.) 
Descendants of Peter Bortner of Lancaster County, Pa, - 
U Possibly Jacob (177U - cl829) of Itaion County, Pa., son of 

Jacob Bortner of Lancaster County and Cumberland County, Pa. 
But if he did not change his name, his sons did, as follows; 
S Jacob (1801 - 1880) of Stephenson County, Illinois 

5 George (180U - 1882) of Seneca County, N. Y. and 

Stephenson County, Illinois 
5 Benjamin (l8l5 - cl875) of Seneca County, N. Y. 

Sons of Philip Bortner of Berks County, Pa, - 

3 Henry (I76I - 18U5) of Northumberland County, Pa. and 

Stark County, Ohio 
3 Balser (1778 - 1853) of Northumberland County, Pa. 



26 



Changes from Bortner to Burtner t 

Generation Name 



Descendants of George Bortner of York Ck)unty- 
Sons of Peter Bortner of Northern York County- 
U George (1797 - 1877) 

h Peter Jr. (1799 - 1888) 

Grandsons of Peter Bortner of Northern York County- - 
sons of his son, William*^ (of the same area) - 
5 Levi (I81i2 - 1912) 

5 William Jr. (l8U8 - I887) 

Son of Elizabeth Ann, daughter of Martin Bortner*, who vas 
a son of Peter Bortner of Northern York County- 

6 Martin Henry (I86I - 1927) of York County 
Descendants of Peter Bortner of Lancaster County - 

U Samuel (1782 - 18$6) of Cumberland County, son of Jacob of 

Lancaster and Cumberland Counties 
Sons of George Bortner* of Cumberland County, Pa. and Mont- 
gomery County, Ohio, who was a son of Jacob of Lancaster 
and Cumberland Counties- 
5 Rev. Henry (I8OO - 1857) of Maiyland and Virginia 

5 George Otterbein (1802 - 1855) of Ohio and Illinois 

5 Jacob (1808 - 1886) of Montgomery County, Ohio 

5 Rev. John (I8I6 - 1885) of Ohio and Illinois 

5 Joseph (1821 - 1901) of Ohio and Indiana 

Descendants of Philip Bortner of Berks County- 
Sons of John Bortnei^ of Butler County - 
k Andrew (I8l5 - 1899) of Moniteau County, Missouri 

U Daniel (cl8l3 - cl875) of Butler County 

Sons of Philip Bortner* of Butler County, who was a son 
of John Bortner- 
5 Peter (cl8l7 -cl887) of Cincinnati, Ohio 

5 Philip (1820 - 1912 ?) of Butler County 

5 William (1822 - 1893) of Butler County 

Sons of Jacob Bortner* of Butler County, who was a son 
of John Bortner- 
5 Andrew (1827 - I88U) of Butler County and Morgan 

County, Missouri 
Sons of Philip Bortner* of Allegheny County - 
k George (l802 - 1879) of Allegheny County 

U Philip (1809 - 18U6) of Allegheny County 

U Jacob (I8lii - 1863) of Allegheny County 

■KSometimes erroneously known as "Burtner", especially 
by his descendants. 



27 



OTHER BORTNER, BQBDNER, AMD BDRTNSR IMMIGRiLKrS IN AMERICA 
AND THEIR DESCENDANTS 

A search vas made for Bordner and Burtner names and addresses in the tele- 
phone directories of all the principal cities in the United States. A library of 
such directories is maintained by the Bell Telephone Coicpany in Washington, D. C. 
In addition, many telephone directories for other places were obtained and exam- 
ined. By one means or another (principally correspondence), each Bordner and 
Burtner found listed was identified, with only one exception (one Burtner in New 
York City). All of those identified were found to be descendants of Balser Bort- 
ner (and are listed in this genealogy), with the following exceptions: 

In New York City and in nearby New Jersey, there are several descendants 
of Maximilian Bordner, who, it was said, was born in Vienna, Austria in 188? 
and was brought to the United States by his family in 1888. 

In Northfield, Massachusetts and Hinsdale, New Hanpshire, there are two 
sons of Stephen Bordner, who, it was said, also was bom in Austria and came 
to the United States about 1903. 

In Maryland, there are three sons of Philip Bodnar, a White Russian refu- 
gee who fled Russia during the 1917 revolution and came to the United States. 
It was said that he changed his name to "Bordner*, because he liked that 
narae better. 

In Waterbury and Thoraaston, Connecticut, there are two brothers named 
Bordner, one of whom stated that they ai^ descendants of another foreign im- 
migrant who also changed his name. He did not disclose the original name. 

It is suspected that the unidentified Burtner in New York City is not a descend- 
ant of Balser Bortner, It is possible that there may be additional exceptions in 
some rural areas, of whom the author has no knowledge. 

In addition to the search during this project for Bordners, Burtners, and 
their Bortner ancestors, both living and dead, the various records examined were 
reviewed for evidence of other Bortners, Bordners, and Burtners who were not born 
in the Ihaited States. Only one was found; Jacob Bordner, bom I8I4I/2 in Baden - 
- a brickmaker in Williams County, Ohio - - listed in the I87O U. S. census sched- 
ules. Although married to a woman with children by a previous marriage, he appar- 
ently bad no children of his own. 

In addition, a special search was made in the National Archives of the index- 
es of arrivals by ship in all of the Atlantic and Gulf -Coast Ports, for immigrants 
named Bortner, Bordner, and Burtner. These indexes were not coi^lete; the index 
for each port covered a different period. While the Philadelphia index covered 
the longest period (I8OO to 1906)*, the New York index covered only the period 



«The previoualy^nentioned work, "Pennsylvania German Pioneers", by Strass- 
burger and Hinke, purports to liflt all arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia 
from Europe for the period 172? to I8O8. Balser Bortner and his family 
were the only Bortners listed; no Bordners or Burtners were listed. 



28 



1820 to 18U6 (the shortest period of any, by far). Since New York was the princi- 
pal port of entry in the later years, this left a large gap in the search. It was 
not feasible to make a detailed search of the New York arrival lists for the ent- 
ire period since 18U6. The following arrivals were found: 

June 7, 1853 - Herman Heinrich Bortner, age 39, and family. Bom in 
Hanover. Destination - Pittsburgh. 

- Theresia Bortner, age 16. Born in Bavaria. Destination 
- Baltimore. (She came on the same ship with the first 
named above, although she was not listed as traveling 
with them. ) 

May 5> 185U - Wilhelm BoixJner, age 18. Bom in Hanover. 
Destination - Cincinnati. 

April 2, 1879- Franz Bordner, age Ul. Of Swedish nationality. 

June hj l881i - Mrs. Anna Bortner, age 2$, and infant daughter. 
Of German nationality. 

No living descendants, named Bordner or Burtner, of the above listed males 
have been found, nor of any others whose arrivals were not indexed, except as 
stated in the first paragraph of this section. (No such statement can be made 
with respect to living descendants who spell their name "Bortner", because the 
search did not cover the living Bortners . ) 

It is interesting to observe where the more recent arrivals of Bortners and 
Bordners came from: Hanover (in Northern Germany); Baden and Bavaria (in South- 
em Germany); Austria (which adjoins Bavaria); and even one from Sweden. It is 
interesting also that the name "Bortner" was written in the 1853 passenger-list 
with two dots over the "o" (umlaut). And it is interesting that some of the im- 
migrants spelled their name "Bordner"; whether their family name was once spelled 
"Bortner" in the Old Vforld is unknown. 

BACKGROUND - EARLY PENNSYLVANIA HISTORY 

William Penn obtained a Charter in l68l from King Charles II of England for a 
colony in the New World in payment of a debt owed to his father. Admiral Sir Wil- 
liam Penn. The Charter included a grant of ownership of all the land West of the 
Delaware River for 5° of longitude, between hO° and U3° North Latitude. William 
Penn was given the right to name the Governor of the Colony, but a legislative as- 
sembly, representing the people, was required. Proprietary rights were hereditary. 

Previously in 16U3 there had been a settlement established at the mouth of 
the Schuylkill River, on the Delaware River, as an offshoot of a Swedish Colony 
centered at the present site of Wilmington, Delaware. In 1655 the entire Colony 
of New Sweden had been taken by the Holland Dutch by military force and made a part 
of New Netherlands, which initially included much of the area now included in New 
York State. Then in 166U England acquired all of New Netherlands as a result of 



29 



defeating the Netherlands in a Viar. 

William Penn was a member of the religious Society of Friends, known as the 
Quakers. He planned to make his colony a "Koly Experiment" with the help of the 
Quakers - - a colony where all the people might live together in peace, with re- 
ligious liberty and freedom, provided only that they believe in God. However, 
non-Christians were not to be allowed to participate in the Government. This was 
more religious freedom than was generally available in the other colonies. As it 
turned out, there was also more democracy in Pennsylvania than in most of the 
other colonies, notwithstanding the semi-feudalistic character of Penn's propri- 
etorship. 

Penn named the colony the "Commonwealth of Pennsylvania", in honor of his 
father (meaning Penn's woodland). He established a capital at the mouth of the 
Schuylkill River, on the West side of the Delaware River, and named it "Philadel- 
phia" (meaning brotherly love). Philadelphia was well-located for a seaport. 

Penn himself came to the Colony in the year 1682 and remained for two years, 
during which the legislative assembly was established and he made a treaty of 
peace with the Indians and formally purchased title to the land in the Southeast- 
ern part of the colony. He appointed hiiriself Governor. 

After Penn returned to England, he depended upon his appointed Deputy Govern- 
or and Council to protect his interests in actual operation of the color^. He de- 
voted considerable efforts towards planning and promoting desirable immigration to 
the colony. For example, he personally wrote pamphlets on the advantages of the 
colony from the standpoint of geograpty and natural resources, as well as its pol- 
itical and religious freedom, and in those pamphlets he offered land for sale at 
low prices and low quit-rents; he offered 50 acres of free land to every indentured 
servant upon completion of his period of servitude; and he gave useful instructions 
to prospective immigrants. 

Previously Penn had made several tours of the Netherlands and the German 
States along the Rhine River, during which he had sought to make converts to the 
Quaker faith, especially among the Mennonites. Some English Quakers settled there 
as a nucleus for establishment of the sect. Later some of them were to aid in in- 
ducing Germans to go to Pennsylvania. Soon after Penn obtained his Charter, some 
Mennonites around Frankfurt were induced to form a corporation, and Penn gave them 
15,000 acres of land for a settlement. That settlement became Germantown - - the 
first of the German settlements in Pennsylvania. Today Germantown is part of the 
City of Philadelphia. These Mennonites, however, were not •'■he "'rst German sett- 
lers in Pennsylvania. There were some Germans in the Old Swedes Settlement before 
Penn obtained his charter. 

Penn had his political troubles in England, and even temporarily lost his 
rights for a few years. During the period from 1699 to 1701, he made one more and 
last trip to the Colony. He died in I7I8. 

Proprietary rights in the Colony passed to Penn's sons, John, Thomas, and 
Richard. The brothers placed sole responsibility for manageiicut of the Colony on 
Thomas, and when John died in 17l;6 he bequeathed his interest to Thomas. Although 
Thomas Penn did not assume the Governorship, he resided in Philadelphia from 1732 

30 



I 



to I7UI. Thereafter he was forced by the King to remain in England. However, his 
oldest son, John, was a resident of Pennsylvania and represented him from 1751 un- 
til the Revolutionary Viar, when the Penns' proprietary rights were terminated and 
their lands were taken over by the Commonwealth. 

The Colony received many settlers including, in particular, good and experi- 
enced farmers, and it grew rapidly and prospered. It profited by the mistakes 
made in the earlier English colonies, especially those in Virginia and Massachu- 
setts, and it never had as many growing pains as they did. 

At first the land was settled around Philadelphia in the three original coun- 
ties, Philadelphia, Bucks, and Chester. Then settlements fanned out farther and 
farther to the Viest and Northwest. New treaties with the Indians, including pur- 
chases of land title, were made from time to time as required. Altogether there 

were 33 treaties and purchases the last being made after the Revolutionary War 

for land in the Northwestern part of the State. Additional counties were created 
as new purchases of land were made from the Indians, and older counties were sub- 
divided and realigned into new counties as the population grew. 

The main flow of German settlers into Pennsylvania commenced about 1710, and 
became a flood after 1717. While at first they were called Palatines (from the 
Palatinate in the Rhine River Valley), they were later called Pennsylvania Dutch. 
The English settlers became concerned over the arrival of so many Germans, speak- 
ing a different language, having different customs, and accustomed to a different 
form of government. Therefore a law was enacted in 1727 requiring all arrivals in 
the Port of Philadelphia from Continental Europe to take an Oath of Allegiance to 
the British Crown. Two years later the law was extended to require an Oath of Fi- 
delity to the Proprietors and laws of the province, and an oath of abjuration of 
the King's enemies (that is, denial of support). The signing of such oaths was un- 
necessary, and would have been ineffectual if fears had been justified, but at 
least it provided complete records of German immigrants for reference by their 
descendants. 

One authority estimated that there were approximately 65,000 German immigrants 
between 1727 and the beginning of the Revolutionary War in 1775* based upon the 
number of heads of families who signed the oaths. Several authorities estimated 
that Germans comprised about one-third of the total population of Pennsylvania at 
different dates from 1750 to 1776. (One estimate of the total population was lh0,000 
in I75O; another was 160,000 in 1776.) The authorities thought that the Quakers 
were about equa.^ l.i ;. ambers to the Germans; the other one-third to be comprised 
principally of other Englishmen, Welch, and Scotch-Irish. 

Since the earlier settlers had pre-«empted the land nearest Philadelphia, the 
Pennsylvania Dutch were forced to settle on the then frontier in what are now Mont- 
gomery, Lehigh, Berks, and Lancaster Counties. Later they spread West and North- 
west into the adjoining counties (including those just West of the Susquehanna 
River) until they were blocked by the main Allegheny mountains. (The mountains run 
in parallel ridges from Northeast to Southwest.) It was not until after the Revo- 
lutionary War that they crossed the Alleghenies in large numbers. In the meantime, 
many drifted Southwestward in the Great Valley on the Eastern side of the Appalach- 
ian mountains into Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. 

31 



The ■'T^sbyterian Scotch-Irish from Northern Ireland also flowed into Penn- 
sylvania ia large numbers, following somewhat behind the flow of Germans. Con- 
sequently they settled farther West and crossed the Alleghenies to Western Penn- 
sylvania in larger numbers and earlier than the Germans. 

Pennsylvania farmers had large families. It was necessary to have sons and 
daughters to help with the large amount of work required in constructing buildings, 
clearing land of trees, tilling the soil, harvesting, raising livestock, preserv- 
ing food, making cloth and clothing, etc. Even with a large family, 160 acres was 
considered an ideal-sized farm; many farms were smaller. And when the oxmer of 
such a farm died, it could not be subdivided economically into smaller parcels and 
given to all of his sons. Because additional virgin land was unavailable near 
their homes, some of the sons were pressured into going to new land farther away. 
Otherwise they were forced to become laborers for wages, and for some years there 
was a limited demand for common labor. 

The final struggle between Great Britain and France for the New World began in 
175U on Pennsylvania soil. It began when a French force seized a fort being con- 
structed by Virginia provincial troops at the junction of the Allegheny and Monon- 
gahela Rivers, which is the source of the Ohio River. This land was claimed by 
both Virginia and Pennsylvania under their charters. The French were determined to 
hold the entire Ohio River Valley, as well as the St. Lawrence River Valley, the 
Great Lakes area, and the Mississippi River Valley. They had fur-trading posts and 
missions among the Indians throughout that area. Their only real settlements were 
a few on the St. Lawrence, and their total population was small. In contrast, the 
British colonies were concentrated along the Atlantic Coast from New Hampshire to 
Georgia; their population was much larger; they were well on the road to being 
self-sustaining and even contributing members of the British Empire; and Westward 
expansion was to be expected. 

The British Government immediately sent troops to Virginia under the command 
of General Edward Braddock for the purpose of undertaking an expedition to retake 
the fort. They already had Virginia's conqjlete cooperation, and they requested 
Pennsylvania's similar cooperation. The Pennsylvania Assembly was dominated by the 
pacifist-minded Quakers. In the previous King George's War (I7h6 - 17U9), the As- 
sembly would not vote for assistance, and the Governor then raised a voluntary 
force of UOO men for an expedition against Canada (in which Jacob Bortner enlisted, 
as previously related). The Assembly again rejected the call for aid, preferring 
to let the French have Western Pennsylvania than sacrifice their Quaker principles. 
In vain the Proprietors and the Governor tried to induce the Assembly to provide 
assistance. 

As generally known. General Braddock' s force was ambushed by the French and 
Indians and destroyed in late 1755 near Ft. Du Quesne (as the French named their 
fort at the forks of the Ohio). George Washington of Virginia was Braddock's aide, 
but he had no command. During the expedition up the Potomac River Valley and 
through Southwestern Pennsylvania, their only assistance from Pennsylvania was from 
a supply-train of 150 teams and wagons and a large number of horses hired from and 
driven by Pennsylvania Dutch farmers, after an appeal to them by Benjamin Franklin, 
then a Philadelphia printer and publisher and a budding politician. 

Following Braddock's defeat, the French succeeded in inciting many b.->.nds of 

32 



Indians (including the Delaware tribe of Penn<ivlvania «>,« v,oj n 

to attack the Pennsylvania frontieJle^tle^^tT S^of tL^ui?ains""pL'v^^^^^^ 

difficulties with the Delavares had been nore-or-l^ss ind^iru^'incidentslo" 

Pennsylvania Jutch, Scotch-Irish, InTTlu.V.ll'^VTC'^^^^ 
loudly for help from Philadelphia - - for arms and ammunition in particular 

At that point the Assembly had been engaged for sometime in a stubborn fight 
with the Governor over assistance to the Crown. The Assembly, with tongue in cheek, 
had agreed to provide assistance, with necessary taxation, providing the Proprietors 
were taxed on their vast Estate of unsold (and unproductive) virgin land. The Gov- 
ernor was forced by the Proprietors to veto the proposed tax. While the Quakers 
were opposed to war, they thought that it might be worth assistance in this war if 
they could establish the principle of taxing the Proprietors' Estate. Moreover, by 
their position they could shift blame to the Governor and Proprietors for inaction 
on assistance. 

Now the frontiersmen arose in wrath, and bands of them descended on Philadel- 
phia, demanding action from the Assembly. In response, the Proprietors made a 
voluntary grant of money to the Colonial Treasury in lieu of taxes, and the Assem- 
bly finally authorized formation of local militia companies by the people, erec- 
tion and manning of frontier forts, and provision of arms and ammunition, without 
taxing the Proprietors' Estate. 

In 1758 the British Government sent another force, this time to Philadelphia, 
to recapture Ft. Du Quesne, under the command of General John Forbes. Pennsylvania 
provided assistance, including a force of men larger than the Virginia and North 
Carolina forces. The Pennsylvania force was composed principally of Pennsylvania 
Dutch volunteers under command of foreign officers who could speak German. The ex- 
pedition took several months to cross the mountains, because they had to open a 
rough road beyond Bedford. Probably it would have been quicker to go South into 
Maryland and up the old Braddock road, as contended by George Washington (in com- 
mand of the Virginia and North Carolina troops). 

In the meantime the Pennsylvania and New York Governors had acted together, 
through representatives, to induce a great many of the Indian allies of the French 
to desert them. A Pennsylvania Dutchman, a Moravian Missionary to the Indians, 
named Christian Frederick Post, bravely played a major role in those negotiations, 
going among the Indians in the presence of the French, at great personal risk and 
hardship. 

It was Winter when Forbes' Array reached Ft. Du Quesne after extraordinary 
efforts and hardships. The weakened French retired without a fight and left the 
area forever. The place was immediately renamed Pittsburgh in honor of the Brit- 
ish Prime Minister, and a new and better fort was erected there named Fort Pitt. 
General Forbes soon died as a result of the hardships he had undergone. 

The rest of this last French and Indian War was conducted largely on the soil 
of New York State and Canada. It was climaxed by the successful conquest of Quebec 
by a British Army under General James V7olfe on September 18, 1759. 

33 



The Tfar had several important consequences for Pennsylvania. It brought 
about a certain degree of cooperation bet-ween the Colonies for a common end, and 
this was preparation for the Confederation of Colonies during the Revolutionary- 
War, which was soon to begin. It began to make patriots out of the settlers, in- 
cluding the Pennsylvania Dutch and Scotch-Irish on the frontiers who arose to de- 
fend their homes; and it brought about arming the people (especially through their 
militia). It unified the non-Quaker elements, and that was the beginning of the 
end for Quaker domination of the Assembly, since it led to forced changes in repre- 
sentation to make the membership more nearly proportional to the elements of the 
population . 

It was some years later before Pennsylvania finally established its legal 
right to tlie Southwestern part of the State against the Virginia claim. Pennsyl- 
vania also successfully defended similar claims by Maryland and Connecticut for 
part of its territory. However, a territorial dispute with New York resulted in 
Pennsylvania giving up about one-third of its original territory on the North. Its 
Northern boundary was moved South from the l3rd to the ii2nd parallel of latitude 
except for a small triangle of land in the Northwest corner of the State for a ' 
port on Lake Erie (in which was the site of the present City of Erie). 

T u l^,}'^^'^ *^ British Government decreed that no settlements should be estab- 
lished West of the Appalachian Mountains, out of respect for Indian ownership of 
those lands. That decree was respected by the Northern Colonies, but failure to 
respect it by the Southern Colonies led to trouble with the Indians, especially 
"".i *K®^T^.^®**^^'"^"^^ ^ Kentucky, concerning which no treaties were first made 
with the Indian residents. From I763 to I766 occured the Indian War known as the 
?,I?^fT7. P°^*iac- P°"tiac was an Ottawa Chief from the Great Lakes area. He 
succeeded in uniting many of the Indian tribes East of the Mississippi to fight 
for their lands West of the nxjuntains. ^ 

While most of the action in connection with Pontiac's conspiracy was in the 
West Pennsylvania did not escape involvement. There were Indian raLs on^he 
thinly populated settlements along the frontier, especially in the vallevs of th^ 
Northern and Western branches of the Susquehann^ River, ^6 aUaSts oj tL Sfst 
em Pennsylvania forts. Fort Pitt was saved by a rescie force of Pennsylvania 

Phil ^iM"^!!* *^" ^^^""^ ^*^'" ^ ^77li, the First Continental Congress convened in 

Congress also convened there one ye^ iTter LLr^^ m- .^^ Continental 
Boston bet^en Colonial forces^f rhe'^Britisf Scfttrf cfu le'dTh^t'clSTL 
Second Congress took steps for a united defense by troops fZaU lTtl^Z{olt, 
Tt^'^ru" °'°''^' Washington as Co-ander-in-cLf oftL ConJlneLl JS 

Lrny^iTt^d":^:^"-^:?!^^ Lir:Scbi?iie^eriJsi^i -^°^" ^",t 

raise, and only tbe ^....:i':^,Zl7 ^T.T^Z ^^^^t^ Tl%TJl tL„. 



Ultimately the Continental Congress did raise money for support of the war by bor- 
rowing and by printing its own currency (although such currency declined greatly 
in value). Another weakness was the absence of adequate organization of the central 
government; it had no Chief Executive except the President of the Congress, and he 
had no adequate staff. 

Early in 1776 Washington's Arny maneuvered the British Array out of Boston. It 
went to Long Island, New York. Shortly afterwards the Declaration of Independence 
was signed by the members of the Continental Congress on July k, 1776. Benjamin 
Franklin was the leading member of the Pennsylvania delegation which signed it. 

There soon followed a defeat of the Continental Army on Long Island, and a 
retreat to Philadelphia. The British settled down for the Winter in New York and 
Eastern New Jersey, and posted hired German (Hessian) troops at the end of their 
line in Trenton, New Jersey, near the Delaware River. Just before Christmas in 
1776 Washington executed his famous night-time crossing of the Delaware River, not 
far North of Philadelphia, and captured the Trenton garrison by surprise. Soon 
afterwards his Array won a battle from the British at nearby Princeton, New Jersey, 
before going into Winter quarters. The captured Hessians were imprisoned mainly 
in Pennsylvania Dutch cities. 

In the following year (1777) another British Army sailed up Chesapeake Bay, 
landed at the head of the Bay and marched on Philadelphia. Washington's krmy was 
defeated at Chadd's Ford on Brandywine Creek on September 11th, and the British 
Arny occupied Philadelphia. The British again defeated the Continental Arn^y at 
Germantown on October Uth when Washington attempted to surprise them. 

About the same time that the British were occupying Philadelphia, another 
Continental krmy, under the immediate command of General Horatio Gates, defeated 
General Burgpyne?s British Arnry and obtained complete and unconditional surrender. 
That Army had sought to invade the Colonies from Canada via Lake Chan^jlaign and 
unite with a British Army coming up to meet it from New York, thus cutting the 
Colonies in half. The British commander at New York failed to carry out his part 
of the assignment. Burgoyne's surrender is generally considered to have been the 
turning-point of the war. A great deal of fighting in various parts of New York, 
extending even into Vermont, preceded Burgoyne's defeat, but this is not the place 
to give details, since it is Pennsylvania history with which we are concerned pri- 
marily. 

Benjamin Franklin and two other Commissioners had been sent by the Continental 
Congress to Paris to try to obtain greater military assistance from France. Pre- 
viously the French had secretly provided some assistance, but it was not enough. 
The victory at Saratoga helped achieve the Commissioners' goal. The French then 
sent a fleet of naval vessels, with an Army, to assist the Colonies, and openly 
espoused their independence. 

The Winter of 1777/8 for the Army at Valley Forge, with shortages of food and 
clothing, was the worst Winter of the War. Supply support was later improved, but 
it was always deficient, due to a lack of adequate organization for supply and in- 
adequate financing of the war. The difficulties were not so much due to a lack of 
food and clothing in the Colonies. Later stepped-up materiel assistance from 
France also contributed greatly to winning the war. 

35 



Upon the approach of the British to Philadelphia, the Continental Congress moved 
to York in the Pennsylvania Dutch country. They remained there about a year until 
tney were able to return to Philadelphia after evacuation of the British. The 
British departed in the Spring of 1778 to return to New York, upon threat of a 
blockade of Delaware Bay by a French fleet. Washington followed the retreat of the 
British pert way across New Jersey and attacked them at Monmouth Courthouse, but the 
result was inconclusive. 

Thereafter the main action turned to an invasion of the South by another Brit- 
ish Army and its ultimate surrender at Yorktown, Virginia on October 19, 1781. A 
French fleet and a French knny, assisting the Continental krWt provided the vital 
means of forcing the surrender. That action marked the end of the war, but it was 
1783 before a Peace Treaty was concluded, granting the Colonies their independence. 
Benjamin Franklin was one of the four commissioners who represented the Continental 
Congress in the treaty negotiations. 

During the later years of the War, the military action on Pennsylvania soil 
consisted in local raids by Indians and Tory sympathizers from New York, primarily 
in the Wyoming Valley, near the Northern Branch of the Susquehanna River. 

Pennsylvania made great contributions to the winning of the war, and its people 
suffered accordingly. It provided regiments for the regular Continental Army from 
the beginning at Bunker Hill, and additional militia battalions when Pennsylvania 
was threatened with invasion. It also provided guns and ammunition, clothing, 
horses and wagons, and especially food from its bountiful farms. It is noteworthy 
that the Pennsylvania long-rifle, produced in the Pennsylvania Dutch country from 
German patterns, was the most advanced infantry weapon of its day from the stand- 
point of distance and accuracy of its bullets. A number of Continental regiments 
of riflemen were equipped with those weapons, but the rifles were not available in 
numbers to equip the entire Arny, if there had been a desire to do so. The Penn- 
sylvania Dutch participated fully in all respects to the winning of the war, espec- 
ially in products of their farms, but as might be expected, they did not contribute 
as much to leadership as did the English-speaking people, and doubtless for that 
reason their contributions have not been well-remembered in history. There was 
little trouble with Tory supporters of the British in Pennsylvania, as compared 
with New York State. However, there were many Quakers, Mennonites, and Amish who 
did not believe in fighting; they assisted in the winning of the war in peaceful 
ways. 

After independence was gained, the seat of government of the new IMited States 
was removed from Philadelphia to Princeton, New Jersey and elsewhere. For five 
years from 1785 to 1790, it was located in New York City. However, in I787 Phila- 
delphia was the location of the Convention which developed our permanent Constitu- 
tion for a stronger central government. And in 1790 the seat of the new Govern- 
ment, with George Washington as first President, was returned to Philadelphia for 
ten years while a new Federal city was built in Maryland on the banks of the Poto- 
mac River. Pennsylvania was one of the first states to ratify the new Constitution, 
while the other large states wrangled long and furiously before they ratified it. 

About the same time that the seat of the Federal Government was transferred to 
Washington, D. C, the seat of the State Government was transferred to Lancaster in 

36 



in the Pennsylvania Dutch country. Not long afterwards, in I8l2, the seat of the 
State Government was settled permanently in Harrisburg on the East bank of the Sus- 
quehanna River. Harrisburg was then only a town of 2,500 population at the site of 
a river ferry in the Pennsylvania Dutch country. It is a beautiful site. 

After the Revolutionary War, the area West of the Allegheny Mountains was set- 
tled, and Pennsylvania furnished its share of emigrants to Ohio and the rest of the 
Northwest Territory, and later to the other territories in the Great West. 

Pennsylvania had great mineral resources more than any of the other orig- 
inal states - - and that made up for the relative scarcity of good farmland in the 
mountains and Western part of the State. During the Industrial Revolution, Penn- 
sylvania became one of the foremost industrial states, utilizing effectively its 
coal, limestone, iron ore, and oil and gas. Many large industrial cities were 
created. Railroads were built rapidly to supply the needs for transportation. No 
satisfactory systems of water transportation within the State were possible. Phil- 
adelphia, a great seaport, and Pittsburgh, at the head of navigation on the Ohio 
River, had been connected by a road system, but horses and wagons were slow and 
could not carry heavy-enough loads. Eventually New York City surpassed Philadel- 
phia as a seaport, because of superior advantages; the Ohio River declined in im- 
portance in inland transportation; iron-ore deposits and oil pools were largely 
consumed; but other industries continued to thrive. 

With the development of the West, the center of agriculture moved West, and 
the arts of farming changed greatly, resulting in a decrease in manpower required 
on tne farm and an increase in the size of the farm unit for the purpose of econ- 
omical operation. These changes and industrialization of the Nation required peo- 
ple to leave farms and go to the cities where there were needs and opportunities 
for additional people. Adapting to these changes brought many problems to the 
people of Pennsylvania, as well as elsewhere. 

M)RE ON THE PENNSYLVANIA DUTCH 

Today the meaning of the term "Pennsylvania Dutch" is not generally well-un- 
derstood outside of Pennsylvania, because the meaning of the word "Dutch" has 
changed since the time it was first used. Today the term "Pennsylvania German" is 
more meaningful to most people to indicate the origin of those European immigrants 
who came in large numbers to Pennsylvania in the l8th century (although it is not 
accurate). At that time, tne word "Dutch" meant anybody who spoke the German lan- 
guage; that word was correctly used, because the German word for "German" was (and 
still is) "Deutsch". Subsequently the English use of the word "Dutch" was restrict- 
ed to apply only to natives of the Netherlands (or Holland) - - a very small part 
of the German people. Subsequently also, the English word "German" was applied to 
natives of Germany (a nation that did not exist in the l8th century); not all Ger- 
man-speaking people live in Germany or came from there. Because of this confusion, 
immigrants from the Netherlands have been called "Hollanders" in some areas where 
there are both Pennsylvania Dutch and Holland Dutch, such as in Southern Michigan. 

In Colonial times. New York was the only Colony which had a considerable num- 
ber of Hollanders. They were the first white settlers when the Colony was estab- 
lished by the Netherlands, and they remained after Great Britain acquired the 

37 



Colony. New York also had German settlers from the Rhineland. The English sett- 
lers in New York called the German settlers "Palatines", "High Dutch", and "German", 
and the settlers from the Netherlands, "Hollanders" and "Low Dutch", when they chose 
to distinguish them apart, although sometiraes they simply called all of them 
"Dutch". The terms "High Dutch" and "Low Dutch" corresponded to the terms "High 
German" and "Low German" which were used to describe the two basic dialects of the 
German language then in use in Europe. "Low German" was applied to the dialects 
spoken in the Low Co'jntries - - the Netherlands, Belgium, and other Northern German 
States. "High German" was applied to the dialects spoken in the Southern and Mid- 
dle German States - - they were on higher ground. "High" and "Low" had nothing to 
do with social status among those who spoke German dialects. In modern Germany and 
Austria, High German is the official language, although there are still many differ- 
ent dialects in use in different parts of those countries. The Netherlands has its 
own language, although it is still much like the German language. Switzerland uses 
both High German and French. 

It should be understood that the terras, "Pennsylvania Dutch" and "Pennsylvania 
German", include all persons of European origin whose immigrant ancestors spoke one 
of the dialects of the German language when they came to Pennsylvania. Their geo- 
graphic origin included not only the area now generally known as Germany, but also 
Switzerland, Alsace (now in Eastern France), and the Netherlands. At that time the 
area now known as Germany was composed of many small independent states. The names 
and locations of the states from which came most of the Pennsylvania Dutch are 
shown in the map on page 57. After the unification of the German States under the 
leadership of Prussia in I87I, the English use of the word "German" was restricted 
to natives of the German Empire and, since World War I, the successor nations; this 
meaning is too restrictive to correctly indicate the geographic origin of all of 
the Pennsylvania Dutch. Hence, even the term "Pennsylvania German" requires special 
definition in order to avoid confusion as to it meaning. 

All of the first German settlers in Pennsylvania were generally called "Pala- 
tines", because so many of them came from the Palatinate in the Rhineland. In a 
short time, the use of that term was abandoned in Pennsylvania, because it was too 
restrictive as to geographic origin. However, the terra continued to be used in 
New York, where it was raore accurate. 

All Pennsylvania Dutch settlers were Protestants. The majority were members 
of the Lutheran or Reformed Churches, but there were also some Moravians and many 
members of more radical and pious creeds who collectively called themselves "The 
Plain People" - - they included Mennonites, Amish (a branch of the Mennonites), 
Dunkers or Dunkards (German Baptist Brethren), and Schwenkf elders. There were also 
a few French Huguenots (French Refomed Church) among them; they were not necces- 
sarily of German descent, but many spoke the German language, having lived in Ger- 
man States for sometime after fleeing from persecution in France. 

The first German immigrants in the Pennsylvania Colony after William Penn 
acquired it were thirteen families of Mennonites sent out by a company in Frankfurt 
in 1683. Later that company sent additional families and received an additional 
grant of land. The first settlement was in Germantown, which is now a suburb of 
Philadelphia; a later settlement was in the region called "Falckner's Swamp" in 
Montgomery County. Good reports by two of the Mennonites' leaders, Franz Josef 
Pastorius and Daniel Falckher, were influential in persuading other Germans in the 

38 



Rhineland to emigrate to Pennsylvania. 

In the year 1709 there occured an extraordinary mass-exodus of German families 
from the Palatinate and neighboring districts in the Rhineland. More than 13,000 
Germans made the long voyage down the Rhine to Rotterdam, and many more would have 
followed them if the British had not taken steps to stop the flow at the source. 
While agents of William Penn, and also of the Proprietors of the Carolina Colonies, 
had solicited German immigrants for a period of several years, nothing like this 
had happened before, and it was entirely unexpected. No arrangements had been 
made for their transportation. It happened that the British had landed many troops 
in Holland that Summer to fight under the Duke of Marlborough against the French in 
the War of the Spanish Succession. The troop ships were used to transport the Ger- 
mans to England, to the great relief of the Netherlands, which had been providing 
food and other assistance to them. 

In England these refugees were quartered in a temporary settlement near London, 
and they were supported by the Government and religious charities until plans were 
made to settle them in British possessions. Queen Anne was most sympathetic with 
the plight of the poor Palatines, and she did all that she could for them. It took 
more than a year to dispose of them. First, all of the many Catholics were returned 
to their homeland; Great Britain wanted only Protestant immigrants. Likewise, many 
others who were disillusioned and desired to return home, were sent back. Strange- 
ly very few, if any, were sent to Pennsylvania; apparently William Penn's fortunes 
were at a low ebb at that time. About 3^000 were sent to the New York Colony; about 
600 were sent to North Carolina; some were sent to the West Indies; and many were 
sent to Ireland . 

Governor Hunter of the New York Colony personally undertook a project for prof- 
it to produce tar and other naval stores from pine trees for the British Govern- 
ment. He obtained Palatines from the Government for laborers on this project, but 
they considered that it was only a stepping-stone to having their own farms. They 
must have suffered terribly during the voyage to America, because almost one-fourth 
of them died enroute or shortly after they arrived in New York. Approximately UOO 
widows and old people were left in New York City; the remainder were sent to the 
area of Neuberg (now Newburgh) on the Hudson River, where the men were required to 
work in the pine woods. 

Governor Hunter's resources were insufficient to maintain the Palatines during 
the development period before the project would be self-supporting. As a result, 
in 1712 they were starving and sought to acquire their own land and commence farm- 
ing to support themselves. Beginning in that year, despite the objections of Gov- 
ernor Hunter, some Palatines became farm-tenants along the Hudson, and others went 
to the Schoharie Valley, which is West of Albany. There they purchased virgin land 
direct from the Indians. Unfortunately the same land had been sold previously by 
the Indians to rich English and Holland-Dutch landowners; at least that was alleged 
subsequently and legally established. The landowners then offered to let the Pala- 
tines continue to occupy and farm on rental the land they already occupied and^ 
thought they owned. This situation was consistent with the European feudalistic 
system of land-tenure common in the New York Colony --- - a system which was protected 
by the power-structure of the Color^. 

The Schoharie Palatines believed that they were victims of a conspiracy to de- 
fraud and exploit them, in which Governor Hunter was involved, similar to the manner 

39 



in which they had been exploited in the Old Country. Some became tenants but, at 
the invitation of Governor Keith of Pennsylvania, about 60 families went to Penn- 
sylvania, beginning in 1723. They went overland a short distance to Lake Otsego, 
which is the source of the North Branch of the Susquehanna River (at the subsequent 
site of Cooperstown) . There they built canoes, in which they floated down the Sus- 
quehanna to near the site of the later city of Harrisburg, where they ascended Swa- 
tara Creek to the area of the Tulpehocken Settlement, which had just been started 
by the Pennsylvania Dutch on the Tulpehocken Creek, a small tributary of the Schuyl- 
kill River in what is now Western Berks County. 

Among the emigrants from the New York Colony was Conrad Weiser, who became an 
important personage in the affairs of the Colony of Pennsylvania. With his father's 
permission, he had lived for several years with the Mohawk Tribe, like an adopted 
son of a Chief, and had learned their language and customs. In Pennsylvania, be- 
cause of that experience, he served for many years as a kind of Indian agent to aid 
in keeping the peace between the Indians and the settlers; he also assisted the Ind- 
ians in obtaining more just treatment when they were wronged. The Delaware Indians 
of that area were under the dominance of the Iroquois Confederation of the New York 
Colony, which included the Mohawks, and that relationship strengthened Weiser's 
position. 

Some additional Germans, but not many, emigrated to New York. Eventually many 
of them, including some of the first Palatine immigrants, settled in the Mohawk 
River Valley (especially in the area of Herkimer and Canajoharie) and in the Cherry 
Valley to the South of the Mohawk, as well as in the Schoharie Valley. They pros- 
pered, eventually acquired their own lands, and made a garden-land of those areas, 
just as they did in Pennsylvania. But in the Rhineland, New York was not considered 
a desirable place to go. Nor did the New York authorities solicit more Germans. 

After 1710 the flow of immigrants from the Rhineland to America continued at a 
slow but steady pace. Most of them went to Pennsylvania through the Port of Phila- 
delphia, but some of them went to Maryland, Virginia, and the Carolinas. As relat- 
ed in the brief early history of Pennsylvania, the English-speaking settlers became 
concerned about this, and as a res'olt, the Colonial Assembly passed a law requiring 
all foreign immigrants to take an Oath of Fidelity. Colonial records of those Oaths 
and related passenger lists, beginning in 1727, provide a means of knowing much 
about the flow of German immigrants into Pennsylvania from that time forward, al- 
though they do not disclose the specific places from whence they came. 

The records show that approximately 1,2^0 immigrants arrived in six ships in 
1727, and from 300 to 700 in each of the next four years. In 1732 (the year that 
Balser Bortner and his family came) there were almost 2,000 immigrants in eleven 
ships. All of those ships were English owned and operated, but they carried the 
immigrants all the way from Rotterdam, with a stop enroute at an English Channel 
Port. This was much more convenient for the Germans than embarking for America 
from an English Port. 

By 1727 a system had been developed for German immigration to Pennsylvania as 
follows: Although the English provided the ships to transport iirjnigrants from 
Rotterdam to Philadelptiia, merchants in Holland would finance passage for those 
who had insufficient means (most of them), provided they would agree to become in- 
dentured servants upon arrival in America. In a few cases, apparently a ship's 
captain would act as financier, rather than a merchant. Under all such arrangements, 

Uo 



a ship's captain would advertise the arrival of his ship in Philadelphia, with des- 
criptions of the servants which were obtainable. Prospective purchasers of those 
servants would come aboard ship and bargain with them directly, so that the immi- 
grants had some choice of masters, based partly upon what they had to offer. Each 
purchaser was required to pay the ship's captain for the unpaid transportation 
charges, and the period of servitude would be proportionate. The typical fare from 
Rotterdam to Philadelphia was IC pounds each for persons over age 10, and 5 pounds 
each for children between 5 and 10 years of age. There was no charge for children 
under 5. A servant would earn 3 to U pounds per year plus clothes and keep; thus 
it was coiTimon for the period of servitude to last three or fo'or years. 

In Pennsylvania, indentured servants were generally called "redemptioners", be- 
cause they had to redeem themselves from servitude by work. As it appears today, a 
"redemptioner" was much like a slave, although servitude was voluntarj'- in the first 
place, and lasted only for a limited period. One of the worst features of the sys- 
tem, in the beginning, was that families were sometimes separated. However, there 
were laws for the protection of both master and servant, and those laws vere improv- 
ed in time to protect against abuses that were found. Ultimately separation of fam- 
ilies was forbidden, and a servant was permitted to change masters if he desired. 
The Proprietors of the Colony allotted additional land to masters for the use of 
servants, and for some time the Proprietors allotted each servant, upon redemption, 
$0 acres of land free, except for a quitrent of two shiillings per annum. A former 
servant might also contract to purchase additional land, just like anybody else. 
Repulsive though this system vias, it had advantages. Without it m^ny poor people 
could not have come to America. Moreover, it provided some incentive to ship cap- 
tains tc operate cleaner and healthier ships in order to collect their fares upon 
delivery of the passengers in Phiiladelphia . The system also permitted immigrants 
time to get accustomed to the ways of the Colony and probably to find a better even- 
tual home. It was said that some Germans became redemptioners only for the latter 
reasons, when they were able to pay for their transportation. The system was not 
peculiar to Pennsylvania ; it was originated in the Virginia Colony and apparently 
was used in the Southern Colonies. 

The merchant-brokers in Holland who financed ship transportation, sent agents 
among the people in the Rhineland to induce them to emigrate. Many of those agents 
were German imm.igrants to America who had returned (generally failures); they were 
called "Neulanders". Many carried gold watches with large gold chains to impress 
the peasants with the wealth which might be obtained by going to America. Govern- 
ment authorities in the German States called them "slave dealers" and "sellers of 
souls", and would put them» in jail if they caught them. 

Other means were also used by the German State authorities to discourage loss 
of their citizens, including publication of scare-stories on the hardships of going 
to Am.erica, deprivi"" emdgrants of any right to inheritance of property in their 
mother-country, taxing emigrants as much as 10^ of the value of their personal prop- 
erty (including cash) that they took with them, and making it a felony for anybody 
to purchase property from one who is going to leave "f-ne countrj'-. Also peasants 
were required to obtain certificates of manumission from vassalage, without which 
they might be stopped anywhere along the Rhine and returned to their liege -masters, 
like runaway slaves from the South at a later day in America. However, it appears 
that giving such certificates was required, if requested, and that payment of the 
related tax was generally excused if one was poor. Although most emigrants were 
peasant farmers, some were free men - - principally artisans. 

Ul 



A German family going to Pennsylvania from the Rhineland had to travel from 
its home to Rotterdam by barge on the Rhine River, and perhaps, also on one of its 
tributaries, such as the Neckar, Main, or Moselle Rivers. Then, just as today, 
Rotterdam in the Netherlands, at the mouth of the Rhine, was a great ocean port and 
terminal for river traffic to and from much of Central Europe, but unlike today, it 
was necessary to use the rivers to transport people, as well as goods. Barge trans- 
portation was slow, not only because they did not have steam or diesel power, but 
also because the Rhine boats were required to stop for customs examinations and pay- 
ment of tolls at more than thirty points, because of the multiplicity of independent 
states along the river. Boats were often detained to suit the convenience of the 
customs inspectors, and perhaps to require the passengers to spend money locally for 
necessities. But it has also been said that the emigrants were given food and drink 
as a charity at some places. This explains why a trip down the Rhine to Rotterdam 
required four to six weeks. It was said that the cost of the trip averaged about 
$35 per person in our money. In consequence, many a family spent much of its limit- 
ed resources just to get to Rotterdam. And then emigrants might be detained in the 
Netherlands as much as five or six weeks, at great expense, before a ship was ready 
to sail from Rotterdam. 

One CkDttlieb Mittelberger, a native of Wurtemburg, who went to Pennsylvania and 
returned disillusioned, was the author of a detailed description of his experiences. 
He wrote with a sour attitude, and perhaps he exaggerated a little. His work pro- 
vided much of the infomation used in preparing the foregoing statement regarding 
the Rhine journey and the following statement regarding the ocean voyage to America, 

Aboard ship, people were packed like herrings; each person was given a space of 
only two feet by six feet in a bedstead, in a large cabin or hold of the ship. Eight 
days to four weeks, depending upon the wind, was required for the voyage to the Eng- 
lish Channel port of Cowes, where there was another customs inspection and payment 
of tolls; that might require another week or two. After leaving Cowes the real mis- 
ery began. It tooks from seven to twelve weeks more to reach Philadelphia, also de- 
pending upon the winds. They lived in misery from the results of crowding, as well 
as from seasickness, bad food, and foul water. The art of food preservation was 
then most primitive; salt was a common means of preserving meat, and only certain 
foods could be kept for any length of time. Lice and filfth were everywhere. There 
was much dysentery, constipation, vomiting and fever; many had boils and scurvy. 
Communicable diseases often broke out. In the cramped quarters there was a constant 
stench, and the passengers were exposed to the spread of disease by having to 
breathe the foul air exhaled by everybody. There were periods of heat, but also 
periods of coldness and wetness, especially at night. Misery was climaxed during 
gales which lasted two or three days. Then midst the howling of the gale, the noise 
of waves breaking over the ship, and the groaning and creaking of the ship's timbers 
as the ship plunged, pitched and rolled, many cried out or whimpered piteously night 
and day, in fear for the safety of the ship and their lives, as well as in misery 
from sickness and suffering from being cold and wet. Some died and many were in bad 
condition when the ship reached Philadelphia. 

It has been reported that immigrants were sometimes not permitted to bring the 
chests of their possessions aboard ship (or not all of them), because of lack of 
space. Sometimes they had to leave their chests in Holland; sometimes the chests 
were transported on another ship; and when chests were brought on the same ship, 
they were stored in another place on the ship. In any case they might never see 
those possessions again. lumbers of the ship's crew often broke into the passengers' 

U2 



chests and took what they wanted. The ovners got no satisfaction by complaining to 
the ship's captain. 

Because of time requirements and the weather, ship voyages with immigrants 
were made generally during the Summer months, with arrivals in Philadelphia from 
August to October. And this meant that the immigrants would have been required to 
leave home several months before their arrival. 

In our time, we can only stand in awe and admiration for the fortitude, strength, 
and endurance of our forefathers who came to America. Perhaps if they had under- 
stood in advance the true extent of their ordeal, many would have decided against 
leaving their homeland in quest of im.proving their lot in a land about which they 
knew very little. This should be an inspiration to their descendants to aid in sur- 
mounting their much smaller difficulties. None of us are required to endure so much. 

There were good reasons why the Germans were impelled to flee from their home- 
land in large numbers in the l8th century. In general, they desired to escape the 
conditions under which they lived. Peasants were like permanent tenant-farmers, in 
that they had to pay rent for their farms and could not become land-owners. In ad- 
dition, they had to contribute military and personal services to their landlords 
and princes. And they were heavily taxed to support their princes in luxury. Taxes 
were also used to support a favored State religion, which may have been some other 
than their own religion. Each head-of-state could select the official religion for 
that state, and changes were sometimes made, including especially changes from Luth- 
eran or Reformed to Catholic. Although, contrary to the situation in France, there 
was a theoretical right to individual choice of religion and there was no cruel per- 
secution of the unorthodox, there was some discrimination against persons having 
contrary religions (such as taxes to support the favored religion), and there was 
sometimes appropriation of property of the unfavored churches. Worst of all was the 
cruel suffering by the people during the frequent terrible wars during the 17th and 
early l8th centuries. The Thirty Years' VJar (I6I8 to l61i8) was a religious civil- 
war between the German States, including Austria (Catholics vs. Protestants) in 
which one side or the other was at one tiire aided by outsiders, including France, 
Denmark, and Sweden; that war was the worst in the history of civilization. From 
time to time there were later invasions by French armies of the territories of their 
iijeak German neighbors. During the period I7OI to 171ij, the German states in the 
Rhineland were again ravaged by the French in the War of the Spanish Succession. 
Armies of both sides lived off the land, and they plundered, pillaged, and burned 
property, and murdered, raped, and extorted money from the inhabitants. The Palatin- 
ate, in particular, suffered in all of those wars, especially the part on the West 
side of the Rhine, which was nearest to the French. The Palatinate was the richest 
agricultural region in Central Europe; it was a source of support for friendly as 
well as enen^ armies, and a target for destruction by enemy armies. Consequently 
the poor people of the Rhineland were greatly attracted by the promises of freedom, 
peace, and economic opportunity in America, especially in the Pennsylvania Colony 
- - promises, which by all reports from there, were beginning to be fulfilled. The 
origin and meaning of the causes of discontent in the Rhineland will be illuminated 
more in a later section on the background of German history. 

The original Pennsylvania Dutch country was in the present Montgomery, Lehigh, 
Berks, Lebanon, and Lancaster Counties. As the population of that area became sat- 
urated, the Pennsylvania Dutch spread into adjoining counties, including particular- 
ly the present Northampton, Carbon, Luzerne, Schuylkill, Dauphin, Northumberland, 

U3 



Montour, Columbia, Union, Snyder, Centre, Perry, Juniata, Mifflin, Cumberland, York, 
Adams, Franklin, and Huntingdon Counties, where they represented a large portion of 
the population. These areas are shovn in the map on page 56. 

Beginning even before the Revolutionary Vfer, the Pennsylvania Dutch overflowed 
into Maryland and Virginia, down the Great Valley on the Eastern side of the Appa- 
lachian Mountains - - the Cumberland Valley in Pennsylvania and Maryland - - the 
Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. They comprised a majority of the population of those 
areas. Those areas were also very fertile. Altogether, the Pennsylvania Dutch ac- 
quired much of the best agricultural land in the Colonies East of the mountains; 
they knew how to select it. 

As previously stated in the background of early Pennsylvania history, it was 
estimated by several authorities that Germans comprised about one-third of the total 
population of Pennsylvania at different dates from 1750 to 1776. The total estimat- 
ed population of Pennsylvania in 1776, about the time of the beginning of the Revo- 
lutionary War, was 160,000. During the war, iiranigration practically ceased. 

After the Revolutionary War some Hessian soldiers who had fought for the Brit- 
ish remained in the Colonies. It has been estimated that of 30,000 total Hessian 
soldiers, about 5j000 did not return to their homeland; therefore, 5,000 should be 
the maximum number who might have remained in the Colonies. Hessians captured at 
Trenton and Saratoga were confined in prison-camps in the Pennsylvania Dutch coun- 
try-, in or near Reading, Lancaster, and York in Pennsylvania; Frederick, I-Iaryland; 
and Winchester, Virginia; where their Pennsylvania Dutch guards spoke their lang- 
uage. Those who remained in America probably sought anonymity by becoming absorbed 
among the Germans in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and the Carolinas, because 
they were disliked and scorned by Americans for their having fought for the enemy, 
although they, as individuals, were not responsible for that; they had been corrpell- 
ed to do it by their rulers. It is said that even the Pennsylvania Dutch disliked 
them. Even if 5*000 Hessians settled among the Pennsylvania Dutch, they were rela- 
tively few in relation to those who had come before the war plus their descendants. 
Othei*wise, the input of German immigrants into the Pennsylvania Dutch population is 
considered to have ended in the l8th century. Subsequent German immigrants general- 
ly by-passed the Pennsylvania Dutch country where land had become too high-priced 
for new immigrants . 

After the Revolutionary War, many Pennsylvania Dutch crossed the Allegheny 
Mountains into Western Pennsylvania, and they composed a proportionate part of the 
hordes who emigrated farther V/est during the 19th century. As a result, today there 
are many more persons having Pennsylvania Dutch blood (at least in part) outside 
Pennsylvania than inside. It was a general rule that emigrants who went West gener- 
ally held to approximately the same lines of latitude as the places from which they 
came. Therefore, as might be expected, today persons of Pennsylvania Dutch descent 
comprise a high proportion of the population of Northern Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, 
Southern Kiichigan, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and Colorado. 

Some appreciation of the extent of population increase in the United States of 
persons of Pennsylvania Dutch descent may be gained by considering the increase in 
the Bortner family as indicated in the genealogical registers in this work. The 
rate of increase was doubtless typical of all the Pennsylvania Dutch. 

Additional German immigration into the United Stated in the 19th century flowed 



most heavily into the Middle West. Immigration data indicates that 6,81i5,000 German 
immigrants entered the United States from 1820 to 1965; this was about 16^ of total 

immigrants for the period the largest ratio for Nationals of any country. And 

that excludes German-speaking persons from other nations, such as Austria, Switzer- 
land, the Netherlands, France, and Belgium. 

Dr. A. B. Faust in his work, "The German element in the United States", esti- 
mated that approximately 2% of the white population of the entire United States in 
1900 had German blood, and gave statistical evidence to support that estimate. If 
that was true in 1900, it probably is still true. But this includes descendants of 
19th century German immigrants as well as the Pennsylvania Dutch - - one group may 
be as numerous as the other. 

United States historians have slighted or unfairly treated the subject of Ger- 
man participation in the making of the Nation, probably because most historians have 
been New Englanders, and they have been notoriously provincial. This is partially 
illustrated in the following single statement from Parkman's monumental history of 
the struggle between France and England in the New World: 

"The essential antagonism of Virginia and New England was afterwards to become, 
and to remain for a century, an element of the first influence in American history. 
Each might have learned much from the other; but neither did so till, at last, the 
strife of their contending principles shook the continent. (Meaning the Civil War.) 
Pennsylvania differed widely from both. She was a conglomerate of creeds and races, 
- English, Irish, Germans, Dutch, and Swedes; Quakers, Lutherans, Presbyterians, 
Romanists, Moravians, and a variety of nondescript sects. The Quakers prevailed in 
the eastern districts; quiet, industrious, virtuous, and serenely obstinate. The 
Germans were strongest towards the centre of the colony, and were chiefly peasants; 
successful farmers, but dull, ignorant, and superstitious. Towards the west were 
the Irish of whom some were Celts, always quarreling with their German neighbors who 
detested them; but the greater part were Protestants of Scotch descent, from Ulster; 
a vigorous border population. Virginia and New England had each a strong distinct- 
ive character. Pennsylvania, with her heterogeneous population, had none but what 
she owed to the sober neutral tints of Quaker existence. A more thriving colony 
there was not on the continent. Life, if monotonous, was smooth and contented. 
Trade and the arts grew. Philadelphia, next to Boston, was the largest town in 
British America; and was moreover, the intellectual centre of the middle and south- 
ern colonies. Unfortunately, for her credit in the approaching war (meaning the 
final French and Indian War) the Quaker influence made Pennsylvania non-combatant. 
Politically, too, she was an anomaly; for, though utterly unfeudal in disposition 
and character, she was under feudal superiors in the persons of the representatives 
of William Penn, the original grantee." 

Since the Pennsylvania Dutch retained their customs, language, and religions, 
and settled in communities of their own kind, they were looked upon by some of their 
English-speaking neighbors with contempt, mixed with fear. It was fear that led to 
the laws requiring all foreigners to take Oaths of Fidelity and Abjuration. Benja- 
min Franklin once called them stupid, and he deplored their continuance in using the 
German language, as follows: "Few of their children know English. They import many 
books from Germany, and of the six printing houses in the province, two are entirely 
German; two half-German, half -English; and but two are entirely English". Note, 
however, that the facts cited tend to show that the Pennsylvania Dutch were at least 
as literate as the English-speaking Pennsylvanians . 



It has always been true that minorities who are different, whether in national- 
ity, race, or religious creed, are looked down upon, or even hated, by the majority. 
And the Pennsylvania Dutch were a minority, although a large one - - in nationality, 
language, and religious creed, although not in race. The Anglo-Saxons from England 
were primarily German in their racial origin, and the English language belongs to 
the Germanic family of languages. Actually also, the several German religous creeds 
had their counterparts among the various creeds of the English and Scotch-Irish - - 
all were Protestant, all were Christian. 

A tjT)ical English provincial's first reaction to the Pennsylvania Dutch is con- 
tained in the following excerpt from the young George Viashington' s journal in 17li8, 
when he surveyed land in the Shenandoah Valley, near Winchester, for Lord Fairfax, 
the Proprietor: "I really think they (meaning the German settlers he found there) 
seemed to be as ignorant a set of people as the Indians. They would never speak 
English but, when spoken to, they speak all Dutch". 

To set the record straight, around the beginning of the present cent'ory. The 
Pennsylvania German Society began to publish books, containing both modern and col- 
onial writings, concerning the Pennsylvania Dutch, whom they preferred to call 
German. And a few historians and other authors have undertaken to fill the need for 
information on the Pennsylvania Dutch. Yet it is still true that one must go to 
specialized works to obtain such information. 

Actually there were few observers of the Pennsylvania Dutch in colonial times 
who reported their observations. The principal one was Dr. Benjamin Rush, the lead- 
ing physician and surgeon in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War period and 
immediately thereafter. He was not of German descent. Much, but not all, of the 
following information is taken from his essay, written in 1789, "Account of the Man- 
ners of the German Inhabitants in Pennsylvania" . 

Dr. Rush acknowledged that the general prosperity of Pennsylvania in his time 
was largely due to the productivity of Pennsylvania Dutch agriculture. He observed 
that most of their farms clearly showed prosperity and superiority to other farms. 
He noted that the Germans generally settled on good land, particularly in limestone 
areas. Their land was generally wooded originally, but they thoroughly cleared the 
parts they desired for pastures and cultivation. They not only cut down the trees, 
but they removed all the stumps and grubbed out the roots, so that they would not 
damage their plow-points. Most other settlers of the time did not remove the stumps 
and roots, but left them to decay; many did not even fell the trees, but killed them 
by girdling - - they had to plow and cultivate around the trees or stumps. German 
farmers generally had well-fenced fields and pastures (presumably rail fences), con- 
trary to general colonial practice, so that the livestock could not get at the grow- 
ing crops, but were confined to their pastures. They economized in the use of wood; 
for example, they already used stoves for room- heating rather than the more wasteful 
fireplaces which were commonly used. They also retained and efficiently maintained 
sufficient woodland for future use; they did not attempt to cultivate all the land. 

A good barn came before a good house. The original houses were built of logs, 
which were generally cut square, at least on the ends, where they were carefully 
mortised into the ends of the logs of the adjoining walls. Spaces between logs were 
filled with straw and mortar. In some cases the barn was in the same building as 
the first house. Building a permanent house was left to the next generation, and 
then stone or brick was the most favored material. 

Ii6 



Houses were plainly and even roughly furnished, following the peasant practices 
in the homeland. Sawbuck tables and square-plank-back chairs were used. Wooden 
chests, comparable in size to modern cedar chests, were in general use for personal 
belongings; often they had colorful folk-art designs painted on them. Plain wood 
bed-frames were covered by feather beds, and surprisingly, light feather beds were 
used as bed coverings rather than quilted comforters - - they were warm, but it is 
a mystery how they kept their feet covered at the bottom of the bed. Less crude 
furniture was used in later years. 

The Germans owned livestock of all kinds and early favored horses over oxen 
for draft purposes. Local German wagonmakers built fine wagons. Most farmers 
owned a fair-sized wagon which required four horses to pull it, for carrying farm 
products to market over the rough dirt roads. These wagons generally had white lin- 
en covers spread over half -hoops above the wagon-top. A fine breed of draft horses, 
known as the Conestoga (now extinct) was developed. Larger covered wagons, requir- 
ing more than four horses were also developed for carrying freight long distances; 
these were also called "Conestoga". They had a sag in the middle to prevent the 
freight from shifting when the wagon went up- or down-hill. ¥agons were brightly 
painted - - generally the bodies were Prussian blue, the undercarriages and wheels 
were vermillion. 

The Germans fed their animals well and did not overwork them. In cold weather 
they sheltered them in warm bams, not only for humane reasons, but also because the 
animals would not consume so much feed to keep warm. They developed the bank barn; 
it was commonly a large barn, built into the side of a hill, with two floors - - the 
lower floor for the animals; the upper floor for hay, straw, and grain, into which 
they could drive their loaded wagons at ground level for unloading. When no hill 
was available, an earthen ramp was built up to the second floor. Brick and stone, 
as well as luniber, were used in barn construction; often composite. More extensive 
use of lumber was made in later years. These barns were often decorated with color- 
ful folk-art designs, known as hex-signs; originally it was thought that such signs 
brought good-luck, or possibly they might keep evil spirits away. 

They raised wheat, rye, oats, barley, buckwheat, Indian corn, sorghum, meadow 
grass, red clover, flax, and hemp, and they had fruit orchards and kitchen gardens. 
They were well in advance of the other colonial farmers in horticulture. Bee colon- 
ies were maintained by some for the production of honey. Wheat was their principal 
cash crop. By 1750, Pennsylvania exported a great deal of wheat, wheat-flour, and 
some Indian corn, practically all produced by the Pennsylvania Dutch. 

Farm families ate sparingly of meat (principally boiled), used rye flour and 
corn meal for breads (more than wheat flour), and they consumed large quantities of 
vegetables and fruits, especially cabbage, potatoes, onions, and apples. Cabbage 
was used in several forms - - sauer kraut, cold-slaw, boiled, and fried. Apples 
were preserved by drying slices (schnitz) and became an unique item of diet, espec- 
ially in pies and in stew with boiled ham and dumplings. Sorghum molasses was used 
much in lieu of sugar. And of course, milk, butter, cheese, and eggs were produced 
and consumed. Dr. Rush was of the opinion that the Germans ate too little meat, and 
that, as a result, their strength declined earlier in life than men of other nation- 
alities who ate more meat. Perhaps this was true; perhaps not; and if the Germans' 
strength actually declined earlier than others, perhaps it was because they were more 
prodigal in the use of their strength when they were young and in the prime of life. 

U7 



Early Pennsylvania Dutch farmers used implements such as they had used in the 
homeland - - plov's with wood mold-boards, harrows and rakes with wood teeth, sickles 
for cutting grain, and scythes for cutting hay. However, it was not long before the 
cradle was used in cutting grain. They flailed grain or tramped on it on a barn 
floor to thresh it. Like other colonial farmers they were improvident in the use of 
land; they used new land without replenishjiient of the elements taken from it, except 
for nitrogen produced by growing clover, and when exnausted, they let it lie fallow 
for several years. However, it does not appear that they were behind the general 
agricultural practice.^ of their time, and it is understood that they improved their 
practices as they learned about them - - systematic crop rotation, lime and fertil- 
izer, and improved implements, except that some of the Plain People were slow to use 
certain advanced implements which they thought vess contrary to God's Will. 

A Pennsylvania Dutch farm was a family farm. Hired labor was seldom used, and 
of course there was no slave labor such as in the neighboring Maryland and Virginia 
colonies. In consequence, families were large and everybody worked hard for long 
hours. The TOmen were called upon for field labor, when necessary, and they were 
required to maintain the kitchen garden, milk cows, etc. in addition to their normal 
household duties, including spinning, weaving, and making clothes. The children 
were taught to love work and to fear God, as a part of their religion, and they had 
to contribute their labor at an early age. These work habits had been acquired in 
the old country, where that was required of all peasants in order to survive. 

The ordinary clothes of the Pennsylvania Dutch were plain and made of home-spun 
material - - linen and woolen. In the Summer they did not wear snoes ordinarily. 
Except for the Plain People, their dress clothes were much fancier, and were often 
imported from tneir homeland at considerable expense. Except for the Plain People, 
they loved color bright red, blue, and green in particular. One traveler re- 
ported that he saw men going to church in >'yerstown, now in Lebanon County, dressed 
in a Westphalian manner, with green and blue coats, broad-brim hats, and high boots 
that came above the knee. 

The Pennsylvania Dutch generally used wine and beer, for which their taste had 
been cultivated in the homeland, and also apple cider, but they did not like dis- 
tilled spirits, and there was little drunkeness. Of course this changed in time as 
they became Americanized. 

They were convivial at fekes, Weddings, and on New Year's Eve, and this was de- 
plored by the Lutheran patriarch, the Rev. Henry I-i. I'xuhlenberg. Tney observed church 
holidays quietly, especially Easter and C.aristmas, but generally observed no other 
holidays than New Year's Day - - not even Independence Day, which came during the 
haying season when they were busy. After local militia companies were established, 
as required by law, they used the annual militia days as festive holidays, as well 
as for militia drills. Barn raisings, husking bees, schnitz (apple-slicing) parties, 
and similar work gatherings for mutual assistance, also served as social occasions. 

The Pennsylvania Dutch farmers required some services that they could not pro- 
vide well for themselves, such as provided by millers, tanners, shoemakers, weavers, 
hatters, cabinet-makers, blacksmiths, wagonmakers, and harness-makers, and those 
services were provided generally by fellow German artisans. Industry gradually de- 
veloped in the Pennsylvania Dutch co'ontry, including sawmills, iron furnaces and 
—foundries, rifle-makers, potteries, glass-blowers, brick kilns, etc. The principal 
towns soon became beehives of industry as well as trade, especially Allentown, 

he 



i 



Bethlehem, Reading, Lebanon, Harrisburg, Lancaster, and York. In time, as farmers 
were able to sell more of their products, it became possible and economical for them 
to buy more goods and services and to produce less for their own use. 

Dr. Rush made only a few observations regarding German artisans and tradesmen. 
He noted that mechanics, as well as farmers, aimed to own their homes, and that 
German merchants were uniformly candid in business-dealings and punctual in meeting 
their commitments. He noted that all Germans preferred industrious habits to wealth 
itself, and that they were afraid to go into debt. 

Thus it can be appreciated that the Pennsylvania Dutch were most industrious, 
productive, thrifty, frugal, independent, self-reliant, and honest. In addition, 
they had the other Christian virtues, including tolerance in particular. We know 
also that they had the typical German characteristics of cleanliness, orderliness, 
determination, and obstinacy; and that while they were patient up to a point, they 
could get extremely angry when pushed. These qualities were what made our country 
great. They were long generally considered to represent the American ideal. And 
since the Pennsylvania Dutch had most of these qualities in the highest degree, and 
since they spread throughout the country, they have most certainly had a great and 
good influence in molding the American character. If, in the process of becoming 
Americanized, some of these qualities have become eroded in the Pennsylvania Dutch, 
as in other Americans, it is to be regretted. 

Physically the Pennsylvania Dutch males were described generally as appearing 
muscular and husky, and the females as appearing plunp, rosy-cheeked, and strong. 
They generally had dark hair of moderate growth, light skins, neutral-colored (haz- 
el) eyes, and were a little shorter than their present-day descendants, but those 
characteristics were subject to normal deviations. 

The spoken language of the Pennsylvania Dutch became altered in time to a 
special dialect which, while basically High German, contained a mixture of modified 
German and English words. For many years they resisted efforts by some English- 
speaking inhabitants of Pennsylvania to induce them to adopt the English language. 
They liked their own language, especially intheir church ser-'/ices. The Quakers, 
however, were tolerant, and respected their desire to retain their own language and 
culture. Beginning in the early 19th century, young people asked for the introduc- 
tion of English into their church services and their schools, and this was gradually 
done, with declining opposition in each succeeding generation. And as some of them 
emigrated Vj'estward and lived in mixed communities, they were forced to adopt the 
use of the English language. There are a few older people still living in the Penn- 
sylvania Dutch country who can still speak the dialect, but it will soon become 
extinct. 

In colonial days most of the Pennsylvania Dutch belonged to the Lutheran and 
Reformed Churches. Members of both sects got along quite well together. In many 
places they joined to erect a single Union Church in which services of both were 
"conducted. Generally their respective ministers served more than one congregation. 
Intermarriages of Lutheran and Reformed Church members were common, and brought 
about shifts in church membership, since each new family accepted one sect or the 
other and did not become divided in religion. Baptisms, weddings, and funerals 
might be conducted by a minister of either sect for members of either sect, whoever 
was available at the time. Divorces were abhorred. 

U9 



Ministers were required to keep records of births, deaths, and marriages for 
the State, but fev such records were filed officially. In some instances, more-or- 
less complete church or ministerial records have been preserved in archives of Coun- 
ty and Church historical societies, but a great many records have been lost. There 
are more baptism records available than records of marriages and deaths, because 
baptism was a church sacrament, but weddings and funerals were not. Infant baptism 
was important to the Pennsylvania Dutch; they thought that by baptism their names 
were registered in a way that made them known to God. Baptism certificates, artis- 
tically and colorfully decorated and lettered (in German), were used and preserved. 
Old baptism certificates are prized by some in the present day for artistic wall- 
decoration; it makes no difference that a certificate was not given originally to 
one's own ancestor, but if it was, it is that much more valuable. 

The Lutheran Church in Pennsylvania was supported from the homeland in the be- 
ginning, but the Reformed Church got its support from the Netherlands. As a result, 
the latter did not thrive as well. In later years both the Reformed and Lutheran 
Churches in America became independent, and the German Reformed Church was separated 
from the (Holland) Dutch Reformed Church in America. Shortly before I8OO, some of 
the Pennsylvania Dutch, especially members of the Reformed Church, were attracted to 
and joined certain more emotional new creeds which originated among them - - the 
United Brethren in Christ and two different Evangelical Churches. The United Breth- 
ren have been likened to Methodists, being different originally because of language. 
Other PennsylvaniaDutch, especially those who went West beyond Ohio, became convert- 
ed to other established Protestant creeds when there were insufficient nerabers in 
their respective communities to support a church of the Lutheran or Reformed faith. 
A few, but not many, were converted to the Quakers. A great many descendants now 
have no church affiliation. 

In recent years there have been significant unions of some of the many splint- 
ered Protestant sects, including in particular some of German origin. One of the 
German Evangelical Churches first united with the German Reformed Church, and the 
two later united with the Congregational and Christian Churches (of New England 
origin) to form the United Church of Christ. Another German Evangelical Church 
first united with the United Brethren in Christ, and they are now in process of 
uniting with the Methodist Church (of English origin). The Lutheran Church, how- 
ever, still continues independent and strong, having gained the membership of most 
of the German immigrants in the 19th century in the Mid-West. Members of none of 
the above-mentioned churches have been deterred by their religion per se from adapt- 
ing themselves to general American patterns of living. 

The Mennonites and Amish have clung to many of their ancient beliefs and folk- 
ways, secular as well as religious, and are well known wherever they have settled 
by their plain uniform dress, appearance, and customs. Many of them are still con- 
centrated in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where they continue to make it one of 
the most productive agricultural counties in America. They have not gained adher- 
ents generally, except by birth, and apparently they have had some difficulty in 
retaining all of their young people. The Church of the Brethren (principal branch 
of the Dunkers or Dunkards) still exists as a sect faithful to its original relig- 
ious tenets, but their people have changed their way of life. The Moravians, orig- 
inally centered in Bethelehem in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, and never very numer- 
ous, also still exist. 

Notwithstanding their religion, the Pennsylvania Dutch were originally super- 
stitious and believed in magic, but in this respect they were not much different 

50 



than most people of their time. Incantations, talismans (such as hex-signs), and 
ritualistic recipes were considered to be effective in driving away evil spirits 
and ailments of both man and beast. Formulas for timing planting and harvesting, 
based upon phases of the moon, were among the most-lasting superstitions. 

The early Pennsylvania Dutch believed in only minimal education as might be 
required for simple occupations. A farmer or carpenter did not need more than 
reading, writing, and arithmetic, and his wife did not need as much of that as did 
her husband. It was generally assumed that the children would follow closely in 
the footsteps of their parents, without trying to reach some higher level. Of 
course, they believed that more education was required for the professions, but 
they did not generally consider going into any of the professions, except possibly 
the ministry. Learning farming, housekeeping, or a trade should be from practice, 
and not from books, they thought. Character -building and acquiring a philosophy 
of life was a matter for the home as well as the church. Use of the catechism in 
church schools for children was universal, with graduation by confirmation of ado- 
lescents in church membership. It is suspected thiat retention of such attitudes 
towards education in some Pennsylvania Dutch families in the 20th century may have 
retarded progress of some in the most recent two or three generations in adapting 
to the rapid changes in American life brought about by changing technology, with 
reduced needs for farmers and greater needs for technically and professionally 
trained people in the cities. 

Dr. Rush reported that scarcely a German could not read, but many wives and 
daughters could not write. The number of German publishing houses in Pennsylvania 
is evidence that the Germans read books. There were also a number of German news- 
papers for them. Frederick Klees, in his book, "The Pennsylvania Dutch", states 
that Christopher Sauer's press in Germantown printed the Bible in German in 17h3, 
preceding the first printing of the Bible in English in the Colonies (also in Phila- 
delphia) by thirty-nine years. 

Klees also ennumerates the colleges established by the German churches in the 
Pennsylvania Dutch country, as evidence that higher education was not altogether 
neglected. They included Franklin and Marshall College, Ursinus College, Cedar 
Crest, and Hood College (the latter two for women), established by the Reformed 
Church; Muhlenberg College, Gettysburg College, and Susquehanna University, estab- 
lished by the Lutheran Church; the Moravian College; Lebanon Valley College, estab- 
lished by the United Brethren; and Albright College, established by the Evangelical 
Church. Other colleges have been established by the same churches in other States. 
And there are a number of universities and colleges in Pennsylvania, including some 
in the Pennsylvania Dutch country, established by the State and other churches, 
which have been attended by Pennsylvania Dutch descendants. The Plain People have 
remained less convinced qf the need for higher education than the rest of the Penn- 
sylvania Dutch. Yet the Dunkards eventually established two colleges in the Penn- 
sylvania Dutch country - - Juniata aijd Elizabethtown. 

The participation of the Pennsylvania Dutch in the Colonial wars and the Revo- 
lutionary War has been related in the earlier section concerning early Pennsylvania 
history, but perhaps it may be of interest to mention some outstanding German per- 
sonalities in the Revolutionary War. 

The most outstanding Pennsylvania German in Washington's Army during the Revo- 
lution was the Rev. Peter Muhlenberg of Woodstock, Virginia, a Pennsylvania Dutch 

■51 GtNEALO rlCAL bOClETY 

OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 
0001198 OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 



tsr-n r\ n 



1QR8 



community in the Shenandoah Valley. He was the oldest son of the Rev. Henry M. 
Muhlenberg, the patriarch of the Lutheran Church in Pennsylvania. George Washington 
knew him, and at an early date during the war, gave him a Colonel's commission in 
the Continental A.rwy. In his last sermon in Woodstock, he preached on duty to one's 
country; he concluded: "There is a time for all things - - a time to preach and a 
time to fight - - and now is the time to fight". Shedding his gown and appearing in 
uniform, he called for recruits; he enlisted about 300 of his parishoners. He serv- 
ed with distinction in battle, and was made a Brigadier General in 1777, and a Major 
General near the end of the war. Later he seirved with distinction in the Pennsyl- 
vania State Government and in the United States Congress. His brother, Rev. Freder- 
ick A. Muhlenberg, was a delegate to the Continental Congress during part of the 
war, and later was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. 

In his own way, one Christopher Ludwick, a Pennsylvania Dutch baker from Phila- 
delphia, made a big contribution to the Continental Arny. He became the Army's 
"Baker General", and supervised the baking of bread on a huge scale for VJashington' s 
entire arny, and also for the French Arny, as well, at the Siege of Yorktown. He 
bought most of his wheat or flour direct from the Pennsylvania Dutch. 

Molly Pitcher, a legendary, romantic figure in ftevolutionary War history, was 
a Pennsylvania Dutch girl from Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Her maiden name was Mary 
Ludwig. She followed her husband, John Hays, who was in the artilleiy in Washing- 
ton's arny, serving as a laundress and helping her husband's unit as best she could. 
She was nick-named "Molly Pitcher", because she carried water on the battlefield for 
thirsty soldiers. However, in the Battle of Monmouth (New Jersey) her husband col- 
lapsed from heat exhaustion, and she took his place temporarily in serving a cannon, 
for which she acquired everlasting fame. 

Brigadier General Nicholas Herkimer was a German in the Mohawk Valley of New 
York, but he came from the same stock as the Pennsylvania Dutch. In August, 1777, 
he led a force of Mohawk Valley militia, composed mainly of Germans, to the relief 
of Fort Stanwix, near the present city of Rome; it was besieged by a British force, 
under the command of General Barry Saint Leger, composed of British regulars, Ameri- 
can tories, and their Indian allies. Herkimer's force was ambushed at Oriskany, not 
far from the fort, and a bloody battle ensued. Herkimer was wounded in the battle 
and later died of his wounds. The American militia retired from the field at the 
end of the day, but the losses they had inflicted on the eneny contributed greatly 
to lifting the siege of the fort and the withdrawal of the British force to Oswego 
on Lake Ontario (from whence it came), thus preventing it from joining Burgoyne's 
army, which was invading New York from Canada, and thus also indirectly assisting 
in Burgoyne's ultimate defeat at Saratoga. 

The most famous German in the Continental Army was Major General Friederich 
Von Steuben. However, he was not an American by prior residence. A Prussian citi- 
zen and onetime Captain in the Prussian Arny, he succeeded in obtaining an appoint- 
ment by the Continental Congress as Inspector General of the Continental Arny, with 
the rank of Major General. This appointment was niade upon the basis of misrepre- 
sentation that he had been a Lieutenant General in the Prussian Arry. General Wash- 
ington would not accept his presence as Inspector General, which he regarded as spy- 
ing upon him; and he effectively thwarted th^t function by giving the Baron the job 
of training soldiers. He was a good drill-master. Later V.ashington gave him command 
of a division, where he served effectively under the French General, the Marquis de 
Lafayette, in Virginia. After the war. New York State gave him a 16,0'30-acre domain 
in the Mohawk Valley. 

52 



(Mad) Anthony Wayne, whose iBother was Penn^lvania Dutch and father was Scotch- 
Irish, was a Brigadier General in the Continental AmQr. During most of the Revolu- 
tionary War, he conaanded a brigade of Pennsylvania regiments, known as the Pennsyl- 
rania Line. He was brave and daring, even reckless. He won distinction in battle, 
nost notably in the storming and capture of Stony Point on the Hudson River. Several 
years after the war, in 1791, President Washington recalled him to lead a force 
against the Indians in Ohio. He defeated them in the Battle of Fallen Tlnbers on 
the bank of the Maonee River (south of the present city of Toledo a few adles) and 
forced then, in the Treaty of Greenville, to give up nost of Ohio. He died in De- 
troit after taking possession of the forts in the Northwest Territory that the Brit- 
ish had continued to hold until that time, contrary to the peace treaty that they 
had signed at the close of the Revolutionary War. 

It may be of additional interest to name some other Americans of German descent 
who have helped make this country. This will show that German descendants have 
shared in the American ideal that anybody can get to the top if he has the ability 
and character, regardless of his initial station in life or his ancestors' station 
- - quite different from the situation in Europe for so many years. 

Obtaining the Presidency of the United States is the greatest dream of any am- 
bitious American. The last two Republican Presidents have been of Pennsylvania 

Dutch descent Herbert C. Hoover and Dvight D. Eisenhower. And the Roosevelts 

were descended from Holland Dutch ancestors in New York State. Altogether, Presi- 
dents of German-American descent have been in the White House for 32 years of the 
first 60 years of the 20th century. 

Turning to our military leaders, we find that our top General in Europe in both 
World Wars was of Pennsylvania Dutch descent — John J. Pershing and Dwight D. Eis- 
enhower. Pershing's top commander in the field in World War I was General Hunter 
Liggett, of Pennsylvania Dutch descent. In World War II, other top Generals of 
Pennsylvania Dutch descent Included: Henry H. Arnold, Chief of U. S. Aray Air Corps; 
Carl A. Spaatz, Chief of U. S. Strategic Air Force in Europe (afterwards Chief of 
Staff of the U. S. Air Force); Jacob L. Devers, Coinnander of 6th (Bouthem) Grovqp of 
Armies in Europe; and Robert L. Eichelberger, Commander, 8th Anqy in the Pacific. 
Other top officers of German descent in World War II included: Admiral Cheater W. 
Nlmitz, U. S. Navy CcoDaander in Chief in the Pacific; Admiral Marc A. Mltscher, Com- 
mander of the famous Carrier Task Force SB; and General Walter Krueger, Connander, 
6th AxuQT in the Pacific. 

Turning to Industry and coamerce, top leaders in their time have included the 
following Americans of German descent: 

John Jacob Astor came to New York City penniless from the southern Rhineland 
in 178U. He became a fur merchant and later a fur trader. While still young, be 
founded and operated a great fur- trading business with the Indians and mountain men 
in the great northwestern wilderness, and a shipping and trading business with the 
orient. He invested wisely in New York real estate and was the richest man in Amer- 
ica when he died. 

Cornelius (Commodore) Vanderbilt, descendant of a Holland Dutch pioneer (van 
der Bilt) on Staten Island, N. Y., started with a small ferry to Manhattan about 
1810. This grew into a large New York ferry business, then a Hudson-River shipping 
-line, and eventually an ocean shipping line. Ultimately he became a capitalist 

53 



vith a special interest in railroads. He acquired control of the New York Central 
Railroad, became its President, and caused its extension westiiard to Chicago. His 
fortune vas the largest of his tin^ rivaled only by the lesser Astor fortune. 

John D. Rockefeller, descendant of New York German pioneers, went into the oil 
business in a smaU way in Cleveland, when that business was in its infancy. Forsee- 
ing its potentiality, be progressively expanded, especially by acquiring conqjeting 
businesses, until eventually he built the Standard Oil Trust which threatened to be 
a national monopoly. His methods of destroying and undercutting competition (which 
were also used by others in that period) resulted in the development of laws and 
regulation of industry, transportation, and trade to try to prevent monopolies and 
preserve competition, in the public interest. The Standard Oil Trust was required 
to dissolve. Rockefeller became the first billionaire. His fortune, like that of 
many other wealthy men, was used in part for philanthropy. He was the grandfather 
of Nelson Rockefeller, present Governor of New York State, and David Rockefeller, 
President of the Chase Manhattan Bank. 

George Westinghouse, descendant of an early German imnigrant in Massachusetts, 
was one of America's greatest inventors and industrial geniuses. He established 
Westinghouse Airbrake and Westinghouse Electric in Pittsburgh, based i^pon profits 
from his inventions, but his greatest monument is the alternating electric-cunrent 
system (now in almost universal use), which enables long-distance transmission of 
electric energy and more economical use of electric current; in aeconplishing this, 
he had to defeat Thomas A. Edison, who advocated use of the direct current system 
that he had pioneered. 

The Studebaker brothers were early Pennsylvania Dutch carriage- and wagon- 
makers who moved their business to South Bend, Indiana at an early day. Their bus- 
iness became one of the largest of its kind, and their products the best. When 
their business declined, with introduction of automobiles, they established an auto- 
mobile manufacturing business that grew and operated successfully for many years, 
before it closed recently under pressure of coaqpetition. However^ the Studebaker 
Corporation still manufactuz*es a number of other products. 

Heniy Ford, whose mother was Pennsylvania Dutch, was the inventor of the first 
low-priced automobile, and the founder of the automobile business which bears his 
name. He pioneered mass-production techniques that enabled low-cost production and 
high wages to workers — benefits for all American industry, labor, and consumers. 
At one time, first in size in the auto industry, it is now second to General Motors, 
a combination of many of his early con^>etitors . His grandson and namesake now heads 
the business. 

Walter P. Chrysler, descendant of an early New Yoi4c Palatine (named Kreussler), 
started as a machinist, entered the employ of Buick and became a top production ex- 
ecutive. He founded Chrysler Motors, now third in size in the auto industry. Em 
radically influenced auto design and engineering in his time. 

Harvey S. Firestone, of Pennsylvania Dutch descent (Feuerstein), developed the 
great rubber and tire business that bears his name, starting with a YBiy small tire 
business in Akron, Ohio, and growing with the automobile business. The cooquiT' has 
been the leader in its field in product development and quality, and is now second 
in size only to Goodyear. 

5U 



Henry C. Fricke, of Pennsylvania Dutch descent, developed a large coke-produc- 
tion business which served the young steel industry in the Pittsburgh area. He sold 
it to Carnegie Steel Conpany and became Andrew Carnegie's chief operating executive. 
He left a large fortune. 

Charles M. Schwab, of Pennsylvania Dutch descent, starting as a laborer in a 
Carnegie Steel mill, advanced to mill superintendent and eventually to company Pres- 
ident. He became the first President of the successor U. S. Steel Corporation in 
1901, but soon left to become President of Bethlehem Steel, of which he acquired the 
controlling interest. He built up Bethlehem to be chief competitor of U. S. Steel, 

John Wanamaker, of Pennsylvania Dutch descent, starting with a small clothing 
store, established in Philadelphia one of the first department stores. He was a 
pioneer in developing new merchandising methods. 

Frank M. l»foolworth, of pioneer New York German stock, while a young store clerk, 
conceived the five -and -ten-cent store. He opened his first successful store in Lan- 
caster, Pa., the beginning of a chain of more than 1,000 stores in the United States 
and Canada. He and several of his partners each acquired a fortune. 

Henry J. Kaiser, of New York German descent, entered the sand-and-gravel busi- 
ness in Si)okane, Washington, from which he spread progressively into road contract- 
ing, construction of dams and industrial plants, and shipbuilding during World War 
II, in all of which he and his sons and other associates developed new methods and 
achieved fabulous production goals. The great business that he founded was extended 
into the manufacture of portland cement, steel, aluminum, and automobiles. 

Milton S. Hershey, of Pennsylvania Dutch descent, founded and developed the 
leading chocolate company in the United States in a city which he founded (Hershey) 
in the heart of the Pennsylvania Dutch country. 

Jumping to the present day, among the leaders of American industry we find the 
following who are of German-American descent: Frederick G, Donner, Chairman of Gen- 
eral Motors (New York German); Soger M, Blough, Chairman of U, S, Steel (Pennsyl- 
vania Dutch); and Frederick R. Kappel, Chairman of American Telephone and Telegraph 
(Minnesota German - - ancestry probably 19th century). 

In addition to those Americans of German descent who reached the top in Ameri- 
can business, notice should be given to the host of others who have achieved lesser 
success. From obseirvation in Pennsylvania and Ohio, it is believed that they have had 
more than a proportionate share of success in smaller business enterprises. They 
have also entered the professions in strength, including the ministry, but excluding 
law, for which they seem to have had an aversion. Nevertheless there have been many 
who have become eminent in government, including the Congress of the Iftiited States, 

To those who would like to read more about the Pennsylvania Dutch, Frederick 
KLees' "The Pennsylvania Dutch" is highly recommended. Other references: Publica- 
tions of The Pennsylvania German Society and The Pennsylvania Geraian Folk-Lore So- 
ciety; Thomas J, Wertenbaker - "Founding of American Civilization - the Middle Col- 
onies"; Walter A, Knittle - "Early l8th Century Palatine Einigrations"; Ralph Wood, 
Editor - "The Pennsylvania Germans"; A, B.Faust - "The German Element in the 
United States". 

55 



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57 



BRIEF BACKGROUND CF OSBMAM HISTORY 

The German people first appear in recorded history when they repulsed Julius 
Caesar and his invading Roman legions, not long before the time of Christ. At that 
time they were half -civilized barbarians who lived in northern Europe along the 
Rhine River and to the east of the Rhine as far north as the shores of the Baltic 
Sea. They had many of the culture-characteristics of American Indians. They never 
called themselves Germans; that name was first used by the Romans. 

The Germans have been classified as belonging to the Indo-European family of 
people which inhabited most of Europe, and even India and Persia. It is believed 
that they cane originally from far-eastern Europe, but nobody knows. This classi- 
fication of people is based simply upon likenesses in spoken language; it is not a 
racial classification. However, people who spoke a similar language usually had a 
similar culture. In these ways, the Scandinavians and Celts were closely related 
to the Germans. Racially, the Germans have been classified as belonging to the Nor- 
dic race of Caucasians (white people), based upon observed physical characteristics, 
as well as because of the area in which they lived. The other principal category of 
European Caucasians was the Mediterranean race. However, today's anthropologists 
question the meaningfulness of this racial classification of Caucasians. 

At the time of Julius Caesar, the Germans lived in families in tribal groups, 
in areas where the soil was fertile, especially in river valleys. Great forests 
were all around them. They were semi-nomads. Nevertheless, they lived in rude log 
cabins in small villages, and they tilled the soil nearby and kept livestock for 
slaughter for their living. They enjoyed warfare. They had rude cloth and fur gar- 
ments, and primitive iron ia^jlements and weapons, but they also used bows and arrows 
and slingshots. They were monogamous and had a fairly high ncral code. Honor meant 
a great deal to them, but they confused pride with honor; in particular, bravery in 
battle was essential from the standpoint of honor. Loyalty to one's family and tribe 
was also important; this meant obtaining vengeance for offenses. Hence, family and 
tribal feuds were common. They believed in a whole family of Gods, and they had a /i 
nythology about them much like the Greeks and Romans. Their nyths are available in i 
English under the subject of Norse nythology, in idiich the names of the Gods arc 
slightly different. Their Gods were both revered and feared. Everybody considered 
that he had one special God to whom he could look for aid; but some other God might 
be antagonistic. Their Gods were not perfect; they had all of the weaknesses and 
strengths of human beings. They fought among themselves; eventually it was expected 
that they would engage in a final struggle (twilight of the Gods). Aa»ng men, prov- 
en heroes in battle, they thought, would go to a warriors' heaven (Valhalla), there 
to be held for participation in the final struggle among the Gods. Otherwise, they 
thought that spirits of the dead lingered only briefly near the scenes of their for- 
mer lives. They believed also in sorcerers, witches, evil spirits, goblins, etc. 

Before the time of Caesar, the German tribes had driven the Celts from the area, 
and the Celts, in turn, had occupied the area of present-day Switzerland and had in- 
vaded the areas of present-day France, Spain, England, Scotland, and Ireland, where 
they merged with the previous inhabitants and influenced their plysical and cultural 
heritage. Not much is known about migrations which occured previously, but we can 
be sure that there is no such thing as racial purity for any European people. 

The Romans undertook to defend the relatively docile Gauls, whom they had 

58 



conquered (in the territory of modern France), from the menacing Germans, whom the 
Gauls greatly feared, by occupying all of the territory west of the Rhine and by 
building a line of fortifications just east of it. They also occupied all of the 
territory south of the Banube River and east of the Rhine. Thi3 meant that they 
had to conquer the German tribes along the Hhine, principally the Franks and the 
Alemans, who were ferocious fighters. They also had to cope with occasional subse- 
quent attacks by the Germans, including the tribes that lived farther east. 

During the period that the Romans occupied the Rhineland, they established a 
number of in^wrtant towns and brought a hi^er civilization to the German people 
who lived there. The Romans applied their normal methods of colonial control, with 
participation by the inhabitants in their own government, and with recruiting among 
the people for the Roman amy. Thus they secured the loyalty of those they would 
otherwise have had to fight, as well as made colonial administration manageable. In 
the process, they taught civil and military organization and administration; they 
introduced their own advanced system of law and justice; and they introduced im- 
proved military tactics and weaponry. They also introduced improved architecture 
and civil engineering, including masonry construction, and other useful arts and 
sciences, not the least of which was the Latin alphabet, which was used as a basis 
for a written German language. And in the fourth century, having become Christian- 
ized themselves, they began to introduce Christianity among the frontier Germans; 
this process took a long time (it was not coopleted by the Romans during the peiriod 
of occupation). Those Germans who were Roman subjects, greatly admii*ed and respect- 
ed the arts of their conquerors, and their leaders were grateful for the civil and 
military honors and privileges that had been given to them. This attitude of respect 
and admirations for the Romans passed on to the more remote German tribes in the 
hinterland, as they learned about the higher civilization. 

About the year 330 A.D., the Roman Emperor, Constantine I, moved the capital of 
the Boman Enpire from the city of Rome to the city later called Constantinople (now 
Istanbul, in Turkey) at a strategic cross-roads between East and Meat. He was the 
first Christian Enperor, and he decreed reco0:jition of the Christian Church in the 
Snpire, after many years of Roman persecution of Christians. After that time there 
was a clear separation of the Enqpire in two parts. East and Vfest. Gaul, of course, 
was in the western part of the ^npire. However, the Enperor in Constantinople con- 
tinued to be recognized as Qiperor of the whole until the year 800. Most of the 
En^erors after the time of Christ were despots. 

The Raoan Bkq)ire had begun to decay even before the year 330, from internal 
weaknesses, including corrvption, venality, and general immorality, but the process 
of decay and disintegration took a long time. During that time the German tribes 
were restless, and several made extraordinary migrations within the Eiq>ire that not 
only hastened its con?)lete downfall and made it more agonizing, but also significant- 
ly affected the future nations of Europe and their people. These migrations occured 
because of the natural vigor and adventuresomeness of the Germans, but also probably 
because of the pressujre of increasing population and lack of food resources, due to 
limitations of ancient agricultural methods and failure to use effectively all of the 
arable land available in the areas where they then lived. Some of the migrations may 
have followed inter -tribal fighting for the possession of most desirable territory, 
the weaker people being forced to migrate. These migrations sometimes involved con- 
quest, with cruel, vicious warfare. During this period. Borne was sacked more than 
once by barbaric German armies. 

$9 



More important migrations of German tribes included the following: 

Many of the Goths settled ultimately in Italy and in southern Gaul and Spain, after 
having first migrated to the lower Danube River valley. 

The Lombards settled in northern Italy. 

The Burgundians settled in southeastern Gaul and what is now western Switzerland. 

The Vandals settled ultimately on the north African coast, after having wandered 
destructively through Gaul and Spain. Later they ravaged Italy for fun. 

The Franks later conquered all of Gaul, including the Goths and Burgundians, and 
many settled there. France was subsequently named for them. 

Many of the Alemans settled in what is now Switzerland, after the Franks conquered 
their tribe and occupied some of their land in the middle Rhine Valley. 

Angles, Jutes, and Saxons settled in England (named for the Angles) and drove the 
previous inhabitants into the area now known as Wales. 

Some of the sea-roving, piratical Scandinavian Vikings (Norseman or Normans) set- 
tled in northern Gaul, especially in Normandy (which took its name from 
then). Some of their Norman-French grandchildren later conquered England 
and became its rulers. 

Thus the English people (Anglo-Saxons) and a large part of the Swiss people 
are primarily German; the northern Italians have a large infusion of Gennan blood; 
and the people in some parts of France, Spain, and North Africa have some German 
blood. The English language is a Germanic language, but the French, Italian, and 
Spanish languages are Romanic (Latin). Most of the Swiss speak Gei'man and have 
the German culture, but some are French and Italian; they have not mixed very 
much, since they have remained separated in different areas in the main. 

The Franks, who lived originally in the northern Rhine valley, became the 
most powerful and greatest of the German tribes. They established the Frankish 
Kingdom about the year 500 A.I)., and extended it by continuous conquests until 
ultimately, under Charles the Great (Charlemagne), it became an empire which sup- 
erceded the Roman Entire in the West. His empire included all of what is now 
France, Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Belgium, and parts of Spain, Italy 
(northern part, including Rome), Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Jugoslavia. 

In Rome, after the departure of the Enqjeror, the Bishop of the Christian 
Church became the dominant political force, as well as the spiritual head of the 
Church. He claimed to inherit his position from St. Peter, who was alleged to 
have been in Rome when he died. St. Peter was the disciple who Christ directed 
to establish the church and allegedly gave the authority to promise eternal life 
for the faithful. As St. Peter's successors, the Bishops of Rome claimed to inher- 
it his power to grant eternal life; that is, to possess the keys to heaven. With 
this assertion of supreme spiritual authority, the Bishops of Rome came to adopt 
the title "Pope" to signify superiority over all other Bishops. While the Pope's 
position insured that he would have ample wealth and income, he had no military 
force for protection; moreover, if he had such a force, leadership of it would be 
incompatible with his spiritual position. 

60 



The Kings of the Lombards, the Hooan Senate, and other authorities in Italy 
often quarreled with the Popes' asserted authority. More than once, the Popes re- 
quested and obtained military assistance in such quarrels from the Kings of the 
Franks, all of whom were devout Christians. After one of those occasions, in the 
year 800 A.D., the Pope offered to crown Charlemagne as Stperor of a Holy Roman 
Empire of the West. Such a position would require that he undertake to protect the 
Christian faith, including the Pope. Charlemagne accepted and was crowned by the 
Pope in Rome on Christmas day, with the enthusiastic approval of the people in the 
city of Rome. This amounted to a declaration of independence from the old empire, 
which still existed in the East, with its capital in Constantinople. This act, how- 
ever, did not add one bit to the area that Charlemagne had previously conquered. 

The E]i55erors of the Eastern Bnipire never recognized the validity of the separa- 
tion of the Western En^jire, but they could do nothing about it. The iSastern En?)ire, 
sometimes called the Byzantine Empire, lived for several centuries, although it was 
continuously eroded by conquests from without - - in particular, by the Arabs, 
Turks, and Bulgars (a northern Slavic tribe). Its brave fights against the Moslems 
protected Western Europe. The Eastern Entire finally expired in lU53, when the 
Turks captured Constantinople. In the meantime, they had established a separate 
division of the Christian Church, independent of the Pope in Rome; this division, 
called The Eastern Orthodox Church, continued to live after the Eastern ai^jire ex- 
pired. The western division of the Christian Church, under the Popes, became known 
as The (Roman) Catholic Church. 

The creation of The Holy Roman Bi^^ire of the West appealed greatly to most of 
the people within its boundaries, especially to the Germans. They were used to one 
super -nation and greatly yearned for the protection that they thought it would pro- 
vide in that violent age - - peace, freedom from continual warfare and feuds, free- 
dom fi^jm brigands and marauders, orderly administration of justice, and maintenance 
of a healthy climate for growth of the Christian church, with the practice of uni- 
versal brotherhood of men. They considered that the Pope was God's sole represent- 
ative on earth for the protection of their salvation in heaven; as a parallel con- 
cept, they thought that God should have one representative on earth to govern ten?)- 
oral affairs and keep order. They did not woriy about the dangers of tyranny from 
rule by one man; they were used to despotism, and did not know what else could be 
expected. Moreover, they did not expect a need for a government indefinitely; at 
that time. Christians expected that the end of the world would not be long in com- 
ing. In the meantime, they wsuld like to have a partnership between their spirit- 
ual and temporal leaders; they wanted all-embracing unity in all things. It would 
be centuries before these sin^jle idealistic concepts would be recognized as unireal- 
istic, based upon experience. 

Charlemagne was one of the world's all-time, all-around great geniuses, and an 
[ authentic hero, idealistic and devoted to duty, although he enjoyed power and posi- 
* tion, as all such men do. He was a good administrator and made use of talents of 
native leaders in ruling the different states in his empire. He found time to over- 
see administration of public affairs, including justice, although he was often with 
his amy in warfare to extend the en^jire and to put down rebellions of his obstrep- 
erous, serai-wild chief tans. In particular, he had difficulty in forcing the Saxons 
to accept Christianity, but this he did after long brutal persecution. He also 
found time to encourage learning and the arts. Despite his barbaric methods, he was 
a great man for his time, and as might be expected, he would not be followed by 
others equally competent. 

61 



Cbarlemagne acted not only as ruler of the ^^Ire, but also as ruler of the 
Church in the Bi^pire in teii?)oral matters. For example, he appointed bishops and 
removed them for malfeasance, convened Church councils, and- through the state con- 
trolled all church property, just as he controlled the titles and property of the 
nobles of the realm. Ultimately the Popes -would challenge exercise of such power 
by his successors. 

Charlemagne expected that succession to the crovi of Si^eror of The Holy Boman 
Enquire, as veil as King of the Franks, vould be hereditary, but there ims no legal 
basis for such succession (nor for any other, for that matter). Eventually this 
also became a subject of contention between the Popes and the Es^rors, and even 
between them and the people they ruled. 

After Charlemagne died, his weaker descendants were unable to hold the fiqpire 
together. The Pope and the Italian authorities did not even accept his grandson as 
Eiqwror. In fact, his three grandsons, after fighting each other, divided the Em- 
pire into an Eastern Frankish Kingdom (German), a Western FrankLsh Kingdom (French), 
and a smaller middle kingdom between them ruled by the one they finally acknowledged 
to be Eoperor of the whole. Charlemagne's male line died out with a great grandson, 
and his claim to be fiiqperor of the Holy Roman Eiq)ire passed to a Saxon descendant, 
Henry (the fowler). He united the three parts of the empire in theory, and brought 
renewed life to it. His son. Otto the Qreat, succeeded in completing the establish- 
ment of real authority over the entire oz>iginal esQ^ire of Qiarlemagne, except for a 
northern part of what is now France, including Paris. (In fact, no succeeding Eiaper- 
or ever succeeded in reestablishing his authority there, and this is generally con- 
sidered to have marked the beginning of France as a nation.) 

Early in his reign. Otto the Great led an ani(7- that met and overwhelmed a p>ow- 
erf ul invading Hungarian aroy; that battle won undisputed possession of the land 
that later became the German state of Austria. In the year 962, Otto crossed the 
Alps with a powerful army to help the Pope, at his request, in another of his per- 
ennial fights with the Lombards and the city of Ibme. The Italians were cowed into 
submission, and the Pope rewarded Otto by crowning him Bnperor in Rome, thus recog- 
nizing a revived Dq)ire. Again this did not add one bit to the territory under Ger- 
man control, but it made it easier for Otto to exercise control. Otto then forced 
the Pope to acknowledge that he was only one of the Eiqperor's subjects and that, 
henceforth, the election of each successive Pope would require the EoqDeror's approv- 
al. Not long afterwards, the Pope went to France to reside. Otto then convoked a 
synod of the clergy in Bame, tried the Pope on charges brought by the clergy, found 
him both iaaaoral and inconpetent, and named a successor. Then Otto returned to his 
principal capital, Aachen, in the Frankish Kingdom. These actions marked a high 
point in exercise of power by the Enq^erors in a long and bitter struggle with the 
Popes; only once more would an fiQ>eror discharge and replace a Pope. Later a strong- 
er Pope would tea^porarily excommunicate an Saperor and bring him to his knees, be- 
cause excommunication hurt his standing with the people. But it was Otto's insist- 
ence on morality and conpetence of the Popes that strengthened the character of the 
future Popes, I 

After Otto, the Holy Roman £^ire of the West continued to exist until Napoleon 
dissolved it by decree in the year l80U, after conquering all of its ancient terri- 
tory - - a period of more than a thousand years from the coronation of Charlemagne. 
However, for the last half of its existence, it was only a shell. It became Geirman, 
rather than Roman (or European); it became the loosest kind of confederation of Ger- 
man states, rather than an empire; and it was no longer Holy, in the sense of being 

62 



a partner of the Roman Catholic Church. Tet the German people long continued to 
dream of the high hopes they had when it was created, and of the days of glory of 
the engsire (including the original floman Enpire), while their national strength be- 
caaae helpless and France became powerful and tsod all over them, shearing off piece- 
meal much German territory west of the Shine. 

It would be both boring and confusing to go into the ebbs and flows of the for- 
tunes of the Ebipire over the centuides, and the names of the many eo^rors, although 
some of them were both good and able. They averaged much better than the Kings of 
France and Bigland. On3y the highlights of the Empire's history will be outlined. 

First, it would be desirable to describe the political, economic, aiid social 
system that was established in the German states during the middle ages, known as 
feudalism. Under that system, there was a pyramidal hierarchy of nobles, with the 
Enperor at the top. The top ranks of nobility were given originally to the success- 
ors of the great German tribal chiefs (in Franconia, Saxony, Swabia, Bavaria, Lor- 
raine, Burgundy, and Lonbardy) and to rulers of similar major territories. In most 
instances the head of one of these states was called "Duke", and the state was called 
a "Duchy**. In very few instances was it necessary to call the head of the state 
''King**, and his state a "Kingdom**, thus undesirably recognizing him to be on a level 
with the King of the Franks. Such exceptions were Bohemia, Burgundy, and Lorabardy, 
yet in the case of Lombardy, the King of the Fi*anks himself assumed the title of 
King. Each King and Duke swore loyalty to the Siperor and to serve him faithfully 
when required, including provision of soldiers; they were called "vassals" of the 
"Saperor. Similarly each King or Duke possessed the loyalty and right to services 
of lesser nobles, such as Counts (who ruled "Counties") - - their vassals. In turn 
each such noble created lesser nobles (such as Barons), who were his vassals. Each 
noble was given ownership of specific land from the King or noble above him (called 
a "fief"). In case of infidelity or failure to meet his obligations to render ser- 
vice, his fief could be declared forfeited by his superior and repossessed. The 
title of each noble, as well as his fief, was hereditary, and could not be transfer- 
red except by forfeiture, or by reversion to the overlord, if the male line died out. 

Most nobles had strategically-placed castles that served as forts, as well as 
residences. Ultimately there were about 10,000 castles in the German states. The 
ruins of many still exist; a few are still used. Each castle had its own chapel, 
its service facilities, and its nearby supporting farmlands, pastures, and wood- 
lands. Each castle unit was self-sufficient economically, politically, and social- 
ly for many years. The higher nobles were served by officials and a small standing 
military force, each of noble rank. All of the nobles in each castle were served 

by peasants in the castle, in their service facilities (such as the mill and 

blacksmith shop), and on their farms, in the production of food, materials for clo- 
thing, etc. They were served by members of the clergy in the education of their 
children, as well as in religious matters. 

Most of the peasants were fanners; as a general rule, they lived in a village 
near the castle. They were like tenant-farmers. Each had a strip of land allotted 
to him for growing his own crops, and he had rights to use the lord's woodland to 
gather wood, and to use the common pasturelands for grazing his cattle and maintain- 
ing his hogs. In return, he had to give part of his time to work on that part of 
the lord's farmlands that he held to supply his own needs, and to labor on other 
projects of the lord. He also had to pay fees for the use of pasture and woodland 
and to hunt in the forest. He was required to use the lord's mill, blacksmith shop, 

63 



etc., and if he desired to sell avy of his products, he first had to offer them for 
sale to the lord. There vere other assessments against the peasants. Including 
tithes to support the church maintained for them, contributions for the marriage 
dowries of the lord's daughters and for the cereotonles Involved in bestowing knight- 
hood on the lord's sons, death taxes, etc. Peasants also would be subject to fines 
If found guilty of misdeamors In the lord's court. During the early middle ages, 
i>ents, fees, etc. were payable principally in goods and services; later there were 
some payments in money. 

Most of the peasants were bound to serve their lord and could not choose to 
serve another. The lord might sell them to others. If he' chose. They were true 
serfs. However, some peasants were free men. The major difference between the 
free and unfree was that a free peasant could leave. If he chose, to become a ten- 
ant for some other lord, or to go to a city to live. Unfree peasants might obtain 
ten?x>rary freedom by paying a tax proportionate to the period of freedom. They 
might obtain permanent freedom by voluntary action of the lord, or by purchasing it 
(if they could obtain the money), or they might escape and go to a city, In *4ilch 
residence for a year would allow them freedom, provided they were not caught and re- 
turned to their lord in the meantime. A peasant's sons Inherited his class status, 
free or unfree. 

Peasants, however, did have certain rights and benefits, in addition to the 
goods they could produce for themselves on the lord's land. They were entitled to 
ownership of personal property, to housing for their families and their animals, to 
protection from marauders, to justice in the lord's court in case of offenses by 
others, and to maintenance of sIb^jIb human dignity. They were also exen?)t from mil- 
itary service, at least until later years. A peasant's personal property was sub- 
ject to inheritance by his sujrvlvors (subject to the death tax) and the oldest son 
Inherited the right to take over his father's strip of farmland (but not If his 
father was a fi^e man). 

Under this system, peasants were forced to work from dawn to dusk, six days a 
week, in order to make a living. And the women had to work in the fields, as well 
as the men. It was this life that made them strong. Industrious, and frugal. 

Peasants were permitted to have only a limited education, and they vere told 
not to be concerned with political and economic matters - - that they were not wise 
enough for that; that they should trust their lord to do what is best. The clergy 
supported that view and told the peasants that servitude was a natural thing for the 
masses; that it was God's will. They tried to keep the peasants' minds on the here- 
after, as an escape from life. The peasants accepted this condition for generations, 
but in time, they became more and more dissatisfied and also resentful of the clergy 
as well as the nobles. When they rebelled, they achieved nothing. 

While the foregoing description of peasant life was generally applicable, there 
were exceptions. For exan?)le, in the Alpine valleys in the south, agricultural pea- 
sants did not live in villages; they lived on individual farms. It is also under- 
stood that there were more free men among the peasants in the eastern-border dist- 
ricts and in Saxony. To induce emigrants to settle in the eastern-border districts, 
peasants in other areas were offered their freedom from bondage. 

The church had a similar system of nobles, consisting of Archbishops, Bishops, 
and Abbots (heads of monasteries), except that those positions were not hereditary. 

6Jt 



They also had landed estates (fiefs) to support their establishments. Originally 
the Emperor appointed them, as well as other nobles, but the Pope later forced rec- 
ognition of his authority to make these appointments. Hovever, the Emperor, and 
later, the heads of the individual states, retained the function of controlling 
their fiefs, in about the same manner as for other nobles. The church nobles had 
their own peasants to serve them, provide their livelihood, and free them to spend 
full time on their church functions, just as the peasants provided the livelihood 
of the lay nobles for public administration, warfare, sport, and leisure. 

In time, as cities grew up with the development of trade, industry, and bank- 
ing, another class of citizens was established for their residents, called "burgh- 
ers". They were a step above peasants and a step below the church nobles. Their 
ownership of land was generally less important than the exercise of skill as a 
craftsman, a merchant, etc. Wiile at first the right to the exercise of such skills 
was under the control of the lord who controlled the city, eventually each craft 
formed a union called a ••guild" which exercised control of its own members. The 
guild established regulations governing quality of the members' products .qualifica- 
tions of a master craftsman and the lesser journeyman, rules of appi^nticeship, etc. 
In this way, the quality of German products became outstanding internationally, and 
the capitalistic system of business enterprise came into being in Germany. An ex- 
tensive system of trading and banking also developed, both locally and inteimation- 
ally. Mai^ of the larger cities became like independent states; they were called 
"free cities". Eventually the guilds and the other burghers became represented in 
city government through membership in city councils, thus establishing the beginning 
of democracy. Education, science, and the arts thrived also in these cities. Yet 
it was seldom that a burgher could become a noble, and for years no noble could be- 
come a burgher. Strangely, feudalism in the rural areas existed for many years 
alongside the con^)letely different capitalistic, democratic system in the cities. 

Each state and free city had its own system of public administration and dis- 
pensing justice, under its own laws. The laws established by the Emperor were few. 
The En^jire had a Council called the "Diet", composed of the principal nobles, but 
it had no real power. 

Knighthood came into existence beginning shortly after the time of Charlemagne. 
Previously the German armies overcame their enemies by weight of numbers of foot- 
soldiers, distinguished by their individual strength and ferocity. About the 10th 
century smaller armies consisting of knights mounted on horses, became more effect- 
ive. Gradually both knights and horses became more heavily arncred. Individual 
knights required servants (squires and pages) to assist them — to care for their 
horses, weapons, and armor, as well as to supply their personal needs. The expenses 
of maintaining knights placed a natural limitation on the number that could be sup- 
ported by the nobles, and hence on the number that could be mobilized by the Enperor. 
Itader these conditions, only nobles could become knights. 'While many knights had 
their own fiefs to support them, others did not, and they depended upon support by 
their liege lords; they were true professional soldiers. 

Since knights were covered by armor, they adopted individual insignia and col- 
ors for identification, especially in battle, where it was important to distinguish 
friend from foe. These insignia becaue the basis for the coats-of-arms which have 
been prized by some of their descendants. 

The Church got into the picture and helped to establish ideals and rules for 

65 



knighthood, including chivalry towards women, charity and assistance to the poor and 
weak, observance of certain rules of sportsmanship in fighting, etc. The Crusades 
were conducted at the request of the Popes by armies of French, English, and German 
knights to redeem the Holy Land from the infidel Moslems. In the 12th century, a 
German annjr, numbering almost 100,000, was led on the Third Crusade by the Enperor 
Frederick I (Barbarossa - meaning "red beard"). He became a legendary figure, like 
King Richard I (the lion-hearted) who led an ariiBr of English knights on the same 
crusade. The Crusades had no permanent success. However, they show something of 
the degree of enthusiasm for Christianity by the Eurojjean peoples of that time, the 
greatness of the need for an outlet for the energies of the semi-idle nobles, and 
their still savage fighting instincts. The history of the Crusades shows that the 
ideals of knighthood had not been extended to the treatment of defeated Infidels and 
their women and children; barbarism still existed in war. 

Eventually, during the l5th century, knighthood became obsolete, as methods of 
warfare changed with the introduction of gunpowder. By the year 1500, German armies 
were coi^posed of foot soldiers with muskets and artillery. Many inqwverished knights 
became robbers and highwaymen, rather than take up faming, with its peasant status. 
Even after knighthood became obsolete, some of the customs of knighthood continued 
for awhile — in England right up to the present day. 

Several of the early German Bnperors after Otto, sought to strengthen their 
hold on &>me and northern Italy by spending most of their time in Rome, rather than 
in Aachen, or elsewhere in the German states. They were unpopular with the Italian 
people, especially when they were living north of the Alps. Whatever the En?)erors 
gained by this, they more than lost through alienation of the German people and the 
results of machinations of the German nobles in their absence. Anyhow, in time they 
lost possession of Borne, the free cities of northern Italy (such as HLlan), and 
eventually most of the rest of northern Italy. 

The Bonperors had found in the beginning that their German princes, who were 
very headstrong, self-seeking individuals, still half -barbaric, were much iispressed 
by the fact that the finperor had an empire which covered most of Europe, and that 
he was the pairtner of the Pope in a holy enterprise. The ideals of the time have 
been mentioned. Therefore, the early Bfq>erors obtained a real advantage through 
The Holy Boman E^ire in ruling the German people. Perhaps they could not have had 
a unified German state very long without the esquire and all that it meant. But it 
eventually ceased to have that usefulness. Moreover, because its existence was 
maintained after it should have been abandoned, the results were catastrophic. 

In the 13th century when the male line of the Onperors of that period died out, 
the German princes began to elect the Esperors, disregarding the claim of the Pope 
to have that authority and abolishing the practice of transmission of the crown in 
an herediteury line. They developed a system of using Electors. There were only 
seven Electors - - the three princes of the Church (the Archbishops of Mainz, Trier, 
and Cologne) - - and the heads of the largest states, except Bavaria (the King of 
Bohemia, the Duks of Saxony, the Count of the Palatinate, and the Margrave of Bran- 
denburg). The Duke of Bavaria was added during the Thirty Years' War in the 17th 
century. The kingdoms of Looibardy and Burgundy had been broken up and parts had 
been lost to the en^>lre. And the Duchies of Franconia and Swabia had vanished when 
their male lines died out; they had been broken up into smaller states by the Enper- 
or, with lesser rank for their heads. The Palatinate and Brandenburg were the larg- 
est of the new states. Thus the lesser states and the free cities (which had become 

66 



increasingly numerous and important) had no voice in the election of the Enroeror, 
but they were given the privelege of making nominations to the Electors. The pow- 
erful position of Elector was of such importance as to result in the conmon use of 
that title by the seven princes, in preference to their normal noble titles. 

The Electors used their power to bargain with the prospective candidates to 
make them agree in advance to relinquish such of their feudal powers as already had 
not been extracted from their predecessors, beginning with the period during which 
the Bnperors resided principally in Rome. And many of the Eaperors, atten^jting to 
secure their succession by their oldest son, would during their reign be subservient 
to the Electors and bargain away powers. By this msatis, the Electors eventually ob- 
tained absolute power for thesiselves in their respective states, and also for the 
heads of other states and free cities (which provided the basis for their continued 
siq>port of the Electors). Of course, this destroyed all power of the entire. 

France and England did not fall into this anarchistic trap, probably because 
each started from a much smaller beginning and built up gradually. In France, it 
was the Counts of Paris, the Capet family, who eventually became the Kings of France, 
by extending their fiefs by marriage, by never dividing their territories between 
the heirs of a deceased Count, and eventually by war and negotiation. From the be- 
ginning they maintained direct relations with subvassals, keeping their direct loy- 
alty without dependence upon intermediate nobles. The intermediate nobles were al- 
lowed to function as governors, but appeals to the crown were encouraged against 
oppressive acts of crown vassals, thus undermining crown vassals' authority. The 
Counts of Paris also exploited their rights to property confiscation, reversion, 
and resdistribution. In &gland, the Kings also took similar steps; in particular, 
they made all subvassals, as well as vassals, do homage to the King, and they out- 
lawed all wars between vassals, so that no vassal could Increase his fiefs and indi- 
vidual power by means of force. 

In practice, the Electors always selected one of the Hapsburg family to be Em- 
peror, although theoretically asy Christian of noble birth was eligible, whether or 
not be was a German. In fact, onie of the French kings and one of the English kings 
were nominated and considered as candidates at different times. 

The Hapsburg &g^>erors accepted the situation, and they did little for the Em- 
pire. The position became significant only as an honor, because it was a symbol of 
one-time glory and ideals. Each En^eror derived his financial support largely from 
his own feudal estate, and he gave his attention principally to advancing his own 
wealth and position and that of other members of the Hapsburg family. Many were the 
head of the newer southeastern German state of Austria (Osterreich - - meaning, 
"eastern country"). Austria eventually became a separate empire and great power in 
Europe. Although Austria was the basic seat of power of the Hapsburgs, they spread 
into positions of power in other states in Europe, including France and ^in, by 
means of marriages. 

One of the Hapsburgs, the Sap^ror Frederick III (lla5 - lU93), will be mention- 
ed bare, because he was the one who authorized the knightly coat-of-arms for Hans 
Bortnor and his sons, Hans and Paul, in the year lU5U. Originally he was Duke of 
Styria and Carinthia (later part of Austria). He was made ffli?)eror by the Electors 
in lUUO, but was not crowned by the Pope in Rome until 11*52. To obtain the Pope's 
coronation, he first had to pledge obedience of the German people to the Pope. The 
ElectoTB were unhappy with him, because of that pledge to the Pope, his failure to 

67 



attend meetings of the Diet of the German princes, and his •weakness in handling re- 
bellious subjects in Austria and Switzerland. Th^ considered replacing hia, but 
could not agree on a successor. Eventually he succeeded in gaining control in Aus- 
tria (but not in Switzerland), and in laying something of a foundation for a better 
reign by his more able son, En^eror Maximilian I (called the last of the great 
knights ) . 

Following Maximilian I came the Hapsburg Enperor, Charles V (l$19 - 1556), who 
also became King of Spain, because he married a daughter of King Ferdinand and Queen 
Isabella of Spain (famous in the story of Columbus). He had to cope with the Pro- 
testant Reformation in the Empire, as will be related. 

The German lay-nobility and peasants had long been unhappy with the increasing 
power of the Soman Catholic Church and its extensive acquisition of land to support 
an ever-inci^asing horde of monks and nuns, as well as the clergy. The lay-nobles 
also resented the Pope's interference in political matters. There was also dissat- 
isfaction among the peasants, stemming from their oppression, with indirect resent- 
ment of the Church, because it supported the feudal system as being in the natural 
order of things, and because it benefitted therefrom. Hence, when a German August- 
inian monk, named Martin Luther, challenged the sacred doctrines of the Church, he 
had many followers, including the heads of some of the German states and free cities. 
The principles involved, the struggles that followed, and the results, are fascinat- 
ing history, which can only be briefly outlined here. 

Luther's main contention was that the church was bascially in error in its whole 
system of confessions to priests and penances required by sinners. He held that, 
according to the Bible, man can obtain salvation (eternal life in heaven) by faith 
alone, based upon God's grace and the sacrifices of Jesus Christ for aankind. In 
particular, he criticized penances by good works, and specifically the obtaining of 
money thereby for the Catholic Church ("sales of indulgences", he called them). This 
struck at the foundation of authority that the Church had established and used for 
centuries; hence, the Pope accused Luther of heresy. After a trial, Luther was 
found guilty and was excommunicated. He narrowly escaped execution by fleeing to 
another Geman state and hiding in the castle of a friendly noble for a year, while 
he gathered such powerful support as would insure his safety. 

Luther was not the first nor the only Christian reformer of that period. For 
exai^le, almost a century before, John Huss, a Czech-nationalist professor in the 
University of Prague, in the Kingdom of Bohemia, had advocated certain religious re- 
forms in Bohemia, had been tried for heresy, found guilty, and burned at the stake, 
with the approval of the German Erq^eror. But that did not stanqp out his ideas among 
the people. The Moravians, some of whom came to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, many years 
later, were among the descendants of the Hussites. 

In the middle ages, a heretic was considered to be a traitor to the Church, be- 
cause he had violated his vows to accept the Church's creed that he had taken volun- 
tarily when he became a member. The general view at that time was that excommunica- 
tion by the Church was not enough for a traitor; he should be punished as a traitor 
to the state also - - the degree of punishment being proportioned to the crime. Tor- 
ture of heretics was comnon; death, especially by burning, was not infrequent. The 
same contrary ideas in a non-Christian was not heresy, and was not so punishable. 

Lutheifs most powerful supporters, the heads of soiaa of the independent states 

68 



and free cities, formed a league to support him. They were soon required to battle 
the anny of the Enperor, Charles V, who was determined to eradicate the church- 
reform movement, not only because he was sworn to defend the faith, but because he 
was a devout Catholic by training and more Spanish than German in his nature. The 
Ea^ror brought a Spanish amy to Germany for this purpose, and he was assisted by 
forces from those states whose princes were loyal to the Catholic cause, including 
especially the Dukes of Bavaria and Austria. The forces of the Protestant league 
were defeated about one year after Luther's death. However, the Protestant princes 
soon regrouped and obtained assistance from King Henry II of France, who was willing 
to fight the finperor and weaken the Empire, regardless of the cause (which, in this 
case, was contrary to his own beliefs). This time the Einperor's forces were defeat- 
ed, and the Emperor, himself, narz*owIy escaped capture. 

There followed a general convention, the Diet of Augsburg, in which the Emperor 
sought to conciliate the Lutheran Protestants. A peace agreement was concluded in 
the year 1555, that provided: (l) the ruler of each German state and free city could 
choose between the Roman Catholic and Lutheran creeds and isqx>se the chosen creed on 
all of his subjects; (2) those subjects who chose a religion different from their 
ruler would be permitted to move to some other territory; and (3) any noble of the 
Catholic Church who might choose to turn Lutheran would be required to surrender his 
land, which would then continue to be held by the Catholic Church (although any 
Lutherans living on such lands might practice that religion). One iD?>ortant reason 
for this compromise was the desire of the Emperor and the Duke of Austria for mili- 
tary assistance by the Lutheran princes in repelling one of the frequent Turkish in- 
vasions of Austria from the east at that particular time. 

Charles V was very unhappy with the Peace of Augsburg. He had had a long dif- 
ficult reign. During the earlier years he had warred successfully with the French 
King and with Italian princes over certain disputed territories claimed by Hapsburg 
princes, and in the middle of his reign his armies had fought and repelled an attack 
by the Turks which threatened to overrun Austria. And throughout his reign, he had 
striven desparately against the rising tide of the Reformation. In the process, he 
had used Spanish troops against his German subjects, and thus incensed even some of 
his loyal Catholic subjects. He felt defeated and resigned; he retired to a Catho- 
lic monastery in Spain. His oldest and ablest son became King Philip II of Spain, 
but he was unacceptable to the German Electors; they chose another son, Ferdinand 
I, to be Enperor. Henceforth, while the German Emperors continued to be Catholic, 
they no longer had an empire with a single religion, the Roman Catholic faith - - 
and this violated a basic concept of the original Holy Roman Enpire. It was symbol- 
ic of the change that no Bnperor after Charles V was crowned by a Pope; henceforth, 
in fact, they were to be En^jerors of a German empire. 

To return to the reforms of Luther that were adopted in the church whose creed 
bears his name: The elimination of the confessional and penances was accompanied by 
reduction in the authoritative character of the clergy. They were no longer to in- 
tercede to Christ, through the Virgin Mary or the Saints, in behalf of sinners. They 
were no longer to enter the private lives of the church members, unless invited. 
Every member was brought closer to God; he was encouraged to read the Bible and 
judge the word of God for himself (although listening to expert interpretation by 
his pastor), rather than to blindly take forgranted the statements of his priest. 
Luther, himself, translated the Bible into German; not the first German translation, 
but one that had superior literary merit and basically influenced the German lang- 
uage. The invention of the process of printing in Mainz a century before by John 

69 



Gutenberg, enabled universal dissemination of the Bible. The reduction in the auth- 
oritative character of the clergy was accongjanied by the e limin ation of an absolute 
monarcly in the church; the Lutheran Church had no Pope. However doctrinal author- 
itarianism was continued, with punishment of heretics - - including physical punish- 
ment by the state for many years. Lutheran reforms also included si»?)lification of 
church organization, elimination of monastic orders, reduction of the sacraments of 
marriage and the funeral to mere religious rites (leaving only baptism and communion 
as sacraments), reduction in the use of religious images and symbols, elimination of 
veneration of religious souvenirs (such as bones of the Saints), and freedom of the 
clergy to marry. 

The Lutheran Church adopted Luther's doctrine that man does not have a free vdll 
to choose the course of his life; that his acts are determined by God's Will; and 
that, in fact, the events of his life are predetermined by God from his birth. The 
Roman Catholic Church held that man had a free will to choose within limits. In 
modem times, the Catholic view has become generally accepted by all Protestants, 
rather than Luther's view. Indeed, the basis of development and progress in the 
Ifaited States has been application of the most liberal conception regarding the 
applicability of free will. Perhaps Luther felt impelled to deny the existence of 
free will, because of the political and social conditions of his time, in order to 
explain the naturalness of injustice and oppression of man (that is, man was affect- 
ed by so mar^ unavoidable evil forces, human as well as natural). Btit even then, it 
would seem reasonable to have acknowledged that man did at least have the power to 
choose between good and evil, recognizing that sometimes, if he chose good, he would 
have to suffer for it. 

Luther's stand against religious authoritarianism actually constituted encour- 
agement of revolt against extreme political authoritarianism (tyranny), although he 
never forsaw it. However, it was so interpreted by the German peasants during his 
lifetime. They felt encouraged to band together to demand and fight for increased 
freedom. The great Peasants' War of lS2h/S in southern and central Germany (not the 
first) followed the peasants making demands for abolition of serfdom, the tithe, and 
the death tax; free use of pastures, woods, and water; free choice of their own pas- 
tor*. During this war, the peasants destroyed much property and killed many people, 
but they were subdued by superior force and subjected to terrible vengeance. Maiy 
thousands of peasants were slain, and many thousands were tortured and crippled for 
life. Luther, himself, opposed the revolution and angrily called for its suppress- 
ion in blood, although he acknowledged there were good reasons for conqilaints. The 
peasants were shocked by Luther's attitude, and they said that he advocated a relig- 
ion only for the nobles, not for the common man. 

Lutheranisa spread rapidly throughovit Germany, excluding Austria, Bavaria, a 
few of the small states and the cities which were under political control of Catho- 
lic Archbishops and Bishops. It also spread quickly to the Scandinavian countries. 

A second Protestant Pleformation, generally known later as Calvinism, occured 
in Switzerland at the same time as the Lutheran Reformation. 

The Swiss Confederation began as a league of three small German Alpine cantons, 
solely for defense against their tyrannical local overlord, who was one of the Haps- 
burg family. In the year 1315, they were forced to defend themselves against the 
Hapsburg Knights; they won the battle with a peasant aray. The Confederation soon 
admitted several cities, including Zurich, Bern, and Luzem. Since certain of these 

70 



cities vere in Austrian territory, Austria sent a force to break up the Confedera- 
tion; again the Swiss forces won. Over a period of years, other cantons and cities 
were admitted to the Confederation, including some of French and Italian character 
in the west and south; and other wars followed with Austria and the Duchy of Bur- 
gundy, in all of which the Swiss were victorious. Eventually Swiss indpendence was 
recognized by a peace treaty with Austria in lk99, but the Confederation remained 
part of the Empire for another century and a half. 

The Swiss reformation began in the great cathedral in Zurich, where the Roman 
Catholic priest, Ulrich Zwingli, not only preached a reformed creed, but changed the 
methods of worship, after first selling his views to the city council. His ideas 
were much like Luther's. In fact, when Luther and Zwingli were brought together in 
the year 1529 by a German prince, in an atten?)t to have them harmonize their differ- 
ences and perhaps work together, they agreed on almost everything except the charac- 
ter of Communion. Luther accepted the ancient Catholic myth that the bread and wine 
were actually Christ's body and blood, while Zwingli adopted a rational concept that 
the bread and wine were only symbolic, and that Christ was present only in spirit. 
Despite Zwingli 's greater rationalism generally, he agreed completely with Luther on 
the subject of the non-free will and predestination. But it was for such differenc- 
es that Protestants split into a number of different churches. Not all of the early 
Protestants accepted the need for differences in creeds that arose. We can sympa- 
thize with the opinion of many of our early Pennsylvania Dutch ancestors, who were 
reported to have said that they saw no more difference between the Reformed and 
Lutheran Churches than between tweedle-dum and tweedle-dee. 

Aside from their formal religious creeds, there is one other belief of the sub- 
sequent followers of both Luther and Zwingli that deserves mention. In later years 
it became known as the Protestant Ethic. This is the conviction that it is Ciod's 
Mill and pleasure that mankind should be industrious, thrifty, and frugal. 

Zwingli served as Chaplaign of the Swiss amy in one of the wars with the Aus- 
trians, and died on the field of battle. Peculiarly, the Austrians were joined in 
that battle by peasants from some of the Swiss rural cantons which were still de- 
voutly Catholic, in order that they might help stamp out the Zurich heresy (which 
of course was not done). 

Zwingli 's teachings spread rapidly throughout the Swiss Confederation. And in 
Geneva, a French refugee, named Jean Calvin, led the movement with great vigor, and 
a Scotchman, nai»d John Knox, becane his disciple and carried the movement back to 
Scotland. It is Calvin's name, rather than Zwingli's, that was given thereafter to 
this second major division of the Protestant Reformation; possibly because his name 
is siii¥)ler. However, the name Calvin does not appear in the names of the various 
branches of this division of Protestant churches; they have many names, and they 
differ for the various countries in which those churches were established - - the 
Reformed Church in Switzerland, Germany, and Holland; Huguenots in France; the Pres- 
byterian Church in Scotland and Northern Ireland; in England, the Puritans and the 
Congregational and Baptist Churches (collectively also called "separatists" from 
the English orthodox church, which was the Church of England). The Church of Eng- 
land (Episcopal Church in the United States after the Revolutionary War) originally 
was much like the Lutheran Church in creed, but later made changes under the influ- 
ence of Calvinism. 

The Reformed Church soon became the official church of some of the other German 

71 



states and free cities, most notably the Palatinate and Brandenburg, vhose princes 
vere anong the seven Electors of the Enperor. The official position of this church 
-was not protected by the provisions of the treaty of Augsburg, and thus nev and ad- 
ditional religious friction was generated, primarily with the Catholics, but inci- 
dentally with the Lutherans. Although none who belonged to other churches were 
forcefully driven out of the states and cities which adopted the Reformed Church, 
there was discrimination against them, especially by the use of government resources 
to subsidize the Reformed Church and by seizure of soiae other church property. Nat- 
urally there were some antagonistic feelings between even the Lutheran and Reformed 
Churches . 

The introduction of Calvinism into the Northern Netherlands provided a spark 
that led to their independence. The Netherlands, or low countries, had originally 
consisted of a number of small states in the Prankish Kingdom. By one means or an- 
other, they had been acquired over the years by the French Duchy of Burgundy (and 
thus became detached from the Holy Roman &iqpire. (The Duci^ of Burgundy, in north- 
eastern France, was never part of the ancient Kingdom of Burgundy, which lay in what 
is now southeasteim France.) By marriage, inheritance, and international agreements 
the Netherlands had come to the Etaperor Charles V and to his son, King Philip II of 
Spain, separate fivm the Duchy of Burgundy. The Netherlands then included southeini 
states which comprise modem Belgium; they were more French in character than German, 
unlike the wholly-Gernan northern states which comprise the modern Netherlands. King 
Philip II established a tyrannical military dictatorship in the Northern Netherlands 
to suppress rising Protestantism, and that brought on a revolution. Seven of the 
northern states, led by Holland and Zeeland, joined together to resist the Spanish 
tyrant, and in the year 1579 they declared their independence, under the leadership 
of a German prince, William of Orange (the first of that line) . There was inter- 
mittent warfare for seventy more years before their independence was recognized, but 
during most of that period the Netherlands was independent in fact and it became a 
great maritime power. Defeats of the Spanish navy by the English fleet, as well as 
by the Dutch fleet, contributed to an early Spanish withdrawal. 

A third manifestation of the Protestant Reformation was in the Anabaptists. In 
the German states, including Switzerland and Holland, Lutheranism and Calvinism 
stimulated more radical members of the clergy to advocate even more sweeping changes 
in religious, and sometimes in political and social,institutions and customs. One 
of the few common denominators of their opinions was the concept that only believers 
should become members of the church; hence, that only adults who are old enough to 
be responsible should be baptized as members of the church, upon taking their Chris- 
tian vows at that time; and hence, infant baptism should be abandoned, except possi- 
bly as signifying only the giving of a name. However, some also held radical views 
on political, as well as religious freedom, and they helped to encourage the peasants 
to revolt. Some believed in more personal liberty, including polygaay. Because of 
extremism and fanaticism of many, the German people, Protestants as well as Catholics 
abhorred all of these sects and lunped them together under one title, "Anabaptists'*, 
which was the most reprehensible religious epithet that they could think of. That 
epithet had been used in early times by the Bishop of Rome to stigmatize a certain 
group of early Christians who held similar views on baptism. 

The Anabaptists did not survive, but some of their ideas did. In the area of 
religion, their concept of baptism later affected the practices of many churches, 
especially the Baptist Church. The Mennonites are the only exanqjle of a con^srehens- 
ive continuance of their purely religious beliefs, although modified. 

72 



The Mennonltes vere a Christian sect which originated in northern Germa^jr In 
the saddle of the l6th century and spread throughout the German states. The sect 
nas founded by a fomer Catholic priest^ a Hollander named Menno Simons. His funda- 
mental ideas were clear and definite; they have survlTed among the Mennonltes down 
to the present day, although they have divided into a nuodber of sects, including the 
Anish, who differ on details. He not only opposed infant baptism and believed in 
adult baptlsK upon profession of faith, but he advocated a rigorous adherence to the 
teachings of Christ in living here on earth, including in particular, living a simple 
austere life, with love of one's feUow-man, non-violence, and no killing — and 
this xeans no personal killing and no participation in grot^ fighting, including war- 
fare. (The Quakers agree with these principles.) There are other special beliefs of 
a doctrinal nature, some insl^if leant and some merely curious (such as refusing to 
take an oath or assume office as a government official) and some with which we must 
generally take exception, such as opposition to science and advanced education, (^le 
should respect and be ijspressed with their stands against materialism, violence, and 
killing; perhaps they are right on these subjects and other Christians are wrong. 

Returning to the Geman S^pire in the early 17th century, we fiiid that it was 
composed of alnost 300 states and free cities, each virtually indepvuHent. The Sm- 
peror was no isore than a figure-head, symbolizing a theoretical unity that had long 
since ceased to exist. Germany was not only fragmented and disunited, but was al- 
most in a state of anarchy. The intensity of antagonism between Catholic and Pro- 
testant states and cities had led to the creation of two opposing confederations: 
the Protestant Ibiion and the Catholic League. Civil religious war was approaching. 

Events in the Kingdom of Bohemia soon led to the terrible Thirty Years' War 
(1618 - 16U8). The Esoperor and his Hapsburg relatives atteoqpted to force the Bohem- 
ian Diet to accept, as their next King, a member of the Hapsburg family; their main 
purpose being to suppress rising Protestantism in Bohemia through him. The Diet, 
conqx)sed of the Bohemian nobles, traditionally elected their kings. They rejected 
the Hapsburg and offered the crown to Frederick V, the young Calvlnlst Elector of 
the Palatinate, who was also head of the Protestant Union. He accepted. He was 
subsequently called the Winter King, because he was the ruler of Bohemia for less 
than a year. Both he and the Bohemian nobles knew there might be war, but they ex- 
pected assistance from England, because he had married a daughter of King James I 
of England. 

The Catholic League, under the leadership of the Emperor, imaediately started 
war. Their am^r, conqposed mainly of Bavarians led by a General Tilly, invaded Bo- 
hemia, defeated the Protestant army, dethroned Frederick, and placed the Hapsburg 
nominee on the Bohemian throne. The new king confiscated the lands of Protestant 
nobles, ruthlessly suppressed the Protestant religion, and gave the Bohemian Pro- 
testants the choice of accepting Catholicism or leaving the country, pursuant to the 
terms of the treaty of Augsburg. Some of the Lutheran states and cities, including 
Saxony, had not joined the defense against the Catholics, despite their membership 
in the Protestant Union; they were half -antagonistic to the Calvinists, as well as 
afraid of Catholic power. Nor did England join in defense. The Protestant am^r was 
driven into the Palatinate, where it made an unsuccessful stand against the Catholic 
annsr, which had now received the addition of a Spanish army sent by their king to 
assist his Hapsburg relatives. Frederick found temporary refuge in the Netherlands, 
and the Protestants in the Palatinate had to face reversion to Catholicism or leave 
the country. 

73 



At this point the war might have been ended ^ vith all Qerman Protestants com- 
pletely at the mercy of the Catholics. But fear of re-Catholization of Germany re- 
sulted in the declaration of intent to support the Protestants by the Protestant 
countries of Denmark, England, and the Netherlands. Support by the latter tvo did 
not amount to much, but the King of Denmark soon sent an aray to assist the remain- 
ing Protestant aray. The Catholic armies vere now strengthened by a new amy of 
mercenaries recruited and led by a Protestant Bohemian noble named Wallenstein, uho 
sought his own agrandizenent. The combined Danish-German Protestant armies were 
overwhelmingly defeated, and Wallenstein proved that he was a military genius. But 
he would never obtain the Emperor's trust and confidence. 

Again the war might have been ended, but new support of the Protestant Ifaion 
sustained it. By this time the Lutheran princes, including the Duke of Saxony, gave 
full support to the Union, fearing the result for themselves if there were a total 
Catholic victory. Then also, Gustavus Adolphus, King of Lutheran Sweden, cane to 
the rescue, with financial assistance from France, although not with the full accept- 
ance of the German Protestant princes, because they feared that he wished to annex 
some German territory. Gustavus proved to be a military genius to rival Wallensteini 
he led his well-trained and better-equipped army, with the aid of the German-Protest- 
ant armies, through a series of victories over the Catholic armies of Tilly and Vbl- 
lenstein and their Spanish ally. However, both Gustavus and Tilly died in battle, 
and Wallenstein was assassinated by some of his own mercenaries. But not before the 
Protestants had regained control of all of their lost territory and had invaded Ba- 
varia. Success did not last long after the death of the Swedish king, and they lost 
most of their gains to the Catholic armies. At this point, the Enperor negotiated a 
peace treaty containing mild terms, with the Protestant Electors of Brandenburg and 
Saxony, but it was not accepted by the other Protestant princes. 

Now, at last, the French intervened directly on the side of the Protestants, 
pretending to save them from the Uapsburgs. The French King's minister, the Machia- 
vellian Cardinal Richelieu, controlled French policy. Although he was a Catholic 
prince and was responsible for persecuting Protestants in France, be allegedly set 
out to defend German Protestants in their freedom of religion. Actually it was 
French policy to do anything they could to weaken the Hapsburgs, the Empire, Aus- 
tria, and Spain. Besides, it was their object to gain some German territory. After 
several bloody years, the combined French-Swedish-Qerman armies finally defeated the 
Catholic forces, but both sides had had all the punishment they wanted to take. Dur- 
ing this period, the French had also warred with the Spanish. 

The Peace of Westphalia, which followed, reflected French and Swedish object- 
ives, as well as peace terms between the German Catholics and Protestants. As be- 
tween the latter, the treaty provided as follows; (l) Henceforth the Calvinist Re- 
formed Church would be subject to the same privileges as the Lutheran Church and 
the Catholic Church under the Peace of Augsburg — each to have equal rights. (2) 
Secularized church lands were to remain in possession of those who held them in the 
year 162U (meaning that the Protestant princes would retain much of the land that 
they had previously taken from the Catholic Church, but the Catholic Gtiurch would 
keep all that they had been able to recapture during the first six years of the war, 
as in the Palatinate and Bohemia). (3) Bavaria would retain the part of the Palat- 
inate it had seized during the war (the l^per Palatinate, to the east of the remain- 
ing Palatinate and north of Bavaria). The other provisions of the treaty included 
the following: (1) Observance of all provislomof the treaty would be guaranteed and 
supervised by France and Sweden (a clear infringement of the Eiqplre's sovereignty). 

Tk 



(2) The independence of the Swiss Confederation and the northern Netherlands vas 
recognized. (3) France vrould receive the church states (cities) of Metz, Toul, and 

Verdun in Lorraine (which it had seized several years before the war this gave 

it a clear title), (h) France would receive all of the Hapsburg possessions in Al- 
sace. (The boundaries of such possessions were complex. Eventually the French 
would succeed in talcing over all of Alsace, stretching their territory to the Rhine 
River, south of the Palatinate to the boundary with Switzerland.) (5) Sweden would 
recive from Brandenburg the church states (cities) of Bremen and Verden and the 
western part of Pomerania, giving it land on the south shore of the Baltic Sea and 
along the Lower Oder and Elbe Rivers. (Later Sweden was forced to return it by a 
stronger Prussia, which superceded Brandenburg.) (6) The German North Sea and 
Baltic ports of Hamburg, Bremen, and Lubeck were made free ports, but Sweden and 
Denmark won a degree of control over them. (This too, did not last.) (7) Branden- 
burg received certain lands in the Elbe River Valley (previously owned by the Cath- 
olic Church), and a guarantee of its territorial rights in Eastern Pomerania, in 
consideration for giving up to Sweden its claim to Western Pomerania. Brandenburg 
thus became the largest state in the empire except Austria. 

The Thirty Years' War was one of the most important milestones in the long 
struggle for religious and political freedom in Western civilization, costly though 
it was. It was the last of the civil religious wars in Germany, and the foundation 
for German religious freedom. History shows that establishment of religious freedom 
generally preceded establishment of political freedom. Thus this civil war was even 
more meaningful than the Civil War in the United States, more than two centuries 
later, because its consequences were more universal. The benefits of the Protestant 
Reformation were preserved for all mankind, when they were threatened with coaplete 
destruction. Except for the German and Scandinavian states and Hungary, Protestant- 
ism was crushed forever in all of Continental Europe by despotic combinations of 
Catholic Church and state power. In France, after long years of milder struggles, 
the infamous King Louis XIV, in the year 1685, gave French Protestants the choice of 
accepting Catholicism or leaving France. Those who chose to keep their faith fled 
to the German states. In England, the Protestant Church of England remained under 
the absolute control of the Kings of England for some years; not until Cromwell's 
revolution did the Calvinists gain a foothold there. In Scotland, the struggle to 
establish the Calvinist Presbyterian Church was not quite as difficult. Whether 
Protestantism, which originated in the German states, could have been maintained any- 
where, if it had been destroyed there, may be questioned. While there was never any 
apparent danger of its destruction in Switzerland, that would have been a small base 
from which to spread, or maintain the faith. And the Netherlands was long in danger 
of destruction of Protestantism by Catholic Spanish tyrants even more determined 
than the German Einperor and those powerful German princes who continued in the Cath- 
olic faith. 

The Peace of Westphalia also served to declare German independence from the 
Pope and to provide the example for future independence of all nations from the 
Pope. Thus the German people, who originally created in The Holy Roman Empire the 
combination of Catholic and secular power, finally led the way in separating it. 
The Pope did not like this new condition, and he declared the peace terms null and 
void. However, the German Catholic princes accepted the peace terms, because they 
had to . It was ironic that this condition was created and insured for the future 
upon the basis of French Catholic power. 

It was true legally, of course, that freedom in choice of religion rested only 

75 



in the princes «ho were heads of states and free cities, and not in the people indi- 
vidually. But indirectly they had a choice, even though the consequences were pain- 
ful, because they viere free to move to another state or city which practiced the 
creed of their choice. And despite the general law, it was not long before individ- 
ual freedom of religion was established by edicts of many of the ruling German prin- 
ces, as their hot tempers cooled. It is probable that the long terrible suffering 
of the German people in religious warfare brought most of them to their senses. 

The fact that the war shoved the pitiful weakness of the German states, in com- 
parison with the smaller but unified French nation, did not serve to bring about any i 
movement towards unification and concentration of inherently greater German power. 
The German princes were too selfish individually, and they held their people in com- 
plete subjugation. It would take more than a century of suffering from continuing 
French aggression, before a new able autocratic regime would arise in Prussia to 
lead the German states in a violent comeback, and more than two centuries to estab- 
lish a unified German nation. Yet it was this very weakness that had permitted the 
establishment of Protestantism in Germany in the first place, and eventually, its 
continuance . 

The costs to the German people of The Thirty Years' Mar are sad to contemplate. 
lAiarfare was waged viciously and savagely by armies of both sides; no chivalry had 
been saved from the days of knighthood, if there ever really was any. Armies were 
raised by individual generals; they were fed and clothed by forced requisitioning of 
supplies, and were paid from tributes levied on their enemies. Friendly areas suf- 
fered in maintenance of their- armies, almost as much as enemy aireas. During the war 
the armies fought back and forth over all of Germany (excluding Austria), but Bohem- 
ia, the Palatinate, and Wurttemburg apparently suffered most. Cities were often be- 
sieged, and the inhabitants suffered from starvation; and when the cities were taken 
they were pillaged and burned. Rural areas were similarly treated. Soldiers were 
unrestrained in their mistreatment of defeated eneny combatants and non-combatants; 
murder, torture, and rape were common. Pestilence struck the people, especially the 
plague, and killed many. One estimate was the overall population of Germany was re- 
duced during the war by two-thirds; another estimate was that the population of the 
rural areas was reduced by hO^, and of the cities, one-third. Another estimate was 
that the population of the Palatinate was reduced from 500,000 to 50,000; the popu- 
lation of Wurttemburg, from U00,000 to U8,000. Property damage was incalculable. It 
was said that the countryside, during the later years of the war, became almost a 
desert. It would appear that this war was relatively the worst in history, in terms 
of death and destruction and cruelty. 

The German people, however, have always had immense vitality and energy. They 
went about recreating their rural areas and cities, their agriculture, trade, and 
culture, with miraculous results, such as we have seen in our own lifetime in the 
German recovery from the devastation of World War II. Even their population return- 
ed by 1700 to the pre-war level, it has been estimated. But this was not be the 
last of such devastations; during the next century the French would continue to rav- 
age German territory from time to time, especially in the Hhineland. 

Louis XIV was King of France f rom 161;3 to 1715, having become King when he was 
only five years old. After the death of his Prime Minister, Cardinal Mazarin, in 
1761, he exercised sole power with little advice from his ministers. The phrase, 
'•I am the State", was coined for him. He considered that everything in France be- 
longed to him, including the lives of its people, and that he governed by the will 

76 



of God, and was answerable only to him. He adopted for France the original concept 
of The Holy Roman Entire as to unity of church and state, with one religion; there- 
fore, he eliminated Protestantism in France. He desired to advance the glory of 
France, and accomplished this objective to a considerable degree. He built huge 
palaces, gathered fabulous art collections, and promoted the arts. French art, man- 
ners, and style of dress were copied by all Europe. He sought colonial expansion, 
including in America, and to extend the entire eastern boundary of France to the 
Rhine, which he claimed was the natural boundary. He also aspired to obtain the 
Spanish crown, like Charles V had done, because he also had married a daughter of 
the King of Spain. These ambitions brought France into alnost continual warfare 
during his long reign. He loved war and the fame that it brought. During this per- 
iod, France was the greatest military power in Europe, but its power was not suffic- 
ient to win all of its wars, because of coalitions of other powers whose interests 
he challenged. Huge expenditures for war, palaces, and the arts almost bankrupted 
France. Opposition within France to the absolute power of the King, and the way it 
was used, commenced during the reign of Louis XIV, and grew until finally the man- 
archy was overthrown in the French Revolution in 1789, 

Between 166? and 1672, France succeeded by armed invasion in annexing some 
Spanish-owned cities in Flanders and seized the German Duclyof Lorraine (which is 
north of Alsace and west of the Rhine). In 1672, a French army invaded the Nether- 
lands, with intent to annex all of its territory west of the Rhine. Prince William 
of Orange, commander of the Netherlands army (and later, chief of state in the 
Netherlands), tenporarily defeated the French by opening the dikes and flooding the 
countryside, at the cost of sterilizing the soil for some years. Then he obtained 
help from Brandenburg, Austria, and Spain (the former enei^ of the Netherlands), and 
succeeded in mounting a strong resistance and prolonging the war. Eventually France 
agreed to the Peace of Nymwegen (I678), abandoning its attempt to annex territory of 
the Netherlands, but obtaining some territory previously held by Spain west of the 
Rhine. 

After the French war with the Netherlands, the German En^eror made a new defen- 
sive alliance with Spain, aimed against the threat of French aggression, Inmediate- 
ly Louis showed his displeasure by annexing some more German cities in Alsace, and 
by sending an arny into the Palatinate to plunder and destroy property, and terror- 
ize the inhabitants (167)4). This was called the first devastation of the Palatinate 
by the French. During this invasion and reign of terror, the Count Palatine (Elector) 
was forced to pay money to the French as a tribute. 

During the next few years, Louis contented himself with seizing the rest of the 
German state of Alsace, including Strasburg, its principal city. 

In 1688, Louis again sent an arny into the Palatinate, ostensibly to enforce a 
claim to rule it by his sister-in-law, but actually to gain for France permanent 
possession of the part which lay west of the Rhine. After The Thirty Years' War, 
the Count Palatine had been Karl Ludwig (Charles Louis), son of Frederick V, the 
Winter King, who died during the war. Karl Ludwig had died about 1685, leaving no 
son; a daughter had married the Duke of Orleans, brother of Louis XIV (whose claim 
to the cro>ai was advanced by Louis). This claim was invalid, because, under German 
law, succession in the nobility was solely in the male line. One Philip William, who 
was a cousin of Karl Ludwig, had become the lawful Count Palatine and Elector. 

This time, S'rance faced a more powerful coalition of powers, the League of 

77 



Augsburg, created in the preceding year, consisting of Sveden, Spain, Austria, the 
German En^jeror, and the rulers of several German states, including Saxony, Bavaria, 
and the Palatinate. They came to the assistance of the Palatinate, but were not 
immediately successful in repelling the French, who continued to occupy the Palat- 
ir^te. In 1689, the league was joined by England, the Netherlands, and Savoy (then 
an independent state between France and Italy). With their aid, France was finally 
defeated in 1697, after ten years of fighting. This war is sometimes known as the 
War of the Orleans Succession. 

During this war, the Palatinate was devastated by the French a second time. 
Property destruction was worse than the first time in I67U; it was even worse than 
the destruction during the Thirty Years' War. And the crimes against noncombatants 
by the French army rivaled such crimes during that war, but the population did not 
shrink so much. Many cities and towns were almost completely destroyed, including 
the cities of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Worms, and ^eyer. Historic monuments were des- 
troyed, and art treasures were stolen, if not destroyed. The destruction of Heidel- 
berg in 1693 included burning of the Count's grand castle (one of the most magnifi- 
cent in the ED?)ire) and Heidelberg University (the oldest in the En^jire except 
Prague and Vienna). The old castle's ruins, restored in a small part, may be visit- 
ed by tourists today on the heights overlooking Heidelberg. It is alleged that 
Louis gave the university's library to the Vatican in Rome. In the rural areas, 
crops and animals were taken or destroyed (more than once in many places) and build- 
ings were burned. French armies also invaded and similarly ravaged other parts of 
the En?3ire and the Netherlands during this war, although it appears that destruction 
in the Palatinate was the worst. 

After the combined armies of the Grand Alliance defeated the French in the 
Netherlands, Louis agreed to humiliating terms in the Peace of ^jrswik (l697). France 
was required to give up Lorraine and all other German territories seized during the 
war and iimnediately before, except Alsace. It is said that the terms would have 
been harsher, except for the absorption of the Empire in repulsing one of the many 
Turkish invasions that then threatened Austria. 

Here it should be of interest to pause and tell something about William III of 
England and the Netherlands, who provided both political and military leadership of 
the Grand Alliance. He is an authentic hero in history, because he checked Louis 
XIV, reduced rising French power, protected the Eiqjire and the Netherlands, saved 
Protestantism, and assured future freedom of religion in both the English-speaking 
and the German-speaking world. 

Prince William III of Grange was the son of the second Prince William and grand- 
son of the first Prince William of Orange, both of whom were the elected chief exec- 
utive of the Netherlands ( Stadtholder ) . His mother was Mary, daughter of King 
Charles I of Ekigland. When young, he had poor health and was undersized. With a 
strict Calvinist upbringing, he overcame his physical weakness and acquired great 
self-control, physical and moral courage, and sense of high purpose. He was born a 
few days after his father died, and had no official status in the Netherlands, ex- 
cept as commander of the arncr, when called upon to resist the French invasion in 
1672. Because of his coii?3etence , he was soon elected Stadtholder for life. By his 
statesmanship, courage, and military leadership, he got help and succeeded in thwart- 
ing that French aggression against the Netherlands. 

Prince William married his first cousin, Mary, daughter of Kin^; James H of 

78 



England, and then heiress to the English throne. Later, King James II turned Cath- 
olic and became most unpopular in England, not only for that reason, but also be- 
cause he tried to establish his power over Parliament, in the manner of long-bygone 
kings. After his first wife died, he remarried and had a son, James, who superceded 
his Protestant half-sister, Mary, as heir to the English throne. Prince William im- 
pressed the English king's opposition with his great ability to lead the defense 
against the French; that, combined with his wife's position in the royal line, led 
them to invite him to corae to England with a Dutch amp^ to overthrow James II, his 
own uncle and father-in-law. They had no better way of dethroning James and crown- 
ing William. William accepted the invitation; one of his reasons was to strengthen 
resistance against Louis XIV and his aims. Although he brought an array to England, 
they did not have to fight. A majority of the English people and their survay came 
to his support, and James fled to France. The English Parliament then made William 

their King, and his wife, Mary, their Queen to be joint rulers of Bngland and 

the United Kingdom. This explains how England, as well as the Netherlands, entered 
the Grand Alliance against France in 1689 . 

England was not able inrniediately to go to the assistance of the German states 
in the war then raging in the Palatinate, because the Irish revolted under the lead- 
ership of James II, who they still acknowledged to be their king (they were Cathol- 
ics). King William led an army into Ireland, defeated the Irish array, forced James 
to flee back to France, and ended the Irish rebellion. A faction in Scotland also 
gave some trouble, but it was more easily suppressed. Hence in 1692, when the French 
turned and invaded the Netherlands, William was able to lead the combined forces 
there against the French and defeat them in battle. 

William's final struggle with Louis XIV involved the succession of Louis' grand- 
son to the Spanish throne, of which more later. He died just after that war began, 
so that he did not see the final victory for the causes for which he gave his whole 
life. 

William and Mary were childless, so the English crown passed to the next in the 
royal line. Queen Anne. Her several children all died young. Hence, the crown then 
went to Prince George of the German state of Hanover. George I is of interest, be- 
cause he was a grandson of Frederick V of the Palatinate (the Winter King) and his 
English wife, Elizabeth, and also because all the English kings and queens since 
then have been their lineal descendants. In World War I, the royal family's name 
was changed to "Windsor", because of anti-German sentiment in England. 

In the Netherlands, the den»cratic government they established became combined 
with a limited ncnarchy in the House of Orange. The people wanted to show their 
gratitude to that family, particularly to V/illiam I and William III, for leadership 
in establishing and preserving their independence and freedom, both political and 
religious . 

When King Charles II of Spain died childless in 1701, he bequeathed his crown 
to his descendant, Philip, Duke of Anjou, who was also a son of the heir to the 
French throne (the future Louis XV), but subject to the condition that the thrones 
of Spain and France should remain separate forever. The lawful heir to the Spanish 
throne was Archduke Charles, heir to the throne of Austria (he later became Emperor 
of The Holy Roman Snqsire, Charles VI). This created a great turmoil in Europe, not 
only because of the legal question, but also because, in either case, the balance of 
power in Europe would be upset - - a problem that has troubled Europe continuously 
since Charles V, the German En^jeror, was also King of Spain. France did not want 

79 



another combination of Geraan and Danish power; fligland and the German states did 
not want a combination of French and Spanish power. Louis had his graiidson accept 
the Spanish croim, and he became King Philip V. 

Soon thereafter, Philj^ V granted special priveleges to- French merchants to 
trade in the Spanish empire, such as theretofore had been enjoyed only by English 
and Dutch merchants. Then French troops seized several Dutch forts on the Nether- 
lands' border with the Danish Netherlands (modem Belgium). This seemed to justify 
fears that the French would act in combination with the Spanish, even though they 
did not have one king. Hence, a new Grand Alliance was formed by England, the Neth- 
erlands, Austria, Brandenburg, Portugal, and Savoy. No other German stAe was in 
the alliance, but the participation of Austria naturally meant that the German Em- 
peror was on the side of the allies. Peculiarly, however, Bavaria became the ally 
of the French this time, because of her jealoui^ of Austria. 

lihen the Grand Alliance prepared for war, a French aracr invaded the Nether- 
lands and carried the war to the Allies. The war was fought largely in the Nether- 
lands, the Spanish Netherlands, and Bavaria. Although the German states in the 
Rhineland were not participants in this war, French amies crossed that area in 
their canqjaigns, and in 1707 they again devastated that part of the Palatinate which 
lay west of the Rhine (which Louis coveted). The allied armies, brilliantly led by 
the aiglish Duke of Marlborough and Prince Eugene of Savoy (for Austria), won vic- 
tory after victory over the French-Bavarian armies, the most famous being at Blen- 
heim in Bavaria. Although the French were not conclusively defeated, both sides be- 
came exhausted and negotiated a peace in 1713A, under which Philip V kept the Span- 
ish throne, but renounced his rights to the French throne; and Austria was given the 
Spanish Netherlands, Milan, Naples, and Sardinia. Shortly thereafter Louis XIV died, 
and French power declined. He had accomplished some of his goals, but he had not 
obtained fjossession of German Lorraine and the Palatinate west of the Rhine, nor the 
Spanish Netherlands, nor the portion of the Netherlands west of the R h i n e. 

By the year 1708, the Palatinate had been thoroughly crushed by the recurrent 
devastations by the French armies of Louis XIV. Added to this woe was the return of 
the Palatinate to Catholicism by edict of Philip William, first of the new line of 
Counts (Electors) who came from Bavaria about 1685. The Palatinate had been Protest- 
ant since the year 1556 — Lutheran until l56l, and Reformed after that year. How- 
ever, Philip William was lenient and did not force the Protestants to become Catho- 
lics or leave the country, as he was authorized to do under the Peace of Augsburg 
and Westphalia. His son, John William, who became Count Palatine after his death in 
1690, was different. He seized much of the Protestant church property and gave it 
to the Catholic Church; moreover, he apparently forced some of the Protestant nobil- 
ity to leave the country and seized their lands. let it is reported that in 1705, 
he decreed religious tolerance for all; perhaps this was a belated attempt to repair 
some of the damages to the state. 

It is said that the Catholic Counts of the Palatinate attempted to emulate King 
Louis XIV in their style of living and in the construction and furnishing of their 
palaces - - the new palace in Man nhe im which in 1720 replaced the old castle in 
Heidelberg (destroyed by the French in 1693) > aixj their suoner palace at Schwetzing- 
en. Taxes were increased to provide for such expenditures, and of course the state 
contributed to the extension and maintenance of the Catholic Church from tax reven- 
ues. The tax burden became almost unbearable, especially on the peasants. 

80 



The peasants had been crushed in the Peasants War, as previously related, and 
there is no evidence that their status had been in^jroved since that time. It has 
been noted that one could obtain manumission of his serfdom to emigrate to Anertca, 
provided he paid the tax of up to 10^ of the value of the property he took with hi». 
And it had been true for some time that a peasant could buy his freedom if he could 
get the money, and then he could go to a city and be a free man (eventually even be- 
coming a burgher). 

This brings us to the point in the early l8th centiuy when the exodus from the 
Rhineland began. It adds to our understanding of why the Penn^lvania Dutch came to 
America (see section, "More on the Pennsylvania Dutch"). It also provides a means 
for an increased understanding of the character and culture of the Pennsylvania 
Dutch. In addition, it should provide, ip to a point, a basis for some understand- 
ing of the forces that shaped subsequent German history, and also world history. 

A map of the German states in the early l8th century is provided on page 57. 
The area from which most emigrants went to America in the Idth century is enclosed 
by a fringed border. Boundaries are not precisely drawn, but are approximately 
correct. This map includes the principal states of princes of the Catholic Church, 
such as the Archbishops of Cologne, Trier, and Mainz, and the Bishops of Munster, 
Speyer, and Augsburg. Free cities and very small states are not shown, in order to 
avoid overburdening the map. The principal cities may be found on any modern map 
of East and Vtest Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria, Czechoslovakia, 
and Poland. Also not shown are subsidiary states (states within a state), nor non- 
German possessions of German princes, such as the Kingdom of Hungary and certain 
Italian states subject to the Archduke of Austria and the rest of the Hapsburgs. 



Following is a very brief summary of German history from the early l8th cen- 
tury to the present day: 

The Margraves of Brandenburg, who belonged to the Lutheran Hohenzollern fami- 
ly of southwestern Germar^, assumed the title of King of Prussia, from their poss- 
ession of the state of East Prussia, in Poland. Not long thereafter all of their 
possessions became known collectively as Prussia, Prussia soon became a con^jetitor 
of Austria for leadership of the German states. Prussia emerged victorious, and in 
1871, the King of Prussia also became Emperor of a united German En^jire which ex- 
cluded Austria. The Emperor was also called "Kaiser", which is the German word for 
"Caesar", in memory of the glory of The Holy Roman iaipire. 

The Archduke of Austria assumed the title of Baiperor of the Austrian-Hungarian 
En?)ire after the dissolution of The Holy floman Enpire by edict of the French Enper- 
or Napoleon, in I80U. That empire then included the Kingdoms of Bohemia and Hungary, 
part of Poland, and a number of small states and cities in Italy and the Balkans. 
As a result, the German people therein were outnumbered by peoples of other origins 
— Hungarians, Czechs, Slavs, Poles, Italians, Croats, and Serbs. This was the 
cause of continual and rising internal difficulties, one of which escalated into 
World War I, upon the termination of which the remainder of that empire was frag- 
mented along the lines of racial origin. 

During the remainder of the l8th century, frequent wars continued, but most 
were fought in the eastern part of Germany. France continued to pursue its policy 
of aggression against the German states. It fought Austria in several wars, in one 

81 



of which it acquired the German state of Lorraine (1735). However, for a change, 
France came to the aid of Austria in the Seven Years' War (1756 - 1763) — the 
last of three wars between Austria and Prussia, following Prussia's seizure of Si- 
lesia, then indirectly a possession of Austria. In this fiercely-fought war, Prus- 
sia, under the leadership of King Frederick the Great, took on the combined powers 
of Austria, France, and Russia, with most of the other German states aiding Austria, 
but a few aiding Prussia. The Prussian armies won great victories, but also suffer- 
ed some severe defeats. But Prussia kept Silesia and won the respect and fear of 
the rest of Europe. France's assistance of its old enei^, Austria, was based sinqsly 
on the precept of maintaining a balance of power in Europe by ganging-up on the most 
powerful state. However, England gave financial support to Prussia throughout this 
war, in pursuance of its self-interest against France. While France was kept busy 
on the Continent, England fought her and took her possessions in India and North 
Aserica (the last of the French and Indian wars). 

After the French Revolution of 1789, France followed the same aggressive poli- 
cy against the German states in war after war, commencing even with the revolution- 
ary government in the 1790' s and continuing after the rise of General Napoleon Bona- 
parte to be Emperor of France. Napoleon took advantage of the enmity between Prus- 
sia and Austria to attack and conquer them separately, after which he dissolved The 
Holy Roman &iq>ire, dismembered Prussia, annexed that remaining part of Germany which 
lay west of the Rhine, and remade the map of Germany. But he also did similarly in 
Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. Being defeated by England at sea, he sought to 
conquer her by stifling trade between her and all of Europe. When Russia refused to 
participate in that design, Napoleon led his Grand Army into Russia and suffered his 
first great defeat on land in the Winter snows, when I^ssia adopted a "scorched- 
earth'' policy. Shortly thereafter, Prussia combined with Austria and Russia to de- 
feat Napoleon's reduced aniy and send him into exile. After he escaped and returned 
to France, Prussia assisted Great Britain in again defeating him at Waterloo and ex- 
iling him permanently. 

Some years later, in I87O, the French finperor. Napoleon III, a nephew of Napo- 
leon Bonaparte, undertook to again invade Germany and conquer Prussia. This time 
the Prussian amdes quickly overwhelmed the French armies in a short war, reposs- 
essed Alsace and part of Lorraine, levied a fine on France of about one billion 
dollars, and occupied part of France until the fine was paid (about three years). 
This effectively ended direct French aggression against Germany, but the blow to 
French pride incurred their continued enmity and desire for revenge, and this led 
to the establishioent of a coalition of nations against Germany (France, Russia, and 
later. Great Britain) under the balance -of -power precept, which brought about World 
War I in 1911. 

Prussia, like Austria, enlarged its dcMiain progressively. In the late 17th 
century, Brandenburg had driven Sweden and Denmark out of Western Poraerania and the 
cities ceded to them at the end of The Thirty Years' War, and had renounced the 
overlordshij of Poland in East Prussia. In the l8th century, in addition to taking 
Silesia from Austria, Prussia added to its lands on the eastern border through the 
partition of Poland with Russia and Austria, thus conjoining Prussia proper with 
the rest of the Prussian Kingdom. After Napoleon's defeat, Prussia, with the ap- 
proval of Great Britain and Austria, obtained the Gennan lands west of the Rhine 
(excluding Belgium) which had been annexed by Napoleon; this accession , although 
separated from Prussia by other German states, later became in?)ortant to Prussia 
when it was industrialized. Prussia did not recover German Alsace and Lorraine at 

82 



r 



that time, because neither Great Britain nor Austria would approve. In the mid- 
19th century, Prussia annexed the neighboring German states of riolstein and Schles- 
wig after successive short wars with Denmark and Austria. At the same time, Prus- 
sia peaceably annexed the German states of Hanover, Nassau, and Hesse-Cassel, and 
the free city of Frankfurt. After the Franco -Prussian War in I87O, Alsace and Lor- 
raine were taken from France. 

After the defeat of Napoleon, all of the German states, including Austria and 
Prussia, formed a loose German Confederation, which had about as little meaning as 
The Holy Roman Empire in its last stage. This confederation was destroyed in I866, 
when most of the members sided with Austria in its fight with Prussia over Schleswig 
and Holstein. It was succeeded by a North German Confederation, con^osed of Prus- 
sia and the remaining northern states which had not been annexed by Prussia. The 
southern German states, excluding Austria, remained in a customs' union with the 
members of the North German Confederation, and most of them made secret military 
alliances with Prussia. These arrangements were soon superceded by the formation 
of the German Empire in I87I, dominated by Prussia, following the short Franco- 
Prussian War. There had long been a nationalistic fervor among the German people, 
but the struggle between Prussia and Austria for dominance and Prussia's insistence 
on dictating the tenris of union, had delayed unification. The heart-warmirig exper- 
ience for all Germans, when Prussia evened the score with France in behalf of all 
Germany, was all that was needed to obtain agreement of the member states to unite 
on Prussian terms. '«i/hile the various steps in the last half of the 19th century, 
leading to German unification, occured during the long reign of King William of 
Prussia, the first to become the German Emperor, the person almost wholly respons- 
ible was his Chancellor (prime minister). Otto von Bismarck, who served from 1862 
to 1890. Bismarck acted with a combination of determination, wisdom, restraint, 
boldness, and unscrupulousness, with a fine sense for timing, to achieve his goal. 

It was Bismarck's policy to cultivate friendship with Russia. Accordingly, he 
renounced all ambitions in Eastern Europe, including the Balkans, and maintained a 
military alliance with Russia. Unfortunately for Germany, the Emperor William II, 
grandson of William I, did not follow the advice of his grandfather and Bismarck to 
continue that policy, but chose in I89O not to renew the Russian alliance, deeming 
it to be incompatible with treaty obligations to Austria -Hungary, whose interest 
was opposed to the growing extension of Russian influence in the Balkans. (This is 
not the place to describe continuing conflicts in the Balkans during the l6th, 19th, 
and early 20th century, involving Russia, Turkey, Great Britain, Austria-Hungary, 
Italy, and the small Balkan nations who became independent of Turkey. But Kaiser 
V'illiam II was right in principle; he had to choose between Russia and Austria- 
Hungary.) Thereafter, Russia entered into a fateful military alliance with France. 
Some tiitte later, William II aggravated relations with Russia by becoming friendly 
with Turkey, in order to aid German commerce. Germany and Austria-Hungary, finding 
themselves without friends and almost surrounded by enemies, made a military alli- 
ance. Later, Italy entered this alliance, because it also opposed Russian aggress- 
ion in the Balkans. When World War I came, Italy refused to honor this commitment 
and entered the war on the other side, thinking it might profit more. 

Prussia's, and later, Germany's military strength was based upon a large 
standing army with universal military service, a professional officer-class of 
great skill and dedication, and a strong well-trained re serve -force, all founded 
upon the general conviction that Germaror lived in the midst of mortal enemies, 
among whom the law of the jungle persisted. In the light of German experience, 

83 



especially with France, this is understandable. This strength vas made possible 
only with a strong central goveniment, strict econony in government, and eventually 
by the growth in industrial power. Germany's military strength was always land- 
bound. 'When it belatedly set out to build a strong navy, it could not outstrip 
Great Britain, which enlarged its navy to keep ahead. In time this led to the ne- 
cessity for Germany to rely on submarines for sea -power. Yet, until the rise of 
Hitler after World War I, Germany unquestionably had only defensive motives in 
maintaining a large military machine. 

Industrial and commercial progress was belatedly speeded up in Prussia, com- 
mencing in the mid-19th century. After unification, Germany's progress was even 
faster, and it was not long before Germany was the greatest industrial nation in 
Europe, and was challenging Great Britain for world markets for its products. This 
was the reason why Germany imitated England, France, the Netherlands, and Belgium, 
in a belated gathering of foreign possessions in Africa and the Pacific (possess- 
ions which were lost in World War I). But connpetition for world trade also injured 
relations with Great Britain, and this, combined with naval conqjetition, resulted 
in Great Britain Joining the military alliance of France and Russia against Germany. 

During the entire 19th century, the growth of a nationalistic spirit was ac- 
companied by a desire for democracy and freedom among the German people, including 
the thinkers, students, and even the common people - - ideas that were becoming 
common in all of Western civilization following the American and French revolutions. 
However, the princes and the landed nobility kept a firm control of the governments 
of the various states and generally opposed liberal political and social ideas as 
long as they could. The Austrian and Prussian governments were more reactionary 
than the southern state governments, but at least, the Prussian kings were more 
progressive in philosophy than their landed nobles. The German people did not re- 
volt violently, as the French did more than once, probably because they had a more 
patient teaqjerament, believed in law and order, and were not as badly oppressed as 
the French were in the l8th century. This resulted generally in slower political 
and social progress in Germany than in France. 

The principal political reform in each state was the creation of a legislative 
assembly elected by the people, with powers limited in vaiying degree. Serfdom 
(bondage) was eliminated in the mid-19th century, and the peasants were permitted 
to own land. Also the lines between the social classes were made more flexible, 
although the nobility was preserved and they were permitted to continue to own en- 
tailed estates (not subject to sale) until after World War I. 

In the year 18U8, there occured a relativ&|jr peaceful revolution that had a 
great inpact eventually, although it was unfruitful at the time. Representatives 
elected by the people in all of the German states met in Frankfurt, framed a pro- 
posed liberal constitution for a united Germany under a limited monarchy, and of- 
fered the crown to the King of Prussia. He refused the offer, because he was not 
yet ready to accept a democratic form of government, as well as because the whole ! 
proposal was opposed by the princes of the other states. In some of the states, ■ 
participants in this movement were jailed; in a few states there were feeble attempts ii 
at armed revolution which were quickly and easily suppressed. 

Industrial and conmercial growth brought into existence a new class of capital- I 
istic barons and large increases in the working and middle classes in the cities. • 
Working-class conditions created new tensions and conflicts. Karl Marx, a German \ 

8k 



i. 



in exile in London, formulated the philosoptgr of Socialism, based upon conditions 
in industrial Germar^r in the mid-19th century. These ideas, without revolution, 
formed the basis for the creation of a socialist political party in Germary that 
obtained considerable strength in the legislative assemblies of the flipire and 
most of the German states, Bismarck felt con^lled to support some of their ad- 
vocated reforms, and hence, in the l880's Germany adopted several measures for the 
benefit of labor, including health insurance and old-age pensions - - measures 
which were not considered seriously in the United States for decades. This great 
speed in making social reforms contrasts strangely with the long delay in making 
social and land reforms in the agricultural area. 

Hundreds of thousands of Germans emigrated to the United States in the 19th 
century. Catholics as well as Protestants, from the cities as well as the farms, 
and from all parts of Germany. While the major reason was pursuit of greater eco- 
nomic opporturiity, there was also the desire for greater political freedom (prior 
to 1871), and in some cases, the desire to escape compulsory military service. 
There were many who left Germany after the unsuccessful revolution of iSiiS. No 
longer was there a reason for escape from the results of destructive wars. Germany 
had relative peace in the 19th century after the Napoleonic period j its short wars 
with Denmark and France were not fought on German soil. 

Entering the 20th century, Germany had made great progress in everything. In 
contrast, Austria-Hungary and Russia were governed by anperors who were doing their 
best to keep their countries' institutions the same as in the l8th century. However, 
in Kaiser William II, Germany also had a doubtful quantity. He was egotistical, 
flamboyant, short-ten^iered , and fond of military display; he intended to be every 
inch an enper^r and not to trust affairs to a well-chosen Chancellor, like his 
grandfather did. Unfortunately, he never had a good, strong Chancellor. Germany, 
like every major nation in Europe, was burdened heavily by a large military estab- 
lishment. Preparedness was supposed to be the best insurance against war. 

The long period of peace in Germany was broken in 1911i with the outbreak of 
World War I. This was a senseless, ferocious, long war that brought catastrophe 
to Europe and terrible consequences for the whole world; the full extent of the 
consequences is still unknown. Austria-Hungary technically started the war by 
attenuating to punish Serbia for trying to incite revolution by Serbs in Austria - 
Hungary, including its involvement in the assassination of its crown-prince. But 
it was Russia, urged on by France, who needlessly made it a general war. (After 
the war, Russian participation in inciting Serbians in Austria -Hungary to revolt 
was disclosed.) Kaiser William's attitude was simply, "If Russia and France want 
to start a general war, Germany is willing and able to finish it". He did not 
feel like asking Austria -Hungary to back down. The system of alliances came into 
play automatically, when Russia invaded East Prussia and Austria -Hungary. Once 
started, the war was in^xsssible to stop short of total defeat for one side or the 
other. Ultimately the Germans were defeated primarily at sea, when they were de- 
prived of in^rts of raw materials and food by the British blockade, and by partial 
failure of Germain's attempted counter-blockade by submarine warfare. The United 
States foolishly entered the war as a result of the submarine blockade, when its 
neutral rights under international law were violated more than by reason of Great 
Britain's sea-blockade. The United States was also influenced by allied propaganda; 
its moral sensibilites were much keener then than now, since our armed forces adopt- 
ed German methods of total war in World War II, including submarine warfare and the 
destruction of industrial cities by bombing from the air. Its attitude should have 

85 



been, "A curse on both your houses". The United States provided the balance of 
power that defeated Gennany on land; it was bi?ought to bear at the time when the 
Russians and Italians were defeated and the French troops were rebellious, after a 
long and valiant defense on French soil, with the ijuportant help of the British. 
If the United States had not entered the war, the allies would have been defeated. 
Later, by hindsight, considering the results, the opinion of tne United States Con- 
gress was that it would have been preferable not to have entered World A'ar I (wit- 
ness the Neutrality Acts of 1935/7 designed to prevent a recurrence, passed after 
hitler became Germany's dictator and it was evident that World War II was coming). 

After victory, the Allies inflicted harsh, vindictive sentences on Germany, 
Austria-Hungary, and their allies. However, a similar satisfaction would probably 
have been levied by the Germans if they had won. These sentences were set forth 
in so-called "peace treaties", because they were required to be accepted in writing 
by representatives of the vanquished nations, as dictated by the victors. German 
acceptance was forced by an allied threat to resume the war if they did not accept, 
and by continuance of the sea-blockade until acceptance. The allies continued the 
sea-blockade, starving the Geririan people, for eight months after the armistice, all 
the while they argued among themselves over the terms of the peace sentences, and 
until the "treaties" were signed by the German representatives. The United States 
Senate rejected the Versailles Treaty with Germany, but later approved a separate 
peace treaty with Germany containing laost of the same provisions. It never approv- 
ed the proposed United States membership in the League of Nations, created to en- 
courage peace among nations by joint action against aggressors, because of reaction 
against involvement in European A'ars. Probably the greatest injustice embodied in 
the Versailles Treaty was the forced acknowledgment, signed by the German represent- 
atives, for the benefit of posterity forever, of the falsehood that Germany and her 
allies were solely responsible for starting the war. 

The German Republic, created after the war, did not last long. It was unable 
to stand the simultaneous strains of new dejx>cratic forces, the economic i^act of 
reparations paymenvs, the economic effect of trade-barriers resulting from the sev- 
erance of other states, the world-wide economic depression of the 1930 's, and the 
insults to national pride in the Versailles Treaty (which weigiied more and more 
heavily as time went by). Although the Allies agreed temporarily to suspension of 
reparations payments, that was not enough. Adolph Hitler, head of the minority 
National Socialist Party (Nazis), became Chancellor of the Republic in 1933, as a 
promised champion and savior of Germany, not without reluctance on the part of many. 
He soon established himself as a dictator, outlawed free-speech, controlled the 
press, and created a police state in which it was a crime to dissent. An unprin- 
cipled, psychotic demagogue, he created enthusiasm among the masses and in the arm- 
ed forces for the better part of his program; the bad part was accepted as an un- 
avoidable part of a package, although there was a minority that approved that also. 

Hitler abrogated the Versailles Treaty, including the per.:^nent suspension of 
reparations payments; undertook rearmament of Germary, as well a& a large public- 
works program; and thus created general prosperity. Germany resumed its position 
as the greatest military power in Europe, as well as its industrial leadership. 
Hitler then proceeded rapidly to achieve his objectives, not simply to redress the 
wrongs in the Versailles Treaty, but to conquer all of Europe in the manner of 
Charlemagne and Napoleon, under the arrogant claim that the Germans are the superi- 
or race and should dominate all lesser races. He played on German sentimentality 
for The Holy Roman En^^ire. He succeeded in uniting Austria with Germany and in 

86 



in taking over the territory of the former kingdom of Bohemia from Czechoslovakia 
without creating a war, probably because some had the feeling that such action was 
not too unreasonable, but certainly in the hope that Gennany would then be satisfied. 
But this was not enough. By agreement with Dictator Stalin of Russia, Hitler in- 
vaded and quickly conquered Poland, while Russia took possession of Eastern Poland 
and the small countries between Poland and Russia. Hitler also made an alliance 
with Italy and Japan, supporting their aims for conquests. France and Great Brit- 
ain challenged the invasion of Poland and prepared for war. Germany soon conquered 
and occupied France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and the Scandinavian countries, but 
was unable to invade England. After Russia seized certain territory in the Balkans 
without prior consultation. Hitler imagined that StalLi was conspiring with Great 
Britain against Germany. Therefore, he turned on Stalin and invaded Russia, where, 
like Napoleon, he met eventual defeat after conquering most of western Russia. 

In the meantime, the United States, under the neutrality acts of 1935/7, at- 
tempted for awhile to remain truly neutral, in order to avoid repetition of its 
mistake in entering World War I. But as the terrible difference in German object- 
ives in World War II soon became apparent to all, the neutrality acts were rescind- 
ed and the United States became more and more unneutral, until it was providing 
huge materiel aid to England and Russia, largely without compensation, and was re- 
arming itself to enter the war against Germany. Immediately after the Japanese 
attacked Pearl Harbor, Germany declared war on the United States. Again, even 
more decisively than in World War I, the United States participation in the con- 
flict this time brought about the complete defeat of Germany and Italy in 19h$, 
while at the same time defeating Japan almost single-handed. 

World War II was much more brutal and uncivilized than World War I, with the 
bombing from the air by both sides of enencr industrial cities, with thousands of 
civilian casualties as well as immense property destruction, including homes and 
historical and art treasures as well as industrial objectives. And the Germans, in 
occupied areas, herded Jews and sometimes other so-called "lesser races" into con- 
centration camps, where they were starved, maltreated, and murdered. The Russians 
and Poles retaliated in kind to some degree. There has been universal condemnation 
of such barbaric treatment of minorities and enemies, but not of bombing cities. 
Peoples of other nations have been ahead of people in the United States in assert- 
ing the inmorality of bombing cities, especially in contenplation of the horrors of 
possible atomic destruction. 

Following the end of World War II, Germaixsr was divided into four parts for oc- 
cupation by the Allied powers, while peace terms were being determined leisurely. 
In 19U8 it was found that Russia iijould not agree to any peace settlement with Ger- 
many, except on her own terms, and more recently it was found to be Russian policy 
to keep Germany divided indefinitely in order to prevent East Germary (its puppet 
state for the area occupied by it) from becoming a part of a strong united Germany, 
which would be most certainly an ally of the Western powers in the Cold War 
that had developed between them and Russia. Hence, it appears that the Federal 
Republic of Germany, on the West, and the German Democratic Republic, on the East, 
will exist apart indefinitely, and that there will be no specific peace settlement, 
since neither side desires to use force to settle the matter. Nevertheless, it is 
still the objective of both East and West Germar^ to be reunited, and this object- 
ive is supported by the United States. Unhappily, the terms of the peace settle- 
ment by the Allies with Austria forbids reunification with Germany, even if it is 
mutually desired. Austria is not only German, but her lack of economic self-suffic- 
iency makes it desirable that she be united with Germany. The ultimate consequences 

87 



of preventing German unification are unknovn. Past experience would suggest that 
it may be unhealthy for Russia, and possibly also for civilization. 

Immediately after the war, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Jugoslavia, and Hungary 
were also restored, except for that part of Poland which Russia annexed. Russia 
supported Poland's claim for all German territory east of the northern Oder and 
Neisse Rivers (including Eastern Pomerania, East Prussia, and Western Silesia, 
which were German states for centuries, even after World War I). Accordingly, the 
Oder-Neisse line became the boundary between Poland and East Germany, and about 
ten million Germans east of the line were moved by Russia and Poland to Gennan ter- 
ritory west of the line - - one of the greatest mass migrations in history. West 
Gennany does not accept the Oder-Neisse line, and the United States is not committed 
to it. The boundary between West Germany and France is about the same as after 
World War I. The German states of Alsace and Lorraine have been a part of France 
since the end of World War I. Although no plebiscites were ever conducted in either 
of those states, it is understood that their inhabitants are now satisfied to be in 
French provinces. 

West Germany comprises about 70^ of the total area of present East and West 
Germany, and contains about 78^ of the total population of approximately 76 mil- 
lions. While both parts of Germany have recovered economically, their combined 
industrial production is now surpassed by Russia. However, the per-capita income 
in West Germany is almost twice that in Russia, although about the same as that 
in Great Britain and France. Life in the truly democratic West Germany is more 
appealing than in the communist, totalitarian East. Consequently, emigration to 
the West is prohibited in the East, in order to avoid the population loss, but this 
has not prevented the escape of thousands. 

r 

The United States contributed greatly to the rehabilitation of West Germany 
(as well as the rest of Viestern Europe) by aid under the Marshall Plan and by sub- 
sequent loans and credits. Such aid greatly exceeded the value of industrial mach- 
inery and equipment taken from West Germany and given to Russia, as reparations, 
immediately after the war. No other reparations payments were demanded. The Unit- 
ed States armed forces, with their nuclear power, also provide a shield for the 
protection of West Germany from Russia. The West German armed forces are an inte- 
gral part of the total NATO forces in Germany. 

West Germany is a member of the European Coal and Steel Community and the Eur- 
opean Economic Community (Common Market), the purposes of which are to eliminate 
all trade barriers between the Western-European member-nations. Originally EEC 
was also planned to be a medium for ultimate political unification of its members 
- - a goal still supported by West Germany, but not by France, whose dictator, 
General Charles de Gaulle, wants to see Europe dominated by France. He dreams of 
past French Grandeur (glory) in the days of Louis XIV and Napoleon. 

The present government of West Germany gives promise that it is learning how 
to function properly as a democracy, and that the leaders of the principal con- 
flicting political parties are learning the true nature of the politicians' art, 
which is to resolve, or at least to compromise, conflicting interests, and to pro- 
tect the basic rights of minorities, without resort to dictatorship or force. This 
lesson has not yet been learned well by any European nation, except Great Britain, 
Switzerland, the Netherlands, the Scandinavian countries, and possibly Belgiiun and 
Finland. 



\ 



88 



1 






RESEARCH METHODS AND SOURCES OF DATA 

Soon after beginning this undertaking, it was decided to attenpt to list in 
this work the names, parentage, and other pertinent genealogical facts concerning 
all descendants of Balser Bortner, living and dead, who carry or carried the name 
"Bordner", and all of their preceding Bortner ancestors in America. The same prin- 
ciple was later extended to the related descendants of Balser Bortner who carry or 
carried the name "Burtner". It was decided that no effort would be made to trace 
the descendants of Bordner and Burtner daughters, whose names, of course, are dif- 
ferent, because the effort involved would be staggering in magnitude and no high- 
degree of completeness of results of such an effort could be expected. The high- 
degree of achievement of the goal set has been pleasantly surprising. 

The development of the genealogical data for the Bordner and Burtner families 
was a process which combined search of published records with solicitation of data 
from living Bordners and Burtners all over the United States. 

The Library of Congress was consulted first; it has a large genealogical sec- 
tion, and it has the most comprehensive collection of published books and magazines 
of any library in the United States. Especially valuable in this research were the 
following: the genealogy, "George Bortner of Codorus Township, York County, Penn- 
sylvania, and his descendants"; "Pennsylvania German Pioneers", by Strassburger and 
Hinke; Archives of the Colony and the Coiunonwealth of Pennsylvania; various county 
histories which contain genealot^ical data, especially for Berks and Northujnberland 
Counties in Pennsylvania; the voluir.es of William H. Egle, "Notes and Queries, His- 
torical and Genealogical, Relating to Pennsylvania"; certair; of the few available 
eariy-Pennsj'lvania church and ministerial records on file there; and a few publish- 
ed genealogies for other families which contained data concerning merchers of those 
families who had intermarried with Bordners or Eurtners. 

The Pennsylvania Archives contain data from records of colonial military forc- 
es, including the Pennsylvania militia during the xievolutionary V/ar; tax lists by 
county and township for the latter part of the l8th century; records of Warrants 
issued by the Colonial Proprietors (the Penns) for the purchase of land; and rec- 
ords of foreigners who were naturalized as British citizens prior to the Revolu- 
tionary Vfer. These records were searched for all Eortners, Bordners, and Burtners, 
with the assistance of their complete indexes. 

Translations of a nunber of old records from German cities and districts, 
listing er.iigrants fron: the Rhineland to America in the l6th century, were founc in 
the Library of Congress, but no listing was found for Balser Bortner (which ..ould 
have told us from where he came). Similarly no Bortner coat-of-arip.s was found in 
the comprehensive collection of German coats-of-arms, although inforniaticn was 
found on the Pfortner family, possibly related in name, as previously stated. 

Books and magazines in the Library of Congress also provided most of the re- 
sources for research on the historical background of Colonial Perjisylvania , the 
Pennsylvania Dutch, and the German homeland. 

Kany records in the National Archives were also examined; these provided ex- 
tensive valuable information. Most important were the decennial census records of 
the United States from 1790 to 1880 (the last available to the public); these were 
searched laboriously for every county and township (or city) m which Bordners and 

89 



Burtners and their Bortner ancestors viere located at the time, or suspected of be- 
ing located. Census schedules, coinmencing in 18$0, list each person in each family 
by name and age, but census schedules prior thereto only list the heads of house- 
holds and ennuraerate the males and females in each household by age group. U. S. 
military and pension records, available for all wars up to 1900, also provided much 
data on war veterans, their families, where they lived, etc. U. S. land records 
for Ohio were not helpful, because they disclosed no sales of public lands to Bord- 
ners or Burtners. 

The library of the Historical Society of Berks County, Pennsylvania, in Read- 
ing, furnished valuable copies of records of fleformed and Lutheran churches in that 
county (baptisms and marriages). The Fackenthal library of Franklin and Marshall 
College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, provided similar early records of Reformed church- 
es in other counties of southeastern Pennsylvania. Some similar records for Luther- 
an churches in southeastern Pennsylvania are maintained in a Lutheran Seminary in 
Philadelphia, but were not available for inspection. 

The Pennsylvania State Library in Harrisburg contains a great deal of pertin- 
ent genealogical data, but most of it had already been examined in other places. 
However, information was found there from tombstones and church records from Cum- 
berland County (the Zeamer Collection). Similarly, very little additional data was 
found in the library of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. 

The Pennsylvania Colonial records of land sales, maintained in the Bureau of 
Land Records, Department of Internal Affairs, in the Capitol Building in Harrisburg, 
provided much more information on land sales than was found in the published Arch- 
ives of the Colony. 

County public records were consulted in the court-houses of mar^ counties in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, northeastern Indiana, and southern Michigan - - records of mar- 
riages. Wills, estates, and such birth and death records as were available. Copies 
of deeds and divorce-case records were examined in some instances. 

Examination of the lineage records of the members of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution provided limited but useful data concerning the ancestry of a 
few Bordners . 

Tombstones and grave-markers in church and public cemeteries were searched for 
in some places, mainly as a last resort, because that is verj' time-consuming - - 
and then principally in those areas which were visited for examination of county 
records. In such instances, to the extent possible, cemetery records were examined 
to eli m i n ate the excessive time involved in systenatically cruising through entire 
cemeteries. In the case of York County, Pennsylvania, tombstone inscriptions from 
nest of the county's cemeteries, up to about 1935, were found in the library of the 
county historical society. 

Telephone directories were searched for names and addresses of Bordners and 
Burtners listed, not only for the areas visited in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and 
Michigan, but also for all the major cities of the United States, in the library of 
telephone directories maintained by the telephone company in Washington, D. C, and 
for many smaller communities in which Bordners and Burtners were known to have been 
once located (which directories were procured by special order through the Washing- 
ton telephone couqjany). All such Bordners and Burtners were circularized, request- 
ing data for their families, and generally also for their fathers' families. In 

90 



those letters, a promise was made to give each person who furnished data, an out- 
line of his or her Bordner or Burtner lineage back to our mutual immigrant ancest- 
or. Despite such promised compensation, first returns were disappointing; many- 
did not reply. Follow-up letters were sent to those who did not reply, and in the 
areas later visited, personal calls and local phone-calls were made to obtain miss- 
ing data. In a few localities, similar visits and phone calls were made by relat- 
ives in those areas. In a number of instances, as a last resort, long-distance 
phone-calls were made. Data obtained by all of these means provided additional 
names and addresses of other living Bordners and Burtners to write for information. 
Without such assistance, which is gratefully acknowledged, this work could not have 
been couple ted. In the end, very few adamantly refused to provide information. 

There were difficulties in trying to connect the data provided through circu- 
larization of the living with data obtained from other sources - - in soiae instanc- 
es, the last-available data from other sources being that provided in the I88O U.S. 
census schedules. Public recoi?ds were useful in bridging the gap. For localities 
not personally visited, the county recorders and other appropriate local officials 
were written, with requests for specific information, but to the greatest possible 
extent, correspondence with descendants was used as the preferred means of obtain- 
ing connecting data. In some instances, correspondents kindly provided comprehens- 
ive data from family bibles, results of research by themselves or relatives for 
their respective branches of the family, or names and addresses of others who were 
able to provide such data; such assistance was especially helpful. Below are list- 
ed, with grateful appreciation, the names of those who provided exceptional assist- 
ance: 

William T. Bordner and son, Raymond C, ifyerstown. Pa. - Family of Thomas L. Bord- 
ner of Bethel, Pa. and descendants; also families of his ancestors in Bethel. 

John D. Bordner, Hummelstown, Pa,; Hairvey Bohn, Lickdale, Pa.; Gerald Boltz, Leb- 
anon, Pa, - Families of many Lebanon County Bordners and their lineage. 

Robert Bordner, Peninsula, Ohio - Families of Godfrey Bordner of Berks County, Pa. 
and John Bordner of Dauphin and Lebanon Counties, Pa,, and of some of their 
descendants, including family of John H. Bordner of Zamboanga, Philippine Is- 
lands and his descendants. 

Miss Gertrude L. Bordner, Saltsburg, Pa, - Family of Godfrey Bordner Jr, of Berks 
and Lebanon Counties, Pa. and his descendants, 

Gerald H. Bordner, Paxtang, Pa,; C. E, Koppenheffer, finporium. Pa.; William H. 
Bordner, Williams town. Pa.; and Jacob J. Bordner, Jolliett, Pa. - Many families 
of Bordners in Dauphin Co., Pa, 

Mrs, Esther Janing, Geneva, Nebr, and John F. Bordner, Northumberland, Pa, - Data 
for many families of Northumberland County Bordners (and Mrs, Janing for fami- 
lies of their Nebraska descendants). 

Mrs. Gladys L. Simler, Cincinnati, Ohio - Data on first Bordner families in Ohio 
and family of Peter Bordner, the first of Daiqshin County, Pa. 

Miss Florence N. Bordner, North Canton, Ohio - Families of descendants of John P. 
Bordner and other Bordner families in Stark County and Tuscarawas County, Ohio. 

Daniel E. Bordner, New Washington, Ohio - families of Jacob Bordner of Crawford 
County, Ohio and some of his descendants, 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Magill, Holgate, Ohio - Data on various Bordners in Henry County, 
Ohio. 

Mark H. Bordner, Wayne E, Bordner, Roy Bordner, and Mrs, Oscar (Clara) Bordner of 
Montpelier, Ohio, and McClellan N, Bordner of Metamora, Ohio - Various families 
of Bordners in Williams County, Ohio and their descendants. 

91 



William C. Bordner, San Francisco, Calif. - Descendants of Jonathan Bordner of 
De Kalb County, Ind. 

Mrs. John S. Bordner, Madison, Wise. - Families of Isaac Bordner and John Bordner 
of Elkhart County, Ind. and their descendants. 

Mrs. Edna Albright, Jackson, Mich. - Families of Levi Bordner of Elkhart County, 
Ind. and his son, Samuel Bordner of Plymouth, Ind. 

Martin Love, Lewistown, HI. - Families of Peter Bordner of Lewistowi, 111. and 
his descendants. 

Mrs. Blanche Jones, Stephenville, Tex. - Families of Texas descendants of Peter 
Bordner of Lewistown, 111. 

Mrs. Margaret Beemer, Bedford, Iowa - Families of Iowa descendants of Peter 
Bordner of Lewistown, 111. 

Terrance J. Bordner and Lawrence M. Bordner Jr., Freeport, 111.; Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam G. Bordner, Dakota, 111.; Charles L. Bordner Jr., Clinton, Wise. - Famil- 
ies of Jacob and George Bordner of Stephenson County, 111. and descendants. 

tfrs. Alice Brummel, Long Beach, Calif, and Mrs. Helen McLaughlin, Highmore, S. D. 
- Families of Daniel M. Bordner of Stephenson County, 111. and descendants. 

James 0. Bordner, Sweeny, Tex. - Family of George I. Bordner of Kansas and his 
descendants; also various other Bordner families in Kansas. 

Dewey M. Brown and Mrs. Helen Shaw, Holton, Kans. - Families of Benjamin F. 
Bordner of Circleville, Kans. and his descendants. 

Gqy Bordner, Long Beach, Calif. - Families of William S. Bordner of Nebraska and 
California and his descendants; also other Bordner families in California. 

Clare S. Burtner, Butler, Pa. - Families of Philip and John Bortner (Burtner) of 
Allegheny and Butler Counties, Pa. and their descendants. 

Evers Burtner, Wakefield, Mass. - Families of Samuel Burtner of Cumberland County, 
Pa. and his descendants. 

Mrs. Eunice March, Shawnee Mission, Kans. - Families of Reuben Burtner of Kansas 
and his descendants. 

Miss Emna B. Burtner, Keedysville, Md. - Families of P^v. Henry Burtner of Dayton, 
Va. and his son, Ezra Burtner of Washington County, Md. and descendants. 

Mr. and Mrs. William 0. Burtner, Arlington and Harrisonburg, Va., and Roy H. Burt- 
ner Jr., Washington, D. C. - Families of descendants of Rev. Henry Burtner . 

Mrs. Naomi Burtner Mulcahy, East Gary, Ind. - Genealogy for George Otterbein Burt- 
ner of Coles County, HI. and his descendants (copy provided by courtesy of 
Clare S. Burtner, Butler, Pa.). 

Mrs. Henrietta J. Jefferis, Indianapolis, Ind. - Mailing list of association of 
descendants of George Otterbein Burtner. 

Ifrs. Nona Forgason, Wharton, Tex., and her daughter, Mrs. Johny Jean Clark, Pasa- 
dena, Tex. - Families of Jacob L. Burtner of Douglas County, 111. and certain 
descendants . 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C. Burtner, Oakland, 111. - Families of Thomas J. Burtner 
of Douglas County, 111. and Miles City, Mont, and certain descendants. 

Mr. and Mrs. Orville L. Burtner, Kansas City, Kans. - Families of Charles J. Burt- 
ner of Kansas City, Kans. and descendants. 

C. Walton Burtner, San Jose, Calif., and Mrs. Mildred Martin, Saratoga, Calif. - 
Families of Rev. John Burtner of Edgar County, 111. and certain descendants. 

Mrs. Hilda E. Bordner, Hershey, Pa. - Special acknowledgment for providing a print 
of the Bortner coat-of-arms originally distributed by The Bortner Association 
of York County, Pennsylvania. 



92 



EXPIANATICTJ OF REGISTERS OF NAMES AMD THEIR USE 

The principal genealogical registers which follow are the registers of males 
and their families. These are subdivided into three parts: Part B for all known 
Bordner males, both living and dead, who are descended from Balser Bortner; Part C 
for all known Burtner males who are descended from Balser Bortner; and Part A, for 
Balser Bortner and all of his male descendants named "Bortner" who are also ancest- 
ors of either Bordner or Burtner males who are listed in Parts B and C. No other 
Bortner males are listed; those not listed are all descendants of CSeorge Bortner 
of Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania, for whom The Bortner Association 
published a genealogy in 19U9. 

In the registers of males and their families, males are listed in alphabetical 
order of given names; those who have the same given name are listed in order of 
birthdates. For each male the following facts are given, to the extent known: 

Number of generation (counting Balser Bortner as the first generation, his sons 

as the second generation; their sons as the third generation, etc.) 
Name of father and maiden name of mother 
Maiden name of each wife 

Years of birth and death of husband and wife (or wives) 
Where the family live (or lived) 
His occupation 

Military service in time of war 
Given names of children for each marriage 
In the case of daughters, the family names of their husbands 

For dates of birth of children and other information regarding them, one should re- 
fer to their individual listings in the registers. For exanqjle, all male children, 
including infants, are listed individually in the male registers, as well as adult 
males. 

Females are listed in two separate registers: Part D for Bordners, and Part E 
for Burtners. Each known female is listed, including unmarried women and children. 
The listing is also, first in alphabetical order of given name, and second, for 
those having the same given name, in order of birthdates. Information is similar 
to that given for each male up to the time of marriage, when they changed their 
nanKS. To the extent known, each of their husbands is named, and if living, their 
locations are given; if deceased, the last known place of residence is stated. Their 
childrens' names are not given, nor are they listed in the registers of males and 
females, except for the few offspring who carry the Bordner or Burtner name, rather 
than their fathers' names (cases of resuji?)tion of maiden name by mother after di- 
vorce, and cases of children bom out of wedlock). For those who are deceased, the 
years of death are not given; generally those dates were not ascertained. 

The data in these registers were conpiled over a period of about five years 
in the case of Bordners, and two years in the case of Burtners. Changes in data 
initially obtained, to make the data more current, were recorded only when the in- 
formation was subsequently reported. Hence, the data will be slightly out-of-date 
in many cases at the time of publication of this genealogy; and in some cases, the 
data will be a little more current than in other cases. 



93 



One may trace his Bordner-Bortner lineage, or Burtner-Bortner lineage, back 
to our mutual immigrant ancestor, Balser Bortner, primarily by use of the regist- 
ers of males and their families. This may be done by going backwards in a step- 
by-step reference to the father of each one in the chain. When one reaches the 
ancestor who first -was known by the Bordner or Burtner name, he must then trace 
that ancestor's father, grandfather, etc. back through the register of Bortner 
males (Part A). One's lineage will have as many steps as the number of his own 
generation. An example follows, using as the starting point, Thomas L. Bordner 
of Bethel Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania; he was the grandfather of many 
living Bordners: 

First, look up Thomas L. Bordner in Part B of the registers. It is shown 
there that he was of the 5th generation, and that his parents were Jacob Bordner 
and Catharine Lerch. Second, look up, in Part B of the registers, Jacob Bordner 
of the Uth generation who married Catharine Lerch. There we note, that he did 
have a son, Thomas L., and hence we can be sure that we are on the right track. 
Then note that his father, in turn, was also named Jacob Bordner and his mother's 
maiden name was Anna Maria Brosz. Third, look up in Part B of the registers, 
Jacob Bordner of the third generation who married Anna Maria Brosz. There we note 
that they did have a son, Jacob. Then note that his father, in turn, was also 
named Jacob Bordner and his mother's maiden name was Sarah Bait. Fourth, look up 
in Part B of the registers , Jacob Bordner of the 2nd generation who married Sarah 
Bait. There we note that they had a son named Jacob. Then we also note that his 
father, in turn, was Balser Bortner, and that Jacob was the first in his line to 
adopt the name "Bordner". For the fifth and last step, look up Balser Bortner, 
this time in Part A of the registers, because his name was Bortner. Then we may 
list the Bortner-Bordner lineage of Thomas L. Bordner from the beginning, thus: 

1. Balser Bortner (cl698 - 17U7/8) - m. Maria Elisabetha (cl695 - cl750) 

2. Jacob Bortner (Bordner) (cl720 - 1792) - m. Sarah Bait"! ? - ? ) 

3. Jacob Bordner (175U - 1837) - m. Anna Maria Brosz (l76l - I839) 
I. Jacob Bordner (1793 - I867) - m. Catharine Lerch (1793 - I868) 

5. Thomas L. Bordner (I82I; - 1899) - m. Melinda Schneider (I83O - 1915) 

And this may be brought right on down to the person who undertook to find his line- 
age in this example. 

At each step in looking up one's ancestors, generation by generation, one may 
find further information concerning them and their respective families; then one 
may also continue to find data for uncles, aunts, and cousins in the registers. 

For the additional assistance of many in finding information in the registers, 
an index is provided of the names of those men and women from other families who 
married Bordners, Burtners, and their Bortner ancestors. The index is alphabetical 
- - first by family name, and second by given name. In each case, there is given 
the name of the Bortner, Bordner, or Burtner who she or he married; and with that 
name, one may find further information in the appropriate register. 

Despite extreme care and patience in research and in compiling this work, er- 
rors may be found in the registers, primarily in spelling names, omitting persons 
not discovered, and omitting names of undisclosed husbands and wives. To the ex- 
tent any error was avoidable, an apology is made. However, it is believed that 
most errors are attributable to failure of informants to disclose coii5)lete and ac- 
curate information. 

9h 



_i 



REGISTER OF MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

PART A - BORTNER ANCESTORS 

Number preceding name indicates generation, counting Balser Bortner as first genera- 
tion, his children as second generation, their children as third generation, etc. 

Refer to Part B for Bordner males and Part C for Burtner males (and their families). 

1. Balser (Balthaser) Bortner (cl698-17U7/8) - m. Maria Elisabetha (cl695-cl750) 

Farmer in the Tulpehocken Settlement in Lancaster Co., Pa. (part in Western part of 
Berks Co. after 1752). Arrived in Philadelphia in September, 1732 on Ship, "Adven- 
ture", from Rotterdam, Holland. Came from one of German States in the Rhine River 
Valley, probably the Palatinate. Common ancestors of almost all of the Bortners, 
Bordners, and Burtners in the United States. Children: Born in the Old Country: 
Jacob (Bordner), Anna Maria Barbara (Mrs. Henry Kann), and perhaps, George (although 
he might have been born in the Tulpehocken Settlement). Born in the Pennsylvania 
Colony: Peter, Philip Jacob, Phillipina (Mrs. Charles Shaffer, Mrs. Frederick 
Frasher), (Maria) Elisabetha (Betsey - Mrs. Michael Lau or Low). 

2. George (cl732 - cl80l) - m. Maria Appalonia Floucher ( ? - ? ) 

Son of Balser and Maria Elisabetha Bortner. Possibly born in the Old Country; 
possibly in the Pennsylvania Colony. Raised in the Tulpehocken Settlement in Lan- 
caster Co., Pa. (part in Western part of Berks Co. after 1752). Farmer in Codorus 
Tvp., York Co., Pa. after 1759. In Pennsylvania militia during the Revolutionary 
War. Children: Julia, Christina (Mrs. Abraham Hassler), George Jr., Ludwig, Cath- 
arine, Elizabeth, Philip, John, Peter, Margaret, Jacob, and Michael. Only John and 
Peter had any descendants named "Bordner" or "Burtner". All descendants of other 
sons who bore family name were named "Bortner". * 

3. Jacob (cl755 - I8l5) - m. (l) Susanna (Meyer ?)(cl755 - cl780); (2) Eva 

(cl760 - cl820). Probably son of Peter Bortner. Farmer in Warwick Twp., Lancaster 
Co., Pa. until at least 1782, and later in East Pennsborough Twp. (part now in 
Silver Spring Twp.), Cumberland Co., Pa. In Pennsylvania militia during Revolution- 
ary War. Children:(l) George (Burtner), Jacob (Bordner); (2) Samuel (Burtner). Also 

two daughters: Elizabeth (Mrs. Philip Bretz), Barbara (Mrs. Walter Linn) which 

marriage is unknown. 

li. Jacob (1795 - ? ) - m. (l) Susanna Schneider (?); (2) Name unknown; (3) Ann Hess. 
Son of John Bortner and Juliana Gantz. Farmer in Hopewell Twp., York Co., Pa. 
Children: Josiah, Jacob Schneider, John (probably all in first marriage); perhaps 
others, names unknown. Only John changed his name ("Bordner"). All descendants of 
other sons who bore family name were named "Bortner". * 

3. John (1768 - 1859) - m. Juliana Gantz (cl756 - l82h) 

Son of George Bortner and Maria Appalonia Floucher. Born in Codorus Twp., York Co., 
Pa. Farmer in Hopewell Twp., York Co., Pa. Children: Jane (Mrs. Robert Hyson), 

John, Elizabeth (Mrs. John Fife), Jacob, Salome (Mrs. Yost), Peter, Jesse. 

Only Jacob had any descendants named "Bordner". All descendants of other sons who 
bore family name were named "Bortner". * 



* See footnote on following page. 

9$ 



REGISTER OF MALES AM) THEIR FAMILIES 
PART A - BORTNER ANCESTORS (CONTINUED) 

2. Peter (cl73U - ? ) - m. Name unknown 

Son of Balser Bortner and Maria Elisabetha Bortner. Farmer in Heidelberg Twp., 
Lancaster Co., Pa. until at least I76O. Probably died young, Probable son, Jacob. 

3. Peter (1770 - I832) - m. Elizabeth Wayne (177U - 1855) 

Son of George Bortner and Maria Appalonia Floucher. Farmer in Codorus Twp., York- 
Co., Pa. until at least I8OI, when he moved to Franklin Twp., Yoi-k Co. Children: 
George, Peter Jr., Christina, Catharine, John, Martin, William, Elizabeth (Betsey). 
Children generally known as "Eurtner", although not all of them actually changed 
their name. (See Part C.) * 

2. Philip Jacob (cl735 - 1786) - m, Elizabeth (Maria Elisabetha) Velt (17U1 - cl800) 
Son of Balser and Maria Elisabetha Bortner. Farmer in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
until about 1779 when he moved with his family to Pine Grove Twp., Berks Coo (now 
in Schuylkill COo). In Pennsylvania militia during Revolutionary War. Surviving 
children: Henry (Bordner), George (Bordner), John (Burtner), Philip (Burtner), 
Elizabeth, Hannah (Mrs. Adam Bingeman ?), Juliana, Balser (Balthaser - Bordner), 
Magdalena (Mrs. Adam Kembel ?), and Christina (Mrs. John Neis or Ney ?). 



*Most of the data for this family from. "George Bortner of Codorus Township, York 
County, Pennsylvania, and his descendants", prepared by Charles H. Glatfelter, 
and published by The Bortner Association, Glen Rock, Pa. (19U9). Reference is 
made to that work for data on all of his other descendants named "Bortner". 



Note: Not all males who were generally known as "Bordner " or "Burtner", as indi- 
cated above, actually so changed their names, but their sons or grandsons made 
the change. Nevertheless, they and their families are listed in Parts B and C, 
respectively, for convenience. The true facts, so far as ascertainable, with 
respect to such name changes, are stated for each male and his family. 



96 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AN D THEIR FAMILIES 

Number preceding name indicates generation, counting Balser Bortner as first genera- 
tion, his children as second generation, their children as third generation, etc. 



$. Aaron (l8U0 - 1922) - m. Mary Uraholtz (l8ii2 - 1919) 

Son of John P. and Sarah Bordner. Farmer in Pike Twp., Stark Co. and Sandy Twp., 
Tuscarawas Co., Ohio. Children: Lillian (Lilly), Laura V. (Collins), Edith, 
Arminta (Beadle ) . 

5. Aaron (1862 - 1927) - m. Amanda Clark (cl863 - 1939) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Kocher. Farm laborer and fireman (railroad and stationary 
boilers), Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co. and Montpelier, Ohio; Denison, Tex., 
Detroit, Mich. Children: Lloyd Wilce, Orval J. 

5. Abe (Abram) A. (1885 - m. Mae Blake (cl885 - 

Son of Jesse and Mary A. Burk. Truck driver, construction worker, operator of 
coal mine, and presently church custodian. Living in Akron, Ohio; also lived in 
Defiance and Canton, Ohio and in California. No children. 

6. Abner (1869 - 1927) - m. Mary Jane Seniff (I876 - 

Son of Daniel and Elizabeth Wilson. Farmer in De Witt Co,, 111., Iowa, Oregon, 
and Calif. Children: Gertrude Aileen (Thompson). Widow lives in Long Beach, Cal. 

6. Abram John (I87O - 1953) - m. (1) Charlotte Boyee (cl870 - ? ); (2) Survilla 
Osborn (I87O - 19U5); (3) Annabelle Mocherman (Kohlenberger-Calvin) (I88O - 
Son of Henry and Louisa A. Smith, originally named "John Abram". Farmer and 
gravel-pit operator, Flatrock Twp., Henry Co. and near Montpelier, Ohio. 
Children: (l) Lala (Zachrich); (2) Mark Henry; Ruth (Kuranick); (3) None. 
Widow married Jesse V. Bordner and lives in Montpelier, Ohio. 

8. Adam Cyrus (1905 - m. Esther C. Potteiger (1906 - 

Son of (Milton) Miles and Dora A. Kline. School teacher. Born in Bethel Twp., 
now lives in West Lawn, Berks Co., Pa, Children: Carlen Itobert, Joyce Dora 
(Snyder), Dawn Carol (Reddy). 

6. Adam F. (1875 - 1956) - m. (l) Louisa Huber (l87h - 1913); (2) Anna Elemina Smith 
(1892 - . Son of Hugh and Elizabeth Gangluff . Owned and operated a jewelry store 
in New Washington, Ohio (Crawford Co.). Children; (1) Carl Hugh, Lucille (Kaiser), 
Helen (Strassburger); (2) None. 

6. Adam H. (l850 - 1911) - m. Valeria R. Schock (l857 - 1938) 

Son of David and Dina Schneider, Farmer in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Children: 
(Milton) Miles, Marie Elsie. 

7. Adam Lesley (cl902 - 19U9) - m, Ruth (cl902 - ? ) 

Son of William G. and Mary J. Lesley. Foreman of power-line crew in Battle Creek, 
Mich. No children. 

7. Addison (1858 - 19U0) - m. Rebecca Shaeffer (I86I - 19U5) 

Son of John and Diana Peifer. Mill worker, farmer, and merchant near Lebanon, Pa, 
Children: Katie (Hernley), Annie, Sarah (Sadie), William Frank, Edith (Sholly - 
Miller), Ellen, Jacob, Cora, Margaret (Freeman), John A., George Henry, Erla 
(Schaeffer). 

97 



PART B - REGISTER O F BORDMER MALES AND TH EIR F AKT LISS 

7. Adrian J. Bordner (1917 - m. Dorothy May Nealon (1926 - 

Son of Oscar F. and Sylvia A. Dugan. Special-delivery postal clerk, Burbank, Cal. 
also lived in Oklahoma and New Mexico. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Arniy(Corp. 
Children: Cindy Susan, Bonnie Louise, Robert Allan. 

6. Albert (18^1 - 1928) m. Margaret A. Kent (18^0 - 1906) 

Son of John and Sarah Shade. Farmer in Florence and Superior Twps., Williams Co. 
Ohio. Children: (William) Earl, Carrie (Calvin). 

6. Albert (I87I - 19U$) - m. Anna Friese (cl870 - ? ) 

Son of Elijah and Susan Hossler. Farmer and fur-buyer, near Attica (Seneca Co.) 
Ohio. No children. 

7. Albert (1877 - 196l) - m. Cora E. Smith (I88I - I96I) 

Son of (Benjamin) Watson and Anna Hess. Machinist in Seneca Falls, N, Y. Child- 
ren: Hazel Eleanor (Flatten - Ulrich), Edna Mae (Noble). li 

■ j 

7. Albert Lawson (l873 - 1939) - ra. Mary Alice Briggs (l875 - 19U8) i 

Son of Daniel M. and Martha Patten. Veterinarian. Born in Dakota Twp. , Stephen- 
son Co., 111., also lived in T/fymore and Lincoln, Nebr. and Narapa, Idaho. Children: 
Ralph Briggs. 

6. Albert Lee (I868 - 1928) - m. Cora Izora Roberts (1882 - 1965) ^ 

Son of Peter and Nancy J. Shortnes. Farmer. Born in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Coc t 

111. , moved to near De Soto, Dallas Co., Tex. Children: Harvey Lee, Ona Gertrud I 

(Sharp), John Hillery. I 

6. Albert M. (I887 - 1910) - Unmarried 

Son of Frederick M. and Matilda Mc Curtain. Laborer in Lower Mahanoy T-wp., North- 
umberland Co., Pa. 



7. Albert Raymond (1932 - m. Edith Grace Mauser (1935 - 

Son of Dorsey A. and Maude A. Lubold. Parmer and machinist. Born in Jordan Twp., 
Northumberland Co., Pa. also lived near Klingerstown, Schuylkill Co.; now lives 
near Pillow, Pa, (Dauphin Co.). Children: Lena Grace. 

6. Albert S. (I868 - 1928) - m. Maude Knight (I872 - 1955) 

Son of John Washington and Sarah E. Stigner. Farmer and tavern-operator in and 
near Ligonier, Ind. (Noble Co.). Children: Faye (Miller), Ruth (Hartman-Zimmer). 

6. Albert William (I878 - ? ) - m. Stella Bradford (cl880 - ? ) 

Son of Daniel and Anna Whitmsr. Born in Lucas Co., Ohio, moved to Oklahoma. No 
children. 

5. Alfred (1837 - 1910) - m. Jane Hasson (iBhh - 1918) 

Son of (George) Peter and Christiana Losh. Farmer. Born in Hopewell Twp., Lick- 
ing Co., Ohio, moved with parents to Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Children: 
Effie D. (Hummel), William Clement, Charles Alfesta, Oscar Elmer, James K., Anna 
Christina, Ada May, (Oliver) Perry, Janetta, Jennie (Murphy), Blanche S. (Bolend- 
er-Sutton). 

98 



■^' 



BVRT B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Alfred (l8UU - 1912) - m. Harriet G. Scrivener (l8U5 - 1919) 

Son of Jonathan and Lucinda Bearce. Fanner in Fulton Co., 111. and Taylor Co., 
Iowa (1881). Veteran of Civil War - Private, Co. D, 132nd 111. Inf. Children: 
Nellie I. (Williams), Emma C. (Sheley), Arria E. (Orme), H. Lucy (Quigley), 
Jonathan (John) F., William Harvey, Harry Homer, Bertha A. (Davidson), Frank 
Lee, Mary A. (Webb - Merchant). 

$. Alfred Lemuel (l85l - 19UU) - m. Mary Barbara Shinew (1853 - 1930) 

Son of Michael and Leah Buchtel. Farmer and merchant in Montgomery Twp., Wood 
Co., Ohio. Children: Edwin Lewis, Harvey Nelson, Floyd West. 

7. J. Allen (1898 - m. (l)Grace Hoy (cl898-cl9liO); (2) Marjorie Bordner (cl898 - 

Son of John W. and Mary C. Bowers. Railroad trainman. Born in Jackson Twp., Dau- 
phin Co., Pa.; now lives in Shamokin Dam, Pa. (Snyder Co.). Children: Audrey (Wise ) , 

7. Allen F. (l892 - 1892) Son of Jerome M. and Mary A. Horstick. Paliryra, Pa. 

8. Allen W. (1899 - 1899) Son of Jonathan P. and Emma Merkey. Hummelstown, Pa, 

6. Alpha Truly (1883 - 1955) - m. Flora Haefer (1882 - 1963) 

Son of Levi and Mary Jane Leister. Farmer near Attica, Ohio (Seneca Co.). Child- 
ren: Mervin Dean, Doyle Clifford, Elza Bryn, Orlo Raymond, Stella Odessa (Zeiter). 

7. Alvin C. (1900 - 1909) Son of Daniel W. and Susan Basht. North Canton, Ohio. 

8. Ammon (I896 - m. (l) Helen Warner (1902 - (2) Violet M. Schoffstall (cl90$ - 

Son of Ira F. and Elizabeth Miller. Machinist in Lykens, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 
Children: (l) Harry Ammon; (2) None. 

8. Ammon E. (1915 - m. Arlene M. Geiger (1921 - 

Son of Thomas D. and Emma R. Meek. Coremaker, near Hamburg, Pa, (Berks Co.). 
Children: Avalona Arlene (Hartman). 

6. (John) Amos (l862 - 1913) - m. Jennie L. Sherer (I87O - I960) 

Son of David M. and Mary J. Rennecker. Fanner and carpenter in Holgate, Lyons, 
and Wauseon, Ohio. Children: Clyde Eugene. 

6. Amos (1867 - 1935) - ni. Margaret Mc Manis (Bloom) (I867 - I896) 

Son of Hugh and Elizabeth Gangluff . Carpenter and cabinet-maker in New Washington, 
Ohio (Crawford Co.). Children: Charles H. 

6. Amos J. (1858 - 19141) - m. Iva Belle Mangold (I863 - 1931) 

Son of Daniel and Elizabeth Wilson. Tire dealer in Clinton, 111. Children: Fred, 
Minnie Alberta (Strange), Elizabeth (Bess Sumption), Ruth Esther (Barnett), 
Gorma Clara (Orr). 

7. Anea Levi (1895 - 1921) - m. Flossie Ethel Kaufman (I89U - 

Son of Samuel T. and Ida L. Eby. Drayman in Galion, Ohio. Born near Plymouth, 
Ind. Children: Wilbur Amza, Lowell Edward, Gerald Wayne. 

5. Andrew Jacob (l8U5 - 193U) - m. Mary E. Smith (1855 - 1938) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Kocher. Farmer in Seneca and Van Wert Counties, Ohio and 
in Tippecanoe and Huntington Counties, Ind. Died in Ft. Wayne, Ind. Children: 
Harvey Nelson, Elza Elmer, Franklin Earl, Cora (Stuckey), Delia (Hurst), Roxie 
(lynn). ^p 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOFDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Andrew Jacob (190U - m. Edna Marcella Butler (1905 - 

Son of Franklin Earl and Florence E. Miller. Factory machine operator, Ft. Wayne, 
Ind. Children; Rosemary Norma, Patricia Ann (Ulrich), Charles Neal, Dean Wesley. 

9. Andrew James (1963 - Son of Gary L. and Cynthia J. Sharp, Glastonbury, Conn. 

9. Andy (cl958 - Son of Wayne L. and Vesta , Near Kenton, Ohio 

U. Anthony (cl825 - ? ) 

Probable son of Jonathan and Leah Kiehl. Single laborer in Coal Township, Norths 

umberland Co., Pa. in l850; no subsequent record. 

9. Anthony Carl (19U2 - 

Son of Carl and Josephine Rossi, Batavia, N. Y. In U. S, Amy in Korea (1965). 

6. Archie B. (l879 - 1905) - m. Jennie V. Cranpton (l882 - ? ) 

Adopted son of Pitney and Mary A. Burton. Farmer in Henry Co., near Hbgate, Ohio, 
Children: Ernest. 

7. Arleigh Edward (1902 - 1958) - m. Lela Marguerite Westbrook (1902 - 

Son of Milo S. and Clara Jenkins. Carpenter and truck driver in Chicago, 111.; 
born in Clinton, 111. Children: John Westbrook, Herbert Loyal, Robert Edward, 
Donald Eugene. Widow lives in Chicago, 111. 

8. Armar J. (190U - m. Margaret M. Oliver (cl912 - 

Son of Harvey and Stella Darkes. Teacher and storekeeper near Lebanon, Pa. 
Children: Linda Kay (Gearhart). 

7. Arnold B. (I896 - 1956) - m. Coletta Josephine Curtzwiler (l897 - 

Son of Jerry (Jeremiah) and Belle Smith. Railroad clerk in Toledo, Ohio.- Born 
in Defiance, Ohio. Children: Arthur James, Thomas Whalen, Paul Harrison, Helen G. 
(Machalak), Kaiie George, Clifford Arnold, Ned Robert. Widow lives in Toledo, Ohio. 

7. Arthur Chester (cl883 - ? ) - ra. Frances Waldo (Coons) (cl875 - 1952) 

Son of (Henry) Frank and Chestie Ann Manger. Storekeeper, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
No children. 

6. Arthur Clinton (187I - 1937) - m. Anna L. Steel (I872 - 1935) 

Son of Jessias and Sarah Reed. Factory employee in Canton, Ohio. No children. 

7. Arthur E. (1903 - 19U3) - m. Helen Bowels (cl903 - 19Ui) 

Son of Frank E. and Sarah E. Byrnes. Factory power-plant employee, Beloit, Wise. 
Born in Darlington, Wise. Children: Bernice Bernadine (Steffen), Sarah Ann, 
Irvin Elmer. 

7. Arthur Elwood (1911 - m. Catherine Adaline Martin (1912 - 

Son of Charles N. and Daisy M. Ziegler. Operates mens' clothing store in Mt. 
Pleasant Mills, Pa. (Snyder Co.). Children: Donald Junior, Nancy Marie (Helwig), 
Gale Elizabeth (Varner). 

8. Arthur J. (1922 - m. (l) Carrie V. Grahiam (cl922 - (2) Mary M. Yuhas (1936 - 

Son of Paul C. and Minnie Mengel. Maintenance engineer in Tenple, Pa. (Berks Co,). 
Children: (l) Ronald J., Jacqueline A. (Shueman); (2) None. 

100 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOHDNER MALES AM) THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Arthur James (1921 - Unmarried 

Son of Arnold B. and Coletta J. Curtzwiler. Railroad car inspector, Toledo, Ohio. 
Veteran of World T(fer II - U. S. krmy (Corp.). 

6. Arthur U. (cl866 - 19^0) m. Belle Parks (1882 - 19U3) 

Son of David F, and Susan Younkman. Attorney in Canton, Ohio. Born in Bethlehem 
Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. Children: Harold P., Mable (McConkey), Florence (Sellen). 

5. Augustus (1829 - 1909) - m. Catherine Lavin (1839 - 1905) 

Son of Jacob and Magdalena Wolf. Cooper and stonemason in Williamsville , N. Y. and 
Burr Oak, Mich. Operated a drayage service in Burr Oak, Mich. Children: George E., 
Benjamin Franklin. 

5. Augustus L. (1817 - 188$) - m. Henrietta (Harriet) Moyer (l8l5 - 188?) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine Lerch. Farmer in Bethel and Tulpehocken Twps., Berks 
Co., Pa. Children: Mary G., Jonathan Moyer, Tilon Jacob, Emma Elizabeth, Augustus 
Samuel, Isaac (Israel) John, Harriet Rebecca (Lasch). 

6. Augustus Samuel (l8U7 - 1933) - m. Eva C. Anderson (18U9 - 1930) 

Son of Augustus L. and Henrietta (Harriet) Moyer. School teacher in Berks Co., 
Pa. and White Co., Ind. Founded a retail lumber business in Brookston, Ind. Also 
owied several farms near Brookston. Children: Ira Jacob. 

6. Austin E. (l89U - 1936) - m. (l) Nellie J. Rigler (l895 - cl913); (2) Clara Cooper 

(cl900 - ? ) Son of Jeremiah C. and Matilda D. Snyder. Born in Washington Twp., 
Northumberland Co., Pa. Shoemaker in Millersburg, Pa. (Dauphin Co.) Moved to Phil- 
adelphia about 1915. Children: (l) None; (2) Thomas William. 

3. (Joim) Balthaser (Balser) (I778 - 1853) - m. (Maria) Magdalena Emerich (1785-1870) 
Son of Philip Bortner and Maria Elisabetha (Elizabeth) Velt. Changed his name to 
"Bordner". Born in Berks Co., Pa. moved to Stone Valley, Lower Mahanoy T-wp., North- 
umberland Co., Pa. with older brother, Henry. Weaver and farmer. Children: John, 
Jacob, Jonathan, Philip,' Peter, Maria (Molly )(Lahr), Elizabeth (Dockey), Catharine 
(Enderson), Joseph, Isaac, Louisa Ann (Lucy Michael), George. 

9. Barrie Leigh (I96U - Son of Itobert H. and Betty Stine, Denver, Colo. 

9. Barry (19U9 - Son of Belford L. and Rae S. Arrison, near Shamokin, Pa. 

10. Barry Alan (1956 - Son of Philip C. and Doris J. Bloompott, Hurst, Tex. 

9. Barry Bruce (l95l - Son of Titus L. and Edith J. Lenig. Adopted by some other 
family and name changed. 

7. Bart (cl890 - ? ) - m. Names of wives unknown. 

Son of Fremont C. and first wife (name unknown). Changed his name to ••Bartone". 
Probably lived in Pennsylvania. 

8. Belford L. (cl925 - m. Rae S. Arrison (cl926 - 

Son of Clarence F. and Verna Raker. School teacher near Shamokin, Pa. (North- 
umberland Co.). Children: Sue, Barry. 

101 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER NAI£S AND THEIR FAMIIIES i 

$. Benjamin (l8l5 - cl875) - m. Elizabeth (l8lU - 1893) 

Son of Jacob and Elizabeth . Bom in Beaver Tvp., Union Co. (now Snyder Co.), 

Pa., moved to Town of Fayette, Seneca Co., N. Y. about 1829. Laborer and lime- 
burner. Children: Anna (Orman ?), William, Eli, Hannah (Turner), Henry Franklin 
(Frank), Elizabeth (Stahl ?), (Benjamin) Watson. 

$. Benjamin (l825 - cl911i) - m. Mary Ann Enterline (1829 - 1908) 

Son of Peter and Margaret Nuvinger. Carpenter, farmer, and hotel-keeper in Berry- 
sburg, Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Representative in State Legislature, about 
1880. Children: Peter R., Edward N., Catharine Isabella (Cooper), George F., 
Charles Monroe, Robert J. 

5. Benjamin (l8U5 - 1879) - m. Sarah Rose (1852 - ? ) 

Son of Peter and Anna Maria Hepner. Laborer in Washington Twp., Northumberland 
Co., Pa. Children: Daniel W., Mary F. (Martz), Charles R., Emma J., John H. 

6. Benjamin (I876 - 1956) - m. Catharine Reiser (l882 - 19U9) 

Son of Isaac and Harriet Reichenbach. Laborer in Northumberland, Pa. Children: 
Harriet Ruth (Ford), Grace Mildred (Zeigler - Adams), Roy Nelson, William Benja- 
min, George Lester, Shirley Margaret (Doebler). 

7. Benjamin (1879 - 1927) - m. Maude ( ? - ? ) 

Son of Frank (Henry Franklin) and Chestie Ann. Manger. Lived in Seneca Falls, 
N. Y. No children. 

8. Benjamin (cl926 - m. Hoover (cl930 - 

Son of Frank and Mary Alice Blett. Born in Northumberland Co., Pa., lives in 
Williamsport, Pa. No other information. 

8. Benjamin Earl (19U2 - m. Jean Ann Robinson (19U2 - 

Son of Earl B. and Amy E. Anderson. Electric lineman in Goshen, Ind. Bom in 
Fawn River Twp., St. Joseph Co., Mich. No children. 

5. Benjamin Franklin (1828 - 1899) -m. Frances Adaline Blodgett (I83I - I898) 

Son of Philip and Mary Ann Guest, ohoemaker in Attica, Ohio (Seneca Co.), La- 
fayette, Ind., and Circleville, Kansas. Children: Alice May, Florence Luella 
(Brown), Cassius M. C, Kittie Belle (Moore), Charles Selwyn. 

5. Benjamin Franklin (I8UI - 1928) - ra. Mary Dunlap (18U3 - 1928) 

Son of Jacob and Magdalena Wolf. Born in Williamsville, N. Y., lived in Fawn 
River Township, St. Joseph Co., Mich. Farmer. Veteran of Civil War - Sgt., 
Co. D, 11th Mich. Inf. Children: Ralph Lloyd, Guy Dunlap, Mark Wade. 

6. Benjamin Franklin (I86I - 19hO) - m. Caroline (Carrie) Betcher (I872 - 

Son of Augustus and Catherine Lavin. Drayman in Burr Oak, Mich. Children: 
Hazel Irene (Thrasher). Widow lives in Burr Oak, Mich. 

8. Berlyn L. (I9lli - 1928) Son of Tolan and Mabel Prose. Lewistown, 111. 

8. Bernard Lee (1951 - Son of Leonard L. and Virginia Broward. Sawyer AFB, Mich. 

Bert (see Albert) 

102 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOHDNER MALES AND THSIR FAMILIES 

9. Blair Michael (1961 - Son of Earl E. and Betty B. Sharp, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

8. Bobbie Orville (1936 - m. Kathryn A. Reed (1939 - 

Son of Irvin A. and Josephine E. Hilbush. Meat cutter, Herndon, Pa. (Northumber- 
land Co.). Children: Scott Allen. 

7. Boyd F. (1926 - m. Lorraine A. Deppen (1926 - 

Son of Dorsey A. and Maude A. Lubold. Factory laborer, Harrisburg, Pa. Born in 
Jordan Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa.; now lives near Dauphin, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Arny - Staff Sgt. Children: Audrey A., Randall M. 

8. Boyd M. (1899 - m. Katie M. Yerges (l899 - 

Son of Jacob H. and Ida Weaver. Farmer near Bethel, Pa. Children: Blanche E. 
(Witters - ? ), Madeline S. (Achenbach), perhaps others whose names are unknown. 

10. Bradford Earl (1906 - Son of John Jacob and Louetta E. Beard, Lemoyne, Pa. 
10. Bradley (1956 - Son of William Paul Jr. and Fay I. Baeshore, Hummelstown, Pa. 

9. Brent Carroll (i960 - Son of Carroll W. and Mary Lou Snyder, Bloomville, Ohio. 
9. Bret Seeley (i960 - Son of Roy 0. and Mary E. Seeley, Seattle, Wash, 

9. Brian G. (1952 - Son of Herbert C. and Marion Nagle, Strausstown, Pa. 

9. Bruce (19U5 - Adopted son of William Augustus and Opal DeFreese, Winter Haven, 

Fla. 

10. Bruce Alan (1962 - Son of Warren W. and Elva Heisey, near Palnyra, Pa. 
9. Bruce Edward (l95l - Son of Herbert L. and Ella Majewski, Chicago, 111. 

8. Bruce Lloyd (19U0 - m. Helen Beth McLauchlin (19U0 - 

Son of Earl B. and Amy E. Anderson. Born in Fawn River Township, St. Joseph Co., 
Mich. Student of engineering, Angola, Ind. No children. 

9. Bruce Neal (I96I - Son of Jack E. and Martha Davis, Uniondale, Ind. 

9. Bruce Richard (19U5 - Son of Wilbur A. and Betty Eherenman, Plymouth, Ind. 
8. Bruce Smith (1956 - Son of Ray and Dorothy Keeney, Quaker Hill, Conn. 

10. Bryian Keith (196U - Son of Ernest E. and Alma J. Strohecker, near Herndon, Pa. 

7. Burdette David (1899 - m. Ethel Ellen Hoffman (1905 - 

Son of Jesse V. and Fannie Cooper. Farmer near Holgate, Ohio (Henry Co.). Child- 
ren: Norma Jean (Smoot), Lowell Wayne. 

6. Burton Florce (l895 - Unmarried. 

Son of Isaac (Isaiah) and Elizabeth Ashenfelter. Auto plant employee, Flint, 
Mich. Born in Richfield Twp., Henry Co., Ohio; also lived in and near Midland, 
Mich. ,g^ 



\ 



■ 



PARI B •» REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. (John) Calvin (l8U2 - 1862) - Unmarried 

Son of Michael and Leah Buchtel. Montgomery Tvp., Wood Co., Ohio. Died in 
Tennessee in military service during the Civil War. Priv. Co. C, 72nd Ohio Inf, 

7. Calvin Donkel (I87O - ? ) - m. Unknown 

Son of William H. and Amanda Donkel. Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. No children. 

8. Calvin P. (1907 - 19i49) - m. Mollie P. Balthaser (cl912 - 

Son of Robert P, and Agnes Fidler. Farmer in Tulpehocken Twp,, Berks Co., Pa. 
Children: Richard C. 

Carl (also see Karl) 

8. Carl (cl900 - 1965) - m. Name unknown 

Son of John C, and Any Dietz. Lived at one time in vicinity of Monroe, Wise. 
Veteran of World War I. No children. 

8. Carl (1913 - m. Josephine Rossi (1917 - , 

Son of Sanford and Anna Beck. Machinist and shop lead-man, Batavia, N. Y. Child- I 
ren: Anthony Carl, Anne Maria (Grazio plane), Peter Jude. 

7. Carl (1919 - 1920) Son of Klza E. and Clara M. Ziegler, Huntington Co., Ind. 

7. Carl Hugh (1902 - 1902) Son of Adam F, and Louisa Huber, New Washington, Ohio. 

8. Carl James (1928 - ra. Gladys Carpenter (1928 - 

Son of Conde R. and Margery Trombley. Processing engineer, Battle Creek, Mich, 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Axmy - Priv. Children: Gary Wayne, Ronald, Larry. | 

8. Carl Strayer (1920 - m. Jean Neuschwander (1925 - 

Son of Raymond E. and Ina Strayer. Bulk petroleum distributor, Dakota, 111. 
Children: Margaret, Arlene, Ray, Larry. 

8. Carl Vernon (1929 - m. Mary Lou Bannister (1938 - 

Son of Dayton A. and Telsa K. Taylor. Salesman, Galesburg, 111. Born in Lewis- 
town, 111., also lived in Cuba, 111. Children: Michael Eugene, Mark Alan. 

9. Carlen Robert (1929 - m. Evelyn Louise Weitzel (1931 - 

Son of Adam Cyrus and Esther C. Potteiger. Electrician, West Lawn, Pa. Born in 
Strausstown, Berks Co., Pa. Children: Darrel Lane, Ellen Louise. 

8. Carleton Alfred (I9lil - Unmarried 

Son of William H. and Bernice L. Brown, St. Petersburg, Fla. In U. S. Navy. 

8. Carol Richard (19U0 - m, Joyce Ann Overholser (I9U0 - 

Son of William S. and Mary E, Mann. Farmer near Bringhurst, Ind. (Carroll Co.). 
Children: Todd Richard. 

7. Carol Herbert (I908 - m. Ellamae Bernice Huff (I9lli - 

Son of Milo S. and Clara Jenkins. Truck driver, Chicago, 111. In U. S. Air 
Force in 1920's. Children: Carolyn Marie (Carle), Judith Ann, Linda Lee. 

lOU 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND T HBIR FAMIL IES 

8. Carroll Walter (1933- m. Mary Lou Snyder (1935 - 

Son of Walter A. and Esta M. Moyer. Factory worker, near Bloomville, Ohio. Also 
lived near Attica and Chatfield, Ohio (Seneca County). Children: Bonnie Kay, 
Brent Carroll. 

9. Gary Lee (1951 - Son of (Earl) Lee and Ruth B. Helle, Snithfield, 111. 

6. Cassius M. C. (l859 - 1893)- m. Mary Loretta Weaver (1861 - 193U) 

Son of Benjamin Franklin and Frances A. Blodgett. liailroad brakeman, Atchison 
and Circleville, Kansas. Children: Bertha (Zavitz); others died in infancy. 

8. Cecil De Wayne (1938 - m. Helen Marie Hinton (19U3 - 

Son of William H. & Bernice L. Brown. Greenhouse worker, Pinellas Park, Fla. 
Children: Judy Lynn, Ruth Ann, Nancy. 

7. Cecil Lyle (l89h - m. Elizabeth Marie Baskfield (I898 - 

Son of William S. & Polly Ann Hoch. Tax and land agent for an electric railway 
company, Los Angeles, Calif. Born in Stanton, Nebr., now lives in Alhambra, 
Calif. Veteran of World War I - U. S. Arny Engineers - Priv. No children. 

5. Charles (I808 - ? ) Died young. Son of Godfrey and Sarah Glaser, Bethel Twp., 

Berks Co., Pa. 

6. Charles (cl850 - 1925) Unmarried 

Son of Moses and Maria A. Bearce. Farmer, Lewistovm Twp., Fulton Co., 111. and 
near Old Glory, Tex. 

6. Charles (l875 - 1926) Unmarried 

Son of Percival and Lovina Miller. Painter. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa.j 
died nearby in Lebanon Co., Pa. Also lived in Newark, N. J. 

9. Charles (1956 - 1956). Son of Kenneth and Alice Vogel, Morrison, 111. 

6. Charles A. (l855 - cl936) - m. Audrey Van Eiderstein (Morgan) (cl860 - ? ) 

Son of George and Catharine Phillips. Born in Williams ville, N. Y.j lived also 
in Burr Oak, Mich.; Chicago, 111.; Pasadena, Calif.; and Imperial Valley, Calif. 
Laborer. Children: Hattie Marie (Schellenberg). 

8. Charles A. (cl922 - m. Grace A. Klock (1923 - 

Son of Clarence F. & Elizabeth E. Wilt. Auto-agency service-manager, Selinsgrove, 
Pa. (Snyder Co.). Born in Jackson Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: 
Dorothea M. (Stahl). 

9. Charles A. (1937 - m. Elsie I. Woll (1937 - 

Sonof Jacob Jeffrey and Katie R. Scholl. Factory-maintenance worker, Enola, Pa. 
Born in Joliett, Pa.; also lived in Mechanicsburg, Pa. Children: Kenneth Allen. 

7. Charles Albert (1909 - m. Edith Louise Bazzoni (1911 - 

Son of Harry C. & Nona Honsberger. Chemist, Du Pont Company, Wilmington, Del. 
Born in Tiffin, Ohio; also lived in Salem, Mass., New York City, and Niagara 
Falls, N. Y. Children: Charles Albert, Richard Bazzoni. 

105 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALBS AND THEIR FAMILISS 

8. Charles Albert Jr. (1937 - m. Plryllis Jean Puckett (1938 - 

Son of Charles A. and Edith L. Bazzoni. Research fellow and lecturer in pii^sica, 
Harvard University. Lives in Vfatertown, Mass. Children: Karen Sue. 

6. Charles Alfesta (186? - 1953) - m. Rosa Bell Meglasson (1866 - 19Uli) 

Son of Alfred and Jane Hasson. Farmer and stockman in Stephenville, Tex. (Erath 
Co.). Born in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111., lived in Tex. most of life. 
Children: (Lida) Blanche (Jones), Rena May (Benton - Jordan), Daniel Alfred, 
Clyde Edward, George Webster, Mary Jane (Anderson). 

6. Charles B. (l8U3 - 1917) - m. Sarah J. Kuntz (18U7 - 1918) 

Son of George and Wilhelmina Klein. Farmer, school-teacher, and keeper of a gen- 
eral store in Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. No children. 

7. Charles Dewey (1912 - 1953) - m. Ruth Enid Hart (cl9l5 - 

Son of George E. and Edna M. Stutsman. Owned and managed retail radio, T. V. and 
appliance stores in Honolulu, Hawaii. Born in York Twp., Elkhart Co., Ind. 
Children: Enid, Janet, Charles Dewey. Widow lives in Honolulu. 

8. Charles Dewey Jr. (cl95l - Son of Charles D. Ruth E. Hart, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

7. Charles E. (1869 - I89O) Son of David H. and Lydia A. Bonawitz, Colfax Twp., 
Huron Co., Mich. Bom in Upper Paxton Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa, 

7. Charles E. (I889 - 19h5) - m. Isabel Garrish (1895 - 

Son of Leah Sofia Bordner, unmarried. Railroad watchman, Sunbury, Pa. (North- 
umberland Co.). Adopted child: Jane Louise (Hummel). Widow living in Sunbury. 

7. Charles Edgar (I88I - 1962) - ra. Margaret L. Keefer (I883 - 1965) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Matter. Laborer and farmer, Jefferson Twp. and Upper Pax- 
ton Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: Jacob Jeffrey, (Charles) Edgar, Alma K. 
(Shadle), Jessie (Kitchen), (Elva) Margaret (Snyder), (James) Luther Eugene, 
Mae W. (Dorman), Sylvia Alverta (Straw). 

7. Charles Edgar (I88I - 19U9) - m. Sarah Usher (l879 - 1959) 

Son of Daniel M. and Alice M. Ott, originally named '*Edgar Charles". Grain- 
buyer in Delmont and Highmore, South Dakota; also lived in Dakota Twp., Steph- 
enson Co., Ill,, near South Wayne and Marshfield, Wise. Children; Alice ( Br ummel), 
Minerva (Serr), Evelyn (McLaughlin), Howard Charles, Robert Usher, Raymond Edgar. 

6. Charles Edward (l865 - 1917) - m. Grace M. Bateman (l38l - 195U) 

Son of Jonathan and Mary (Sadie) Mace. Born in De Kalb Co., Ind. Railroad engin- 
eer in Ggden, Provo, and Salt Lake City, Utah. Children: William Clinton, Jack, 
(Eva Daisy) Arietta (Beckman). 

7. Charles Edwin (1873 - 1956) - m. Ella M. Foesig (I87O - 1957) 

Son of Daniel J. and Rufina Lerch. Cigarmaker, Lebanon and Reading, Pa. Born in 
Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. No children. 

5. Charles F. (l85U - 1921) - m. (l) Martha Ellen Coleman (l8i49 - I888); (2) Addie 
Dippery (cl85l - 1920). Son of Michael and Catharine Koppenheffer, Leather- fin- 
isher and salesman in Wilmington, Del. Born in Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 
No children. -q^ 



PART B - REG I STER OF B QRDNSR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 
^. Charles H. (l882 - 1885) Son of Jesse and Mary A. Burk, Holgate, Ohio. 

7. Charles H. (I896 - 3955) - m. Alverda Minerva Klink (1903 - 

Son of Amos and Margaret McManis (Bloom). Laborer, New Washington, Ohio (Crawford 
Co.). Children: Audra Emraaline (Jacobs), Donald Charles, Berdine Caroline(Emerson). 

8. Charles Homer (1900 - m. Florence Harriet Hansen (Dennis) (cl900 - 

Son of Noah B. and Dora E. King. Telegraph lineman. Salt Lake City, Utah. Bom 
in Holgate, Ohio (Henry Co.) also lived in Delphos, Ohio and Helper, Utah. Child- 
ren: Charlene Harriet (Bap is). 

8. Charles Howard (I91I4 - m. Esther A. Carl (l9lli - 

Son of Roy J. and Margaret England. Printing pressman, Huntington, Ind. Born in 
Brookstom, Ind., also lived in Kokomo, Ind. Children: Patricia Mae (Schory), 
Gregory Allen. 

7. Charles Leslie (1907 - 1957) - m. Nina Schneyerof (cl910 - 

Son of (Henry) Shannon and Franc L. Burgett. Born in Lewistown, 111. Pharmacist 
in San Diego, Calif.; Price, Utah; Granite City, 111. and St, Louis, Mo. No 
children. Widow remarried - now Mrs. Henry McMullen, Venice, 111. 

7. Charles Lester (l857 - 190?) - m. Nettie E. Folgate (l857 - 1917) 

Son of David and Jane Irwin. Farmer and factory worker in Nodaway Co., Mo. and 
Ft. Dodge, la. Born in Buckeye Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. Children: Pearl (Barclay) 
Elwyn Roy, Chester Ray, Clyde Clarence, Hazel D. (Chapman), Jay Clifford, Terrance 
Jennings, Lawrence Merrill, Charles Lester, Russell Monroe. 

8. Charles Lester Jr. (1889 - m. (1) Nova Hinton (1889 - ? ); (2) Thelma Josephine 

Newhouse (1902 - . Son of Charles L. and Nettie E, Folgate. Foundry worker, 
Clinton, Wise. Also lived in Nodaway Co., Mo. and Ft. Dodge, la. Veteran of World 
War I - U. S. Array Inf. Children: (l) Margaret M. (Bailey), Ramona (Fisher); (2) 
Charles R., Betty Jane (Keith). 

6. Charles Levi (I868 - I9U8) - m. Annie Hartman (cl875 - ? ) 

Son of Thomas L. and Melinda Schneider. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Tin- 
smith in Schaefferstown, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). Children: Mollie Melinda (Long), 
George. 

8, Charles Mann (l9U2 - Son of William S. and Mary E. Mann, Cutler, Ind. Lives with 
mother, now Mrs. Ray Cloe, Greenwood, Ind. 

6. Charles Monroe (I863 - 1952) - m. Laura Whitely (I868 - 1963) 

Son of Benjamin and Mary Ann Enterline. Born in Berrysburg, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 
Dentist in Shenandoah, Pa. (Schuylkill Co.). Children: Charles Monroe, Dolores. 

7. Charles Monroe Jr. (1895 - I896) - Son of Charles Monroe and Laura Whitely. 

8. Charles Neal (1935 - m. Marcella Margaret Shady (1936 - 

Son of Andrew Jacob and Edna Marcella Butler. Mechanic, Ft. Wayne, Ind. Children: 
Mark Andrew (adopted). 

107 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Charles Nelson (l879 - 1957) - m. Daisy Mae Ziegler (1885 - 

Son of Henry Milton and Sarah Seiler. Farmer near Miserville and Mt. Pleasant 
Mills, Pa. (Snyder Co.). Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa, 
Children: Clarence Emerson, Henry Leroy, George Nelson, Arthur Elwood, Norman 
Franklin. 

6. Charles R. (l67U - 1956) - m. Olive F. Schreffler (cl880 - ? ) 

Son of Benjamin and Sarah Hose. Born in Washington Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa,, 
lived in Herndon, Pa. Children: Frederick Clarence (Clarence Frederick), Mabel 
Edna (Latsha), Ray Benjamin, Irvin Alfred, Nelson Edwin, Cora Alda (Michael), 
Gertrude, Verna A. (Unger). 

9. Charles R. (1922 - Unmarried. 

Son of Charles L. and Nova Hinton. Farmer near Clinton, 1*130. 

9. Charles Roy (19U6 - Son of Hay 0. and Mary E. Seeley, Seattle, Wash. 

7. Charles S. (1866 - 1928) - m. Emma L. Guinter (l86U - 1950) 

Son of Jacob K. and Ellen L. Fehr. Farmer in Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., Ill, 
No children. 

6. Charles Selwyn (l869 - 19hQ) - m. Ruth Lenore Brassbridge (cl870 - 1902) 

Son of Benjamin Franklin and Frances A. Blodgett. Operated a meat-market and 
restaurant and kept bees, Circleville, Kansas. Children: George Selwyn. 






8. Charles Selwyn II (1925 - m. Billie Katherine Kaho (1926 - 

Son of George Selwyn and Nell Mathilda Hurrel. Real estate broker, housing de- 
veloper, and general contractor, Raytown, Mo. (near Kansas City). Veteran of 
World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: Cathie Ann, Dennis Allan, William Charles. 

6. Charles Simon (I87U - I960) - ra. Lana Anne Burkholder (I878 - 1 

Son of William and Sarah Ann Snyder. Lumber-yard foreman, Muncie, Ind. Born in 
Columbia Township, Whitley Co., Ind., also lived in Gaston, Ind. and Moline, 111. 
Children; Martha A. (Gibson). Widow lives in Moline, 111. 



9. Charles Vaughn (19U8 - Son of Rayiaond E. and Maunda , Harney, La. (?). 



6. Charles W. (1865 - 1906) Unmarried. 

Son of John Washington and Sarah E. Stigner. Barber in Ligonier, Ind. (Noble Co,).-? 

6. Charles W. (1873 - 1906) - m. Ella May Buhr (Pawling) (I876 - ? ) 

Son of Isaac and Harriet Reichenbach. Farmer and carpenter near Milton and in 
White Deer Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: Clarence W., Paul W. 

6. Charles W. (1875 - ? ) - m. (l) Hortense Leslie Lockhart (cl880 - ? ); (2) ? 
Son of Jacob and Sarah Coler. Bom in Florence Twp., Williams Co., Ohio, lived 
near Vernon, Tex. and in Montana. Children: (2) Julia Elizabeth; (2) Unknown. 

8. Charles W. (1919 - 1921) Son of Ira and Lillian Spain, De Soto, Dallas Co., Tex, 

6. Charles Washington (I86I - 19U0) - ra. (1) Sarah Alice Foster (I86I - 1910); (2) 
Shirley Jay Oliver (1882 - 1939). Son of Peter and Nancy J. Shortnes. Born in 
Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Farmer near Ovilla (Ellis Co.) and De Soto 
(Dallas Co.), Tex. Children: (1) Iota K. (Baumer), Lou Otho, Ira, Ruby Temper- 
ance (Morris); (2) Rosa Belle (Plummer). 

108 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOHDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Charles William (1920 - m. Emma Lee Fambrough (1919 - 

Son of Clyde E. and Esther Ha tier. Manager and part owner of feed mill, near 
Brewster, Wash. Born in Chalk Mountain, Tex. Veteran of World War II - U. S. 
Air Force - Major. Children: Charles William, Leemill, Truman Greg. 

9. Charles William Jr. (19U2 - ra. Vicke Pennell (cl9U2 - 

Son of Charles William and Emma L. Fambrough. Factory worker, Dallas, Tex. 
No children. 

8. Chester R. (1912 - Unmarried. Son of Jason E, and Myrtle Devies, North Canton, 0. 

8. Chester Ray (188^ - 195$) - m. Cora L. Keister (1886 - 

Son of Charles L. and Nettie E. Folgate. Moulder, Rockford, Rock Grove, and Free- 
port, 111. Children: Kenneth Burrel, Marion A. (Dobnick), Paul Leland. 

10. Chris Allen (1962 - Son of Ernest E, and Alma J. Strohecker, near Herndon, Pa, 
8. Christopher (1953 - Son of William H. and Susan Labadie, Concord, Calif. 

10. Christopher David (196U - Son of James D. and Mary K. Milliatt, Washington, Pa. 

7. Clare Eugene (l897 - m. Willie Mary Shearman (1900 - 

Son of Ralph L. and Viola J. Evertt. Farmer and livestock dealer. Fawn River 
Township, St. Joseph Co., Mich. Children: Clare Eugene, Ralph Lowell. 

8. Clare Eugene (1935 - 1935) Son of Clare E. and Willie M. Shearman. 

8. Clarence (1903 - m. Martha Erickson (1905 - 

Son of Samuel and Letticie Boals. Farmer near Dakota, 111. (Stephenson Co.), 
Children: Thomas E. 

7. Clarence (cl923 - cl923) Son of Vernon E. and Cleo M. Collins, Seneca Co., Ohio, 

6. Clarence Augusta (l89U - 1962) - m. Name unknown. 

Son of Frederick M. and Matilda McCurtain. Farmer near Clinton, S. C. Born in 
Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: Clarence Thomas. 

7. Clarence Emerson (1902 - 1930) - m. Mary Esther Reich (Bahner) (1905 - 

Son of Charles N. and Daisy M. Ziegler. Laborer in Sunbury, Pa. (Northumberland 
Co.). Children: Titus Leroy. Widow lives in Sunbury, Pa. 

7. Clarence Finley (1883 - 19Ul) - m. Amelia Greenwalt (l88U - 

Son of Finley B. and Clara J. Krisher. Butcher and meat-cutter in Massillon, Ohio 
(Stark Co.). Also lived in Akron, Ohio. Children: Edna Clair (Kirby), Earl Clar- 
ence, Grace Olive (Lahmers), Harold, Alice Mae (Vogt). 

7. Clarence Frederick (1897 - 1925) - m. (l) Elizabeth Edna Wilt (1902 - (2) Verna 

M. Raker (cl905 - . Son of Charles R. and Olive F. Schreffler. Laborer near 
Herndon and elsewhere in Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: (1) Charles A.; 
(2) Belford L., Arvella (Grim). 

8. Clarence Frederick (1900 - m. Leone Brittain (1901 - 

Son of Cloyd E. and Emma Keppler. Caretaker of light and water system, Bryan, 
Ohio (Williams Co.). Children: Mary Brittain. 

109 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Clarence Leithmann (1872 - 19U7) - m. Helen L. Rinewalt (l873 - ? ) 

Son of Jacob C. and Celia Leithmann. Clerk in Philadelphia, Pa, No children. 

7. Clarence Thomas (cl920 - 

Son of Clarence A. Lives in or near Clinton, S. C. No other information. 

7. Clarence W. (l899 - 195?) - m. Iva Jane Gamberling (1897 - 

Son of Charles W. and Ella M. Buhr (Pawling). Musician, music-teacher, and piano 
-tuner. Lived in Northumberland and elsewhere in Northumberland Co., Pa. Child- 
ren: Orpha A. (Wagner), Lena (Miller - Mutschler), Pearl Arlene (Boardman-Umholtz) 

8. Clarence William (1899 - 1965) - m. Elsie Leah Hartman (l9lli - 

Son of Thomas D. and Emma R. Meek. Railroad-maintenace worker, near Hamburg, Pa. 
(Berks Co.). Children: Clarence William, Garnetta Elsie (Kauffman). Widow lives 
near Hamburg, Pa. 

9. Clarence William Jr. (1931 - m. Ruth Pearl Nevin (193U - 

Son of Clarence W. and Elsie L. Hartman. Milling-machine operator, near Bernville, 
Pa. (Berks Co.). Children: David Clarence, Cathy Mae, Denise Ruth. ,, 

I' 
8. Clark Edmund (I9l6 - m. La Verne Lorene Redenbaugh (1917 - 

Son of Willis E. and Katherine Clark. Railroad shop supervisor, Topeka, Kansas. 

Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army - Sgt. Children: Deborah Mae, Douglas Clark. 

6. Clark Ellis (l88U - 1928) - m. (l) Corda D. Bennett (cl885 - ? ); (2) Hazel Czar- 

ina Miller (1895 - • Son of Daniel and Anna Whitmer. Real estate broker in 
Canton, Ohio. Also lived in Fostoria, Ohio. Children: (2) Clark Ellis, Clifford 
Duane, Ruth Eileen (Baer). 

7. Clark Ellis Jr. (1918 - m. Dorothy Frances Crow (cl920 - 

Son of Clark E. and Hazel C. Miller. President, Empire Wood Products, Inc., 
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. Born in Canton, Ohio. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Air 
Corps - Sgt. Children: Donald Earl, Clark Ellis III. M ^ 

8. Clark Ellis III (19U9 - Son of Clark E. and Dorothy F. Crowe, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, i ■j^ 

7. Claude Levi (1900 - Unmarried. 

Son of George C. and Mary M. Berger. Professor, Pennsylvania State College, I 
Bloomsburg, Pa, (Montour Co.) 

8. Claude M. (I9l6 - m. Name unknown. 

Son of Emanuel S. and Eliza Ann Kistner. Lives in Sunbury, Pa. (Northumberland 
Co.). No children. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army. 

7. Clayton (cl893 - ? ) Unmarried. 

Adopted son of Geary and Gertrude Wise, Hazleton, Pa, Veteran of World War I - 
U. S, Amy. Lived in Philadelphia. No children. 

7. Clayton Delbert (l897 - m. Laura A. Pratt (1902 - 

Son of Harry and Sarah Revert. Farmer near Attica, Ohio (Huron Co.). No children. 

I 

110 ' 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAKELIKS 

8. Clayton De Witt (1901 - I96U) - m. Hazel Mitzkogen (1903 - I96I) 

Son of William H. and Lillie I. Gottschall. Lawyer in Detroit, Mich.; lived in 
Ann Arbor, Mich. Born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: Clayton 
De Witt Jr., Deneese Hawkins (McGhee). 

9. Clayton De Witt Jr. (1932 - 

Son of Clayton De Witt and Hazel Mitzkogen, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

7. Cleo Lynn (1897 - 1911). Son of Edwin L. and Ida A. Snyder, Wood Co., Ohio. 

7. Cleve (Ira Clifford) (I898 - m. Name unknown 

Son of William C. and Addie Cooper. Real estate broker, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Born in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Veteran World War I - U. S. Army - 
Sgt. No children. 

8. Clifford Arnold (1935 - m. Rose Anne Anderson (1939 - 

Son of Arnold B. and Coletta J. Curtzwiler. Gas company inspector, Toledo, Ohio. 
Children: Margo Anne, Clifford Arnold Jr., Lori Marie, Patricia Sue, Barbara Anne. 

9. Clifford Arnold Jr. {I9$h - . Son of Clifford A. and Pbse A. Anderson, Toledo, Ohio, 
8. Clifford Daniel (19U8 - . Son of Clifford D. and Muriel G. Sigler, Akron, Ohio. 

7. Clifford Duane (1920 - m. Muriel Grace Sigler (1923 - 

Son of Clark E. and Hazel C. Miller. Born in Canton, Ohio. Owner of Grapette 
Bottling Co., Akron, Ohio. Veteran World War II - U. S. Army - 2nd Lieut. 
Children: Barbara Jo, Clifford Daniel, Denis Duane. 

8. Clifford Franklin (1911 - m. Alma Grace Kemrer (I9l5 - 

Son of Samuel A. and Rosa Yerges. Born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Truck mechanic, Harrisburg, Pa. Children: Freda D., Gladys L., Clifford Frank- 
lin Jr., Robert E., Althea K. 

9. Clifford Franklin Jr. (19^2 - . Son of Clifford F. and Aljma G. Kemrer, Harrisburg. 

7. Clifford H. (1899 - 1930) - m. Jessie Bailey (cl900 - 

Son of James E. and Leoria S. McLouth. Factory worker, Lewistown, 111. and 
Crandon, Wise. Children: Joyce. 

6. Clifton (1885 - 1895). Son of Moses and Margaret Ewers, Near Lewistown, 111. 

7. Clinton Ray (1877 - 1929) - m. Martha C. Stoyer (l879 - 19U8) 

Son of Serenus J. and Maria E. . Born in Bethel, Pa. (Berks Co.). 

Railway-mail clerk, lived in Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: Isabel (Kirkhoff); per- 
haps others, names unknown. 

7. Clinton Valentine (1882 - 1938) Unmarried. 

Son of Jacob and Rebecca Zeller, Born in Bethel, Pa. (Berks Co.). Supervisor 
in rubber plant, Akron, Ohio. Also lived in Lebanon, Pa. 



Ill 



■5 



ji 



PARI B - HEGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Cloyd A. (1918 - m. Verna I. Latsha (1919 - 

Son of Harry A. and Grace J. Hoch. Railroad carpenter, Herndon, Pa. (Northumber- 
land Co.). Children: Glenn Allen, Joan Irene(Sechrist). 

7. Cloyd Ellsworth (188I - 19U6) - m. Emma Keppler (I88I - 19hh) i\ 

Son of John E. and Catherine E. Friend. Farmer and factory worker, Montpelier, 
Ohio. Children: Clarence Frederick, Esther May (Haines), Edith Marie (Williams), 
Vfayne Eldon, (Ethel) Maxine (Moore). 

7. Cloyd W. (I87U - 192U) - m. Minnie R. Schmaltz (l873 - ? ) 

Son of Isaac J. H. and Amelia L. Wolfersberger. Clerk in Mt. Aetna (Berks Co.) 
and Lebanon, Pa. No children. 

8. Clyde Clarence (I887 - I960) - m. Helen Joselyn (I887 - 

Son of Charles L, aid Nettie E, Folgate. Bom in Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
Mens' clothing designer, Chicago, 111. and New York City and elsewhere. Died in 
De Bary, Fla. Veteran World War I - U. S. krmy. Children: Donald Richard, Dorothy 
A. (Chunn), Dale Joselyn. Widow lives in Winter Park, Fla. 

7. Clyde Edward (I898 - m. Esther Ha tier (1903 - 

Son of Charles A. and Rosa B. Meglasson. Ranch manager, near Iredell, Tex. 
Children: Charles William, Clydena May. 

8. Clyde Edward (1912 - m. Jean Cleo Zimmerman (1920 - 

Son of John H. and Rachel E. Shoop. Born in Dauphin Co., Pa. Molder in Muskegon, 
Mich. Children: Patricia Lou (Mahn), Judy Kay (Kurtz), Edward Dean. 

7. Clyde Eugene (I89O - 1965) - m. Emily C Mettie (1901 - 1961) 

Son of (John) Amos and Jennie L. Sherer. Born in Holgate, Ohio (Henry Co.). Car- 
penter in Wauseon, Toledo, and Oregon, Ohio. Children: John Eugene, Donna J., 
Gerald Dale. 

6. Clyde Everette (1893 - 1956) - m. Bemice Barton (cl900 - 

Son of Isaac (Isaiah) and Elizabeth Ashenfelter. Foreman, Dow Chemical Company 
plant. Midland, Mich. Veteran of World War I - U. S. Army. Children: Elinor 
(Armstrong). Widow lives in Midland, Mich. 

4 

6. Clyde McKinley (l89h - 1950) - m. Dora E. Grimes (cl891 - 

Son of Levi and Mary Jane Waller. Service engineer. National Machine Co., Tiffin, 
Ohio. Children: Dalton Harold, Wayne Melvin, Annabelle, Phyllis J. (Raines). 
Widow lives in Tiffin, Ohio. 

8. Conde Ralph (1919 - 1920) Son of Conde R. and Margery Trombley, Battle Creek,Mich. 

7. Conde Ross (I888 - m. Margery Trombley (I896 - 

Son of William G. and Mary J. Lesley. Born in North Manchester, Ind. Railroad 
conductor. Battle Creek, Mich. Children: Florence Larane (Minor), Bernice Marie 
(Padgett), Conde Ralph, Velma Mary (Castlein-Bartlett-Buyce-Vandenberg), Thelma 
Jennie, Eva Marian (Marian Eva - Banfield), Carl James, Marilyn Ruth, Merle Ross, 
Richard Lee. 

6. Cormon J. (I87O - cl9U7) - m. Ida Efiza Gratz (cl880 - ? ) 

Son of Solomon and Elizabeth Willard. Farmer, Wilmington Twp., DeKalb Co., Ind. 

Children: Gertrude Elizabeth (Wise). 

112 



PART B - REGISTER OF BCffiDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Cornelius (cl880 - cl88U) Son of Elijah and Susan Hossler, Crawford Co., Ohio. 
10. Craig A. (1959 - Son of William P. and Fay I. Basehore, Hummelstovn, Pa. 

9. Craig Anderson (1950 - Son of Craig M. and Dorothy Anderson, Quakertown, Pa. 
9. Craig James (1950 - Son of ftobert L. and Shirley L. Moreland, Sycamore, 111. 

9. Craig Martin (1957 - Son of Guy M. and Cora I. Beadles, East Peoria, 111, 

8. Craig Miller (1923 - m. Dorothy Anderson (1918 - 

Son of Robert Simon and Jeanette von Mengeringhausen. Floor-covering designer. 
Near Quakertown, Pa. (Montgomery Co.). Also lived in Lancaster, Pa, Veteran 
World War II - U. S. Air Corps, 2nd Lt. Children: Sharon Alice, Craig Anderson, 
Jonathan Kyle. 

10. Craig Scott (l96l - Son of James D. and Mary K. Milliatt, Washington, Pa« 

7. Curtin Eugene (1886 - m. Elsie Sryder (cl890 - 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Matter. Laborer and school janitor, Blizabethville, Pa. 
(Dauphin Co.). Children: Marlin Le Roy, Faye Irene. 

9. Curtis C. (19U7 - Son of Herbert C. and Marion Nagle, Strausstown, Pa, 

7. Cyril Francis (1908 - 1920) - Son of Oscar F. and Sylvia A. Dugan, Hugo, Okla. 
Cyrus (also see Josiah) 

6. Cyrus Peter (l85l - 193U) - m. Emma R. Troutraan (l853 - 1930) 

Son of Thomas L. and Melinda Schneider. Farmer in Bethel Twp. and Upper Tulpe- 
hocken Twp., Berks Co., Pa, Children: Mary May (Furraan), John Jacob. 

7. Daine Victor (I89O - 1951 ) - m. Flora Gygax (I896 - 

Son of Wilson M, and Delia Martin. Bom in Munson, Mich. Marine Sup't., U. S. 
Arny Port of Embarkation, Seattle, Wash. Also lived in Honolulu, Hawaii. 
Children; June (Smallwood), Wilson Ernest, Daine Victor, Roy Owen. Widow lives 
in Seattle, Wash. 

8. Daine Victor Jr. (1919 - Unmarried. 

Son of Daine V. and Flora Gygax. Stock-room manager, autombile agency, Seattle, 
Wash. Veteran of World War II. 

9. Dale (1959 - Son of David H. and Dolores Furin, Midland, Texas. 

8. Dale E. (1919 - m. Betty Lou Heisel (1922- 

Son of Sherman E. and Ola T, McCormick. Certified public accountant. Ass't. 
Treas. of U. S. Trotting Ass'n., Columbus, Ohio. Veteran of World War II - U. S, 
Air Corps - Sgt. Children: Michael E,, Jacqueline Ann. 

9. Dale Joselyn (1910 - m. Sybil L. Davis (cl920 - 

Son of Clyde C. and Helen Joselyn. Sales representative, Fresno, Calif. Also 
lived in Omaha, Nebr., Chicago, 111., Davenport, la., Santa Cruz and San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. Veteran World War II - U. S, Amgr Engineers. Children: Dale Robert. 

113 



PARI B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Dale Nelson (1909 - in. Ethel Midkiff (cl910 - 

Son of Floyd W. and Ethel Mae Worley. Architect and builder, Orlando, Fla. Also 
lived in Toledo, Ohio, Asheville, N. C, and Washington, D. C. Children: Shirley 
(Becker). 

10. Dale Robert (1955 - Son of Dale J. and Sybil L. Davis, Fresno, Calif. 

7. Dale Roy (191U - in. Evelyn M. Wilson (19X8 - 

Son of Roy C. and Daisy H. Klahr. Railroad machinist's helper and carpenter, near 
Attica, Ohio. Also lived in Toledo. Children: Douglas Paul, June La Vergne(Keaton).t 

7. Dalton Dwight (I90h - m. Pauline Clements (1909 - 

Son of William S, and Polly Ann Hoch. Real estate appraiser for bank. Long Beach, 
Calif. Born in Stanton, Nebr. Children: Dalton William, Kenneth Merle, Joan 
Louise. 



7. Dalton Harold (1920 - m. Mae Marie Fea sel (cl920 - 

Son of Clyde M. and Dora E. Grimes. Sup't. of machinery mfg.. National Machine 
Co., Tiffin, Ohio. No children. 

8. Dalton William (1936 - m. Susan Wellington (1939 - 

Son of Dalton D. and Pauline Clements. Chemist, Fullerton, Calif. Born in Long 
Beach. Children; Robert Dalton. 

8. Dan Dale (1936 - m. Sharon Ann Hawk (19U1 - 

Son of Walter N. and Helen C. Lee. Auto mechanic, Kendallville, Ind. Lives in 
Hudson, Ind, Children: Dawn Nita, Durinda Rae, Dan Nelson. 

8. Dan Dennis (19U5 - Unmarried. 

Son of Elmer Franklin and Frances M. Johnson. Born in Denver, Colo. News 
director and announcer for radio station. Hickory, N. C. 

9. Dan Nelson (1966 - Son of Dan Dale and Sharon A. Hawk, Hudson, Ind. 

10. Dana Scott (1958 - Son of Hoy E. Jr. and June F. Ballettee, Harrisburg, Pa. 

3. Daniel (cl765 - 18UU) - ra. Eva (Knaeves ?)(?-?) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Bait. Farmer in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Children: 
Jacob, Godfrey, Catharine (Bender), Daniel; perhaps others who died young. 

U. Daniel (l802 - ? ) - m. Mary (cl802 - ? ) 

Son of William and Elizabeth Koppenheffer. Born in Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., 
Pa. Lived in Pitt Twp. and Sewickley, Allegheny Co., Pa. No children. Carpenter. 



< 



i\ 



h. Daniel (l803 - cl8U5) - m. Catharine Viehman (cl803 - ? ) ? 

Son of Daniel and Eva (Knaeves ?). Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa, Children: 
Elizabeth (Ditzler), Isaac, Percival; perhaps others who died young. 

5. Daniel (l807 - 18U2) - m. Hannah Klahr (cl8lO - ? ) 

Son of John and Elizabeth Hoffman. Noted weaver in Millersburg (now Bethel), 
Pa. (Berks Co.). Children: Daniel John Klahr, Henry Klahr; perhaps others 

who died young. 

IIU 



1( 
7. 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOHDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. Daniel (l807 - 1887) - m. Anna Maria Tobias (1808 - 1885) 

Son of Godfrey and Sarah Gasser. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Farmer and 
innkeeper in "Bordnersville", Hanover Twp. (part now in Union Twp.), Lebanon Co., 
Pa. Children: Daniel T. (Tobias ?), John Henry, Catharine (Mrs. Solomon Bordner); 
also at least one other child, name unknown, who died young. 

U. Daniel (l809 - cl8l5) Son of Peter and Catharine Katterman, Upper Paxton Twp. 
(part now in Mifflin Twp.), Dauphin Co., Pa. 

5. Daniel (183? - 1918) - m. Elizabeth Wilson (I836 - 1925) 

Son of John and Barbara Caninger. Raised in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Farmer, blacksmith, and carpenter in Flatrock Twp., Henry Co., Jind in Williams 
Co., Ohio, and in De Witt Twp., De Witt County, 111. Children: Amos J., William 
Henry, (Isaiah) Ira, California (Callie - Huston), Carolina (Carrie - Fuller), 
Milo Sherman, Abner, Frank, Sarah Kate (Taylor). 

5. Daniel (cl833 - 1902) - m. Ursula Gunsenhouser (cl8UU - 192U) 

Son of Philip and Readle. Born in Bethlehem Twp., Stark Co., Pa, Farmer 

and tanner in Stafford Twp., De Kalb Co., Ind. Children: Blanch L. (Lucy) 
(adopted). 

5. Daniel (1835-1910) - m. Matilda Bressler (l839 - ? ) 

Son of Michael and Catharine Koppenheffer. Tailor in Berrysburg, Mifflin Twp.. 
Dauphin Co., Pa, Children: Irvin H. , Anne E., WilliamC, Katie Ellen (B la nning). 

5. Daniel (1837 - 1913) - m, Amanda Shade (l8U3 - 1925) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Kocher. Farmer in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co. and in 
Florence Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. Children: Oscar, Ora H., Alta (Zeiter), Eva 
(Knecht), Nettie (Miller), Flora (Ford - Scranton), (Clara) Emma, Hoy. 

5. Daniel (l8U2 - 1912) - m. Anna Whitmer (l850 - 1916) 

Son of John P. and Sarah Bordner. Born in Bethlehem Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. 
Sawyer and farmer in Swanton Twp., Lucas Co. and in Huron Co., near Alvada, Ohio. 
Children: Edna Ollen (Jefferds), Letty Oliva (Schwab), Emma Elizabeth (Smith), 
Ada Alice, Anna Florence (Harroun), Albert William, Irving Jay, Clark Ellis, 
Earl Emerson, Mable Grace (Myers). 

6. Daniel (185U - 1928) - m, (l) Amanda Rummel (l852 - 1935); (2) Lydia A, Matter 

(1865 - 1936). Farmer in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: John Henry, 
Chauncey Elmer (Elmer Chauncey), Thomas E., Mary E., Samuel A. 

10. Daniel (cl956 - Son of Richard E. and Betty J. David, Lebanon, Pa. 

7. Daniel Alfred (1897 - m. Ina Cornett (1899 - 

Son of Charles A, and Rosa B. Meglasson. Born in Stephenville, Tex. Contractor 
in Ft. Worth, Tex. Children: Wanda Lee (McMains), Sarah Rosa (Allen). 

7. Daniel C. (I879 - I896) - Son of David R. and lydia A. Bonawitz, Bay City and 
Colfax Twp., Huron Co,, Mich. 



115 



PARI B - REGISTER (g BOHDNER MALBS AMD THEIR FAMILIES | 

Daniel Ervin (l88U - m. Mearle Spillette (1881; - I 

Son of Samuel and Leanna Stout. Carpenter in Tiro and New Washington (Cra-wford 
Co.) and Cleveland, Ohio. Now lives in New Washington. Children: Graydon Spillette^ 
Thoburn Emerson, Evelyn Aurilla (Purcell). 



6. Daniel Glancy (1865 - ? ) - m. Abigail ( ? - ? ) 

Son of Percival and Lovina Miller. Street-car motorman or conductor, Newark, N. J. 
Bom in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa., also lived in Tulpehocken Twp., Berks Co., 
and in Cincinnati, Ohio. No children: 

6. Daniel John Klahr (l8U3 - 1912) - m. Rufina Lerch (l8U2 - 1917) 

Son of Daniel and Hannah Klahr. Fanner and laborer in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
and in Myerstown, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). Children: Lilly Elizabeth (Diehl), David 
Tirus, (Henry) Harry Daniel, John Calvin, Charles Edwin, Stephen Oscar, Harriet 
Hannah (Bahney). 

6. Daniel Kline (1832 - 1920) - m. (l) Caroline E. Fehr (l8U3 - 1865); (2) Sarah M. 
Geyer (18U7 - 1917). Son of George and Wilhelmina Klein. Farmer and broom manu- 
facturer in Dakota Township, Stphenson Co., 111. Also lived briefly in Glebe, Va, 
(Albemarle Co.). Children: (l) None. (2) Louisa Christina (Flynn), Howard Jacob, 
Fred (Frederick) Daniel, Ralph Waldo Dubs, (Mary) Mable (May)(Smith), 

6. Daniel M. (I836 - 1901) - m. (l) Martha Patten (I8U0 - I876); (2) Alice M. Ott 
(1856 - 19liO). Son of Jacob and Hannah . Farmer in Dakota Twp., Stephen- 
son Co., 111. and near South Wayne, Wise. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. G, 93rd 
111. Inf. Children: (l) John C, Albert Lawson; (2) Edgar Charles (Charles Edgar). 

9. Daniel Ealph (1927 - m. Betty E. Rose (cl93U - -^ 

Son of Ralph S. and Mary Alice Conrad. Meter-reader in Sunbury, Pa. (Northumber- I 
land Co.). Children: Daniel Ralph, Robert Jeffrey. 

10. Daniel Ralph Jr. (1955 - Son of Daniel Ralph and Betty E. Rose, Sunbury, Pa, 

6. Daniel T. (Tobias ?) (I832 - 1905) - m. Sarah Weaber (l839 - 1915) 

Son of Daniel and Anna Maria Tobias. Farmer and owner of general store in Union 
Twp., Lebanon Co., Pa. (In Bordnersville . ) Children: Elizabeth (Good), Irwin W., 
Cora (Groh), Grant, John Sherman, William, Anna Maria, (Henry) Harry Dawson, 
Daniel W., Jane (Jennie) C. (Speck), Sarah (Sadie - Groh). 

6. Daniel W. (1369 - 19li2) - m. (1) Sarah J. Hoffman; (2) Elizabeth Fetterman (l873 - 

1936). Son of Benjamin and Sarah Rose. Farmer in Washington Twp., Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. Children: (l) JohnF.; (2) (Clara) Minerva (Adams), Verdie E. 
(Sellers), Sarah (Music), Harry A., Herbert Oscar, Edward, Erma. 

7. Daniel W. (l872 - 19h6) - Unmarried. 

Son of Daniel T, and Sarah Weaber. Union Twp., Lebanon Co., Pa. 

6. Daniel Webster (I867 - 1962) - m. Susan Basht (I868 - 1930) 

Son of Jessias and Sarah Reed. Born in Perry Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. Real-estate 
broker in North Canton, Ohio. Children: Oren Earl, Frank Curtis, Alvin C, 
Florence N. 

116 



PART B - REGISTKR OF BORDNER M/LLES AND THBIR FAMILIE S 

7. Darl Eugene (1917 - m. Edith May Langlois (1921 - 

Son of Vernon E. and Cleo M, Collins. Machinist in Vlalbridge, Ohio (Lucas Co.). 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Arn^y. Children: Cleo M. (Snuggs), Darl Eugene, 
Beverly J. (Counterman), Raymond Eugene. 

8. Darl Eugene Jr. (I9h? - m. Patricia Ann Combs (l9Uh - 

Son of Darl E. and Edith May Langlois. Auto-body repairman, Toledo, Ohio. 
Children: Darl Eugene III. 

9. Darl Eugene III (1962 - Son of Darl E. Jr. and Patricia Ann Combs, Toledo, Ohio. 

10. Darrel Lane (1959 - Son of Carlen R. and Evelyn L. Weitzel, West Lawn, Pa. 

8. Darryl W. (1930 - Unmarried. 

Son of Norman J. and Edna Cantrell. Purchasing agent, Oakland, Calif. Born in 
Wichita, Kansas. 

5. David (1812 - I678) - m. Dina (Christina) Schneider (also known as Haute) (l8l5-?) 

Son of John and Elizabeth Hoffman. Farmer in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Child- 
ren; Amelia (Behney), Priscilla Barbara (Brown), Edward H., William H., Isaac 
Jacob H,, Adam H., Isabella (Potteiger), Elizabeth (Eliza) E., Peter. 

6. David (1828 - 1901) - m. Jane Irwin (I83I - 1912) 

Son of Gtjorge and Wilhelmina Klein. Fanner in Town of Fayette, Seneca Co., N. Y. 
and Buckeye Twp. (part later in Dakota Twp.), Stephenson Co., 111. Born in 
Beaver Twp., Union Co., Pa. Children: Klmira (ffyra) (Boyer), Emma (Goodman), 
Charles Lester, Samuel, Solomon, Laura. 

5. David (1838 - I8li2). Son of Michael and Catharine Koppenheffer, Mifflin Twp., 

Dauphin Co., Pa, 

6. David (cl870 - cl87l). Son of David M. and Mary J. Rennecker, Flatrock Twp., 

Henry Co., Ohio. 

7. David (I89U - 1918). Son of David A. and Hettie A. Klinger, Lower Mahanoy Twp., 

Northumberland Co., Pa. Died in France in World War I - U. S. Amy 79th Div. 

9. David (1957 - Son of (James) Luther E. and Marie I. Casey, Millersburg, Pa. 

9. David (1959 - Son of William D. and Dorothy E. Hockenbrack, Northumberland, Pa. 

6. David A. (I86U - 1926) - m. Hettie A. Klinger (I87I - 19U2) 

Son of William and Mary (Polly) Derrick. Farmer in Lower Mahanoy Twp. and Jackson 
Twn., Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: Lloyd Erwin, Mary E. (Stauffer), Anne M. 
(Witmer), David, Carrie Agnes (Martz), William E., Daisy E. (Bohner), Elmer R., 
Hattie I. (Leitzel), John Franklin. 

8. David Alan (1959 - . Son of Ralph B. and Fay E. Mohler, Topton, Pa. (Berks Co.) 

9. David Alan (I96I - . Son of Harold C. and Marjorie Keister, Dakota, 111. 

117 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. David Arthur (1930 - m. Ann M. Catestrain (1930 - 

Son of Harold P. and Harriet Luella McClain. Steel salesman, Canton, Ohio. Also 
lived in Detroit, Mich, and Washington, D. C. Children: Barbara. 

8. David Charles (19U3 - 19li9). Son of Vlilliam H. and Bernice L. Brown, St. Peters- 
burg, Fla. 

10. David Clarence (1953 - . Son of Clarence W. Jr. and Ruth P. Nevin, Bernville,Pa. 

8. David Daniel (19U1 - m. Lenore Mae Granger (Noble) (193$ - 

Son of David S. and Nevella Peninger. Forester, U. S. Forest Service, Grangeville, 
Idaho; also in Durango, Colo, and Missoula, Mont. Born in San Francisco, Calif. 
Children: Laura Lynn, David Daniel. 

9. David Daniel Jr. (1966 - . Son of David D. and Lenore M. Granger (Noble). 

5. David F. (1837 - 1918) - m. Susan A. Younkman (l8liO - 1911) 

Son of Philip and Readle. Teacher and farmer, Bethelehem Twp., Stark Co., 

Ohio. Children: Emma S. (Hiple), Arthur U., Ora Ellen (Albaugh), Franklin V{. 
(Frank), Clara (Zutavern), Alice. 

8. David Howard (1931 - m. Dolores Furin (cl931 - 

Son of Thoburn E, and Miriam L. Griffith. Laborer, Midland, Tex. and Cleveland, 
Ohio. Children: David Howard, Cynthia, Dale. 

9. David Howard Jr. (19514 - . Son of David H. and Dolores Furin, Midland, Tex. 

10. David Lee {l9hQ - . Son of William H. and Joan L. Wimer, Rouserville, Pa. 
8. David Lee (1950 - . Son of Glen and La Moile Scheiber, Mishawaka, Ind. 

8. David Lee (1953 - . Son of itoy E. and Elsie I. Wolf, Linglestown, Pa. 

9. David Leonard (19U6 - . Son of Glen W. and Juliana N. Bane, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

5. David Monet (cl839 - 1925) - m. Mary Jane Rennecker (l81;5 - 1913) 

Son of John and Barbara Caninger. Farmer in Flatrock Twp. Henry Co., Ohio. Child- 
ren: William F., (John) Amos, Florence E. (Flora - Smith), Corabelle (Cummins), 
David, Franklin Nelson (Frank), Jesse Valentine. 

6. David R. (I8li3 - 1903) - m. I,ydia Ann Bonawitz (18U6 - 1936) 

Son of John and Rachael Ramberger. Farmer in Upper Paxton Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 
and in Colfax Twp., Huron Co., Mich. Also lived in Bay City, Mich. Veteran of 
Civil War. Priv. Co. D, 107th Pa. Inf. Children: Charles E., Annie E. (Williams), 
Harry E. (John Charles Ryan), William Edward (Ryan), John David, Daniel C, 
George I., Mary (Sageman). 

8. David Raymond (19U6 - . Son of Raymond H. and Kathryn M. Hensinger, Attica, Ohio. 

9. David Rene' (1952 - . Son of Karl K. and Helen I. Downer, Ruskin, Fla. 

10. David Richard (1952 - . Son of Richard E. and Evelyn P. Berry, Massillon, Ohio. 

U8 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOHDNKR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. David Scott (1951 - • Son of George T. and McKenna, Le«isto>m, 111. 

9. David Scott (1963 - . Son of Samuel D. and Elaine Cupp, Harrisburg, Pa. 

7 David Stanton (I878 - 19hh) - m. (D Ida E. Noecker ( cl880 - 1929); (2) Helen D 
L^Sence (cl880 - 19U9). Son of Isaac J. H. and Amelia L. Wolfersberger Born in 
^t AetnlrPa. (Berks Co.). Physician in Pal^^rra, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). Children: 
(1) Stanton Noecker; (2) None. 

7 David Stirevalt (190? - m. (l) Nevella Peninger (cl910 - ; (2) Amelia Richard- 
7. David Stirevalt ^^ ' ^ ^^ C. and Helene Kruse. Bom in San Francisco, Calif., 

El^ctricaS ■con;rartor inTn An3;i.c, Calif. Children: (1) Diane (Fields); David 

Daniel, Darlene Elma; (2) None. 
9. David Stuart (19U5 - . Son of Stanton N. and Mabel V. Campbell, Atlanta, Ga. 

Children: Gertrude M., Mazie A., Blanche E. (Weaver). 
9. David Wayne (1955 - • Son of Lo.ell W. and Anna J. Bond, near Holgate, Ohio. 
8. Davson M. (1898 - ? ). Died young. Son of Jacob H. and Ida Weaver, Lebanon Co., 

Pa. (probably Swatara Tvrp.) 

o T^ + kir^^A CiRqt^ - 1950) - m. Telsa Kathleen Taylor (I896 - 

7. Dayton Alfred (1«95 - ^l^'^i ^' Riackaby Born in Le-wistown, 111. Brewery- 

10. Dean Scott (1962 - . Son of Warren W. and Elva A. Heisey, Palnyra, Pa. 

8. Dean Wesley (I9hh - . Son of Andrew J. and Edna M. Butler, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

8. Delbert Eugene (1902 - m. Cliva Maria Wagoner (l89 8 - ^^.^^ 

died in childhood). 

8. DeLnar John Benton (1909 - m. Martina Brenner (^909 - ^^^^ ^^^^^ 

Son of Perry J. and Floretta Ba"tz Pres^ of P. ^; f f^-,^„ g^^,,,,, james 
stores), Massillon, Ohao (Stark Co.;, Chiicren. u 
Perry. 

119 



PARI B - REGISTER OF BCHIDNER MIZS AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Denis Duane (I9h9 - . Son of Clifford D. and Muriel G. Sigler, Akron, Ohio 

9. Dennis (1952 - . Son of William D. and Dorothy E. Hockenbrack, Northumberland, Pa, 

9. Dennis Allan (1956 - . Son of Charles S. II and Billie K. Kaho, Raytovn, Mo. 

10, Dennis Howard (1955 - • Son of Weldon L. Jr, and Margie I. Booker, Hillsdale, Mich. 
8, Dennis N, (19U3 - . Unmarried. 

Son of Glen and La Moile Scheiber. Bom in Mishawaka, Ind. Canning-factory 
worker, Broderick, Calif. 

8. Dennis Paul (196U - . Son of Virgil R. and Geraldine L. Hafner, Attica, Ohio. 

7. (Victor) Dewey (1898 - m. Vercie Jewel Kirby (1901 - 

Son of Milo S, and Clara Jenkins. Born in Clinton, 111. Railroad machinist, I 
Decatur, 111. Veteran of Vtorld War I - U, S, Army. Children: Winfred Paul, j 
William Daniel. 

10. Donald (1953 - . Son of Donald C. and Carole Yanosch, Millersburg, Pa. jj 

9. Donald Brooks (19U3 - . Son of Donald E. Jr. and Hazel Brooks, Clifton, N, J. J 

8. Donald Charles (1930 - m. Viola Brunner (1928 - I 

Son of Charles H. and Alverda M. Klink. General foreman, aluminum foundry, New 
Washington, Ohio, Children: Gloria Jean, Randall Allen, Diana Kay. -I 

9. Donald Cleveland (1936 - m. (1) Carole Yanosch (1936 - ;(2) Arlea Klinger (1937- \ 

Son of Oscar and Ifyrtle A. Turner. Shoemaker, mechanic, electrician, Millersburg, « 
Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Also lived in Harrisburg, Pa. Professional football player. I 
Children; (l) Donald} (2) Pamela, Jamie. 

8. Donald Earl (19U7 - . Son of Clark E, Jr. and Dorothy F, Crow, Cuyahoga Falls,0. 
8. Donald Edward (Jr.)(l9lU - m. Hazel Brooks (191U - 

Son of Donald E. and Regina Kines. Textile engineer, Clifton, N, J, Children: J 

Donald Brooks, Donna Jeanne (Verde). 

7. Donald Eranius (cl880 - 1958) - m. Regina Kines (cl882 - 1956) 

Son of John D, W, and Elsie Ehrhart. Born in Shrewsbury, Pa. Traffic manager, 
Standard Fruit and S/S Co., Baltimore, Md., Chicago, 111., Clifton and Washing- 
ton, N. J, Children; John William, Donald Edward. 

8. Donald Eugene (1929 - m. Olga Jean Kozlow (1932 - 

Son of Arleigh E. and Lela M. Westbrook. Sign-painter, Posen, 111. (Chicago 
suburb). Children: Douglas Edward, Timothy Alan, Kerry Jean. 

9. Donald George (l9Ul - m. Patricia H, Kibler (19U2 - 

Son of George D. and Florence Cook. Glass-worker, Warren, Ohio. No children. 

9. Donald Guy (I9i;6 - . Son of Guy W. and Jean Gertrude Yohe, Dornsife, Pa. 

8. Donald Homer (1918 - 19U6) - m. Ora Dell Smith (cl920 - 

Son of Harry H. and Mattie Wilson, near Bedford, Iowa (Taylor Co.). Veteran of 
World War II - U. S. Army - Sgt. Children: Donna Kay (Stewart). 

8. Donald Junior (193U - m, Roseanna Troutman (1939 - 

Son of Arthur E. and Catherine A. Martin. Bom in Snyder Co,, Pa,; now lives in 
Liverpool, Pa. (Perry Co.). No children. 

9. Donald La Rue (cl929 - m. Joan C. Shoop (cl930 - 

Son of William M, and Catherine L. Snyder. Printer, Sunbury, Pa, (Northumber- 
land Co.). Children; Barbara, Susan. 

120 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Donald Lyle (1936 - . Son of Donald W. and Esther G. Gilbert, Burlington, Wash. 

9. Donald Richard (1908 - 19hS) Unmarried. 

Son of Clyde C. and Helen Joselyn. Born in Omaha, Nebr. Died in U. S. Arn^r in 
World War II. 

9. Donald Roy (1939 - m. Judith Marie White (1939 - 

Son of James A. and Genevieve E. Hopkins. Born in Colo. Steel worker, Lebanon, 
Pa. Children: Vincent Anthony. 

7. Donald William (1902 - 1961) - m. Esther Glendora Gilbert (1901 - 

Son of Oscar E. and Ada L. Cooper. Born in Lewistown, 111. Owned and operated 
a motel in Mt. Vernon, Wash. Children: William Gilbert, Donald Lyle, Glenn 
Willard. Widow lives in Burlington, Wash. 

6. Dorsey Allen (l888 - 1963) - m. Maude Amelia Lubold (1907 - 1956) 

Son of Jeremiah C. and Matilda D. Snyder. Farmer in Washington and Jordan Twps., 
Northumberland Co., Pa, Children: John H., Edna M. (Dobson), Roy E., Carrie C. 
(Latsha), Naomi, William S., Gertrude M. (Ross), ^fyrtle P. (Scheib), Jeremiah C, 
Harry Samuel, Elsie M. (Duttry), Boyd F.,Paul Daniel, Thomas Quinton, Esther J. 
(Schaffner), Albert Raymond, Lena I. 

9. Douglas Clark (195U - . Son of Clark E. and La Verne L. Redenbaugh, Topeka, Kans. 

9. Douglas Edward (l95h - . Son of Donald E. and Olga J. Kozlow, Posen, 111. 

8. Douglas Paul (1935 - m. Shirley Ann Reed (1935 - 

Son of Dale R. and Evelyn Wilson. Railroad-car inspector, Attica, Ohio (Seneca 
Co.). Children: Debra Jean, Colleen Ann, Scott Paul. 

7. Doyle Clifford (1905 - m. Alice Lucille Bollinger (1909 - 

Son of Alpha T. and Flora Haefer. Rubber-plant worker, Mansfield, Ohio. Bom 
in Seneca Co., Ohio. No children. 

8. Duane Kline (1920 - m. Jewel Margaret Krahl (1929 - 

Son of Ralph W. D. and Marie V. Engstrom. Commercial artist, Markham, 111, 
(near Chicago). Also lived in Moline, Rock Island, and Chicago, 111. Veteran 
World War II - U. S. Air Corps. Children: Jewelann Nancy. 

6. Earl (1877 - I878) Son of Jerry (Jeremiah) and Sabina Hull, Wood County, Ohio. 

7. (William) Earl (I878 - ? ) 

Son of Albert and Margaret A. Kent. Born in Florence Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. 
Said to have operated a hotel somewhere in the South. No other information. 

6. Earl (cl880 - cl9?0) - ra. Name unknown. 

Son of Elijah and Susan Hossler. Bom in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Factory worker in Toledo, Ohio. Children: A son who died in childhood, name 
ion known. 

7. Earl (I89O - m. Gertrude Motson (1895 - 

Son of Isaac J. and Harriet R. Kantz. Railroad pumper, Pilger, Nebr. Veteran 
World War I - U. S. Ariry. No children. 

121 



PART B - gEJEISTER OF BORDNER MAIJSS AND THKIR FAMILIES 

7. Earl (cl898 -cl898) Son of Samuel T. and Ida L. Eby, Plymouth, Ind. 

7. Earl Benjamin (191? - m. A^y Eunice Anderson (1915 - 

Son of Ralph L. and Viola J, Evertt. Farmer, Fawn River Tvp., St. Joseph Co., 
Mich. Children: Bruce Lloyd, Benjamin Earl, Michael Eric, Laura Jane, Monte Joe. 

7. Earl Charles (1910 - ra. (1) Emily Agnes Bacon (1915 - ; (2) Esther Barbara 

Medina (cl920 - . Son of Oscar F. and Sylvia A. Dugan. Supervisor, U. S. Post 
Office, Los Angeles, Calif. Lives in Pomona, Calif. Bom in Chieago, 111., also 
lived in Daugherty, Iowa and Hugo, Okla. Children (l) Timotl^ Dugan; (2) None. 

8. Earl Clarence (190? - 19U8) - m. Alice May Merrimen (1908 - 

Son of Clarence F. and Amelia Greenwalt. Inspector in steel mill, Massillon, 
Ohio. Children: Shirley May (Vksod), Richard Earl, Janice Clare (Householder). 

8. Earl David (I898 - I966) - m. Edna H. Shive (1912 - 

Son of (Milton) Miles and Dora A. Kline. Postmaster, Bethel, Pa. (Berks Co.). 
Also fanner. Children: Elinor Elaine (Roberts), Elodie Eloise (Chudnovsky), 
Earl David, Eldyne Elyse. Vfidow lives near Bethel, Pa. 

9. Earl David Jr. (19U0 - Unmarried. 

Son of Earl D. and Edna H. Shive. Dental technician, Reading, Pa. Lives with 
mother in Bethel, Pa. 

6. Earl Emerson (1887 - m. Edith Elizabeth Bish (I887 - 1963) 

Son of Daniel and Anna Whitroer. Machinist, Fostoria, Ohio. No children. 

8. Earl Eugene (1930 - m. Betty Bernadette Sharp (193U - 

Son of William H. and Bernice L. Brown. Deputy Sheriff, Pinellas Co., Fla. 
Lives in St„ Petersburg, Flas. Children: Sarah Bernadette, Earl Eugene, William 
Leslie, Robert Earl, Blair Michael, John Paul. 

9. Earl Eugene Jr. (1956 - . Son of Earl E, and Betty B. Sharp, St. Petersburg, Fla, 

8. Earl George (I889 - 1953) - m. Susanna Zimmerman (I896 - 

Son of William J, and Emma L. Lantz. Laborer in Jackson Twp. and in Millergburg, 
Dauphin Co., Pa. Veteran World War I - U. S. Arny. Children: Freeman E., 
William Harris. Widow lives in Millersburg, Pa. 

8. Earl K. (1931 - m. Daisy R. Ferster (I93li - 

Son of Herbert 0. and Lena L. Snyder. Farmer near Dornsife, Pa. (Northumberland 
Co.). No children. 

7. Earl Raymond (1895 - 1962) - m. Blanche M. Stickler (1901 - 

Son of Ruvalon J. and Sarah Ann Schrader. Bom in Whitley Co., Ind. College 
professor, Pennsylvania State University. Lived in Bellefonte and State College, 
Pa. Veteran World War I - U. S. Army Engineers. Children: Doroti^r Louise. Widow 
lives in State College, Pa. 

8. Earl Raymond (I9l8 - m. Jane Evans (1919 - 

Son of Raymond E. and Ina Strayer. Farmer, Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
(On farm purchased from Government in l85l by his great grandfather, George 
Bordner.) Children: Linda (Moore), Donna, Ronald. 

122 



PARI B - REGISTER OF BdENER MAIES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Earl Vernon (1916 - Unmarried. 

Son of Hoy C. and Daisy H. Klahr. Railroad track laborer, Attica, Ohio. 

8. Earl Wayne (1935 - m. Nancy M. Slater (1938 - - 

Son of Ora W. and Geraldine C. Snell. Machine operator. Ft. Wayne, Ind. Child- 
ren: Rebecca Ann, Wayne Michael. 

8. Earnest D. (1923 - 19Uh) - Son of Harry A. and Grace J. Hoch, Washington Twp., 
Northumberland Co., Pa. 

8. Ebert C. (I9I46 - . Son of Glen and La Moile Scheiber, Mishawaka, Ind. 

8. (Charles) Edgar (I908 - m. Hazle Irene Shoniper (I908 - 

Son of Charles Edgar and Margaret L. Keefer. Worker in Military Ordnance depot, 
Middletown, Pa. Lives in Halifax, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Children: James E. 

7. Edward (1873 - 1932) - m. Carrie Melvina Sallada (l873 - 1930) 

Son of John Adam and Elizabeth Hawk. Laborer and coal miner, Jefferson Twp., 
Dauphin Co., Pa. and other places in that vicinity. Children: William John, 
Estella May, Effie Melvina (K linger) (Andrews), Helen Viola. 

7. Edward (1879 - 

Son of William S. and Kate Brillhart. Bom in Shrewsbury, Pa. (York Co.). 
Last information - lived in 1895 with his uncle Frank E. in Darlington, Wise. 

7. Edward (1908 - I9O8) Son of Daniel W. and Elizabeth Fetterman, Washington Twp., 
Northumberland Co., Pa. 

9. Edward (1939 - m. Paz Lumayhan (cl939 - 

Son of Juan C, and Regina Limen. Zamboanga, Philippine Islands. 

9. Edward Dean (195U - • Son of Clyde E. and Jean Cleo Zimmerman, Muskegon, Mich. 

6. Edward E. (cl86l - ? ) 

Son of Henry C. (Harry) and Anna . Born in Dauphin Co., Pa. No record 

after I87O. 

7. Edward Garfield (I88I - 1952) - m. Margaret A. Taylor (I886 - 

Son of Henry and Caroline Boyer. Born in Jessup, Iowa (Buchanan Co.). Newspaper 
pressman, St. Paul and Duluth, Minn.; Milwaukee, Wise; and Chicago, 111. Died 
in Monrovia, Calif. Children: Lee Taylor. Widow lives in Monrovia, Calif. 

9. Edward George (19U2 - m. Joan Marie Bauermeister (19U2 - 

Son of Lee T. and Jenevieve Kopplekam. Corporation marketing executive, Ix>s 
Angeles, Calif. Born in Milwaukee, Wise. No children. 

6. Edward H. (I8I4J4 - ? ) - m. Emma (cl850 - ? ) 

Son of David and Dina Schneider. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Farmer 
in Washington Twp., Washington Co., Kans. May have also lived in Colo. Child- 
ren: Emma Catherine (Katie - Whestine ?), (Nevin) Harry, Edna (Moehler ?). 

6. Edward N. (l85li - 1856) Son of Benjamin and Mary Ann Enterline, Berrysburg, Pa. 

123 



PART B - REGISTER OF BQRDNKR MAI£S AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Edward Robert (1913 - 19$8) - m. Evelyn Lemoine Immel (191U - 

Son of Perry J. and Floretta Bantz. Vice Pres. of P. J. Bordner & Co., Ino* 
(food stores) and manager of one store, Massillon, Ohio (Stark Co.). Veteran 
World War II - U. S. Am^^ - Sgt. Children: Joan Lee (Dawson), Kenneth Edward. 

6. Edwin Lewis (1872 - 1962) - m. Ida Agnes Snyder (I87U - I966) 

Son of Alfred L. and Mary B. Shinew. Bom in Montgomery Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. 
Laborer and oil-driller, near Wayne, Ohio; Sedan, Kansas; Wichita, Kansas; 
Colorado Springs, Colo. Children: Cleo Lynn, Norman J., Dorothea Eleanor 
(Howard), (Maiy) Ruth (Brown), Edna Susan (Moss - Davidson), Catherine Lucille 
( Stone ) . 

7. Eldon Hubert (I892 - m. Bertha M. Hanna (I90h - 

Son of James Monroe and Emma Bachtel. Bom in Sandyville, Ohio (Tuscarawas Co.). 
Maintenance worker, Bedford and North Olmsted, Ohio and Malvern, Ark. Veteran 
World War I - Sgt. Children: Helen Mae (Holl), Mildred Kathleen (Fromant). 

6. Eli (cl8U2 - I91U) Unmarried. 

Son of Benjamin and Elizabeth . Laborer, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

5. Elias (I83U - CI836). Son of John P. and Sarah Bordner, Bethlehem Twp. , Stark 
Co., Ohio. 

5. Elias (1836- 18U8). Son of Jacob and Magdalena Wolf, Williamsville , N. Y. 

5. Elijah (I8U8 - 1920) - m. Susan Hossler (1852 - 1932) 

Son of (John) Philip and Mary Ann Guest. Farmer in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., 
and Reed Twp., Seneca Co., Ohio. Retired in Siara, Ohio. Children: Lavina 
(Hartschuh), Albert, Malinda, Roy Clayton, Elmer, Lester, Pearl (Leddick), 
Sylvester, Sarah (Heebsh), Olla (Schwab), Eli;^ah, Cornelius, Earl. 

6. Elijah Jr. (cl875 - CI878) - Son of Elijah and Susan Hossler. 

6. Elmer (I886 - 19h3) - m. Ida Hendel (l392 - 

Son of Elijah and Susan Hossler. Foreman, railroad -section gang, Attica, Ohio. 
Children: Maxine, Paul Elmer. Widow lives in Attica, Ohio (Seneca Co.). 

8. Elmer A. (1892 - 19U6) - m. Nora Beth Dulaney (l893 - 19h8) 

Son of William L. and Retta H. Reisner. Born in Independence, Iowa. County 
Auditor, Buchanan Co., Iowa. U. S. Postal Clerk, Chicago, 111, Lived in 
Wheaton, 111. Children: Robert Bruce. 

8. ELner C. (1902 - m. Alice H. Graeff (cl90U - 

Son of John W. and Mary Ann Shutt. Laborer and carpenter, I^ykens, Pa. (Dauphin 
Co.). Children. Effie Elizabeth (Keefer). 

7. Elmer Chauncey (I876 - 1953) - m. Alice Jane Rheam (l879 - 19h8) 

Son of Daniel and Amanda Rummel, originally named Chauncey Elmer. Born in Jef- 
ferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa., lived in various places in Dauphin Co. Farmer, 
laborer, and river-man. Children: Roy Edward, May Esther (Nitchman - Enterline), 
Ella Amanda (Kreitzer - Berry). 

10. Elmer Chauncey (19U9 - . Son of Roy E. Jr. and June F. Ballettee, Harrisburg,Pa. 

12U 



PARI B - REGISTEB OF BOHDN KR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Elmer Franklin (1909 - 1958) - m. (l) Esther Harvey (1910 - ; (2) Jessie VJhisen 
(Rehard) (1909 - ; (3) Frances Magdalene Johnson (cl920 - ; (U) Frances Pauline 
Todd (Blue) (1923 - . Son of Ira L. and Deborah Cagg. Bus driver and church 
custodian, Columbus, Ohio. Veteran World War II - U. S. Arnry. Children: (l) 
Edith (Roberts - Narvo - Lindell), Paul Gerald; (2) None; (3) Dan Dennis; (U) 
Jeffrey Todd, Jeane Rae. Widow married Walter W. Smith; lives in Columbus, Ohio. 

7. Elner R. (190U - m. Sevilla M. Minnier (cl907 - 

Son of David A. and Hettie A. Klinger. Laborer, Herndon, Pa. (Northumberland Co.). 
Children: None. However, alleged father of daughter. Clover Kathryn (Maurer) - 
mother, Florence Bobb. 

6. Els worth A. (l869 - 19U9) - m. (1) Elizabeth Smith (I87I - 190U)j (2) Haiy Scott 

(1862 - 1937). Son of Milo and Amelia Thayer. Raised in Flatrock Twp., Henry 
Co., Ohio. Farmer, near Corunna, Ind. County Commissioner, De Kalb Co., Auburn, 
Ind. Children: (l) Hazel (Stackhouse); (2) None. 

7. Elwood B. (1915 - m. Emily Graham (1917 - 

Son of John W. and Myrtle V. Krouse. Born in Northumberland Co., Pa. Electro- 
plater, Pennsauken, N. J. Children: Carol (Snyder), Beverly (Kurkian), Linda R., 
John E. 

8. Elwyn Roy (I883 - m. (l) Emma Christen (cl885 - ? ); (2) Vernena Ploeger( Bicker) 

(cl890 - . Son of Charles L. and Nettie E. Folgate. Factory worker, Freeport, 
111. No children. 

7. Elza Bryn (1909 - 1959) - m. Marguerite Lulu Carmane (cl9l5 - 

Son of Alpha T. and Flora Haefer. Lived in Republic and elsewhere in Seneca Co., 
Ohio. Children: Julian. Widow lives in Republic, Ohio. 

6. Elza Elmer (1875 - 1952) - m. Clara May Ziegler (1376 - 1938) 

Son of Andrew J. and Mary E. Smith. Born in Seneca Co., Ohio. Carpenter in 
Warren and Kendallville, Ind. Children: Leo Elmer, Walter Nelson, Lester J., 
Verda (Wolert), Orville E., Ora Wayne, Lucille (Freiburger), Carl. 

5. Emanuel (l829 - 1905) - m. Mary Ann Trego (1833 - I896) u ^ -, ^ p 
Son of Jonathan and Leah Kiehl. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Farmer in Union Twp., Snyder Co., Pa. Children: William Sylvester, Albaretta 
(Spangler), Mary Ann (Hoover), Samuel Trego, Isaac J., Sarah J. (Shotsberger), 
Elizabeth J. (Swartz). 

7. Emanuel Sylvester (l877 - 1919) - m. Eliza Ann Kistner (cl880 - 19l8) 

Alleged son of William Sylvester and Phoebe Sechrist. Born in Union Twp.,3nyder 
Co., Pa. Railroad man in Northumberland, Pa. Children: William Martin, Marion E., 
(Kerstetter), Ralph Sylvester, Claude M, 

7. Emerson Franklin (cl919 - m. Beatrice I. Miller (cl917 - „ ,• ^ 

Son of Frank and Maiy Alice Blett. Born in Northumberland Co., Pa. Lives m 
Buffalo, N. Y. No other information. 

8. Eric (I96U - 1965). Son of Paul D. and Mary G. R. Herb, Herndon, Pa. 

7. Ernest (1902 - ? ) . Son of Archie B. and Jennie V. Crampton. Information incom- 
plete . j^25 



PART B - REG ISTER OF BORDNER MAI£S AND TH EIR FA MILIES 

8. Ernest A. (191U - m. Alice Jane Bordner (1927 - 

Son of Samuel A. and Rosa Yerges. Daughter of Roy E. and Pauline Wike. Ernest 
born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Auto mechanic, Harrisburg, Pa. Child- 
ren: Andrea J., Dianna L., Margaret R., Kenneth K., Randolph E., John D. 

9. Ernest Edward (193U - m. ALna Jane Strohecker (1935 - 

Son of Lloyd and Daisy Billman. Farmer and machinist, near Herndon, Pa. (North- 
umberland Co.) . Children: Beverly Ann. Debra Estella, Ernest Edward, Lorraine 
Mae, Tina Marie, Tim Lee, Chris Allen, Bryian Keith. 

10. Ernest Edward Jr. (1955 - • Son of Ernest E. and Alma J. Strohecker. 

6. Ernest M. (I87O - 187_). Son of Jonathan and Mary Mace, De Kalb Co., Ind. 
Eugene (also see Gene) 

7. Eugene E. (I9II1 - m. (l) Lucille June Hart (1919 - ; (2) Mildred June Stewart 

(1917 - . Son of Ira L. and Deborah Cagg. Born in Columbus, Ohio. Sgt. Major 
U. S. kriay (including Vforld War II). Living in Alexandria, Va. Children: 
Stephen Eugene (adopted). 

6. Fielden Aaron (l879 - 1962) m. (1) Minnie Alberta Templeton (1882 - 1936); (2) 
Eva Mae Gentry (Bainer) (I886 - . Son of Joseph F. and Eugenie C. Keller. 
Born in Canton Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. Railroad man, Guthrie, Okla.; Lawrence, 
Sterling, and Wichita, Kans. Children: (1) Ruth Louella (Go ugh), Joseph Clark. 
(2) None. Widow lives in Wichita, Kans. 

6. Finley Benton (i860 - 192U) - m. Clara Jane Krisher (l360 - 193U) 

Son of Jessias and Sarah Beed. Founder of retail food stores now operated as 
P. J. Bordner 4 Co., Inc., nassillon, Ohio (Stark Co.), Children: Viola (Sohner), 
Clarence Finley, Edna Bell, Sarah Catherine, Perry Jacob, Grace I. (Lake), Maud 
Olive (Bucher), Leo Wilber, Robert Otis, 0. Verna (Hamilton). 

7. Floyd (1915 - 1937) Unmarried. 

Son of Frank W. and Marzella Amer, near Bolivar, Ohio (Tuscarawas Co.) 

8. Floyd Leroy (1933 - m. Helen Ruth Potts (193U - 

Son of WiUard G. and Beatrice Mae Haynes. Born in Montpelier, Ohio. Postal 
clerk, Jonesville, Mich. Children: Leanna Kay, Vicky Lynn, Mark David, Renee' 
De Nell. 

7. Floyd Vernon (1906 - m. Alverta Martha Marquart (1906 - 

Son of Franklin E. and Florence E. Miller. Bom in Dixon, Ohio (Van Wert Co.). 
Bus driver, Ft. Wayne, Ind. Children: Evanell Jean (Markey), James Edward. 

6. Floyd West (1885 - m. (1) Ethel Mae Worley; (2) Name unknown. 

Son of Alfred L. and Mary B. Shinew. Onetime piano-tuner; later building con- 
tractor, Prairie Depot, Ohio (Wood Co.); Toledo, Ohio; Asheville, N. C. Child- 
ren: (1) Dale Nelson; (2) None. 

8. Foster E. (1905 - 1905). Son of Jason E. and Myrtle Devies, Stark Co., Ohio. 

Francis (also see Frank) , 

126 



PART B - REGIST ER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Francis Albert (186U - 19UU) - m. Mary Weidner (l869 - 1916) 

Son of Thomas L. and Melinda Schneider. Farmer, Bethel Tvjp., Berks Co., Pa, In- 
herited homestead and part of farm originally acquired by Jacob Bordner in 1761 
from the Proprietors, Richard and Thomas Penn - - last Bordner owner. Children: 
Harry J. (who died young). 

7. Francis Calvin (1911 - m. Pauline W. Gehringer (1920 - 

Son of George C. and Mary M. Berger. Postmaster, Kutztown, Pa, (Berks Co.) 
Veteran Vforld War II - U. S. Arn^y - Capt. No children. 

8. Francis Edward (1938 - m. Rachel Ann Fairman (l9Ul - 

Son of James E. and Bernice Tolson. Born in Beloit, Wise. In U. S. Navy - Hos- 
pital corpsraan. Presently stationed at Great Lakes, 111. Lives in North Chicago. 
Children: Paul Edward, James Leo, Kenneth John. 

8. Francis William (19IO - m. Edna Van Kirk (1915 - 

Son of William E. and Anna Hahn. Born in Seneca Falls, N, Y. County maintenance 
employee, Waterloo, N. Y. (Seneca Co.). Children: William Frederick, Jill, Joy. 

8. Francis Willis (1927 - Unmarried. 

Son of Willis E. and Catherine Geraghty. Railroad electrician, Topeka, Kans. 

Frank (also see Franklin, Francis, Benjamin Franklin) 

6. Frank (Henry Franklin) (l8U5 - 191?) - m. Chestie Ann Manger (1350 - 1935) 

Son of Benjamin and Elizabeth . Laborer, Seneca Falls, N. Y. Children: 

Gertrude S. (Waldo), Jerusia, Benjamin, Arthur Chester, Ethel (Van Cleef), Anna 
E. (Rickerson). 

6. Frank (John Franklin) (l853 - ? ) - Unmarried. 

Son of Jonathan and Lucinda Bearce. Farmer, Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. 

5. Frank (cl855 - 1927) - m. Martha (Munn) (cl8U0 - 1927) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine Shutt (Miller). Hotel-keeper, saloon-keeper, and con- 
struction worker. Portage, Ohio (Wood Co.). No children. 

6. Frank (David Franklin) (l862 - 1935) - m. Elizabeth Hursey (I872 - 1953) 

Son of John Washington and Sarah E. Stigner. Farmer near Ligonier, Ind. (Noble 
Co.), Children: Hazel Marie (Blue), Iva Pearl, Klitha (Allen). 

5. Frank (Charles Franklin) (I87O - 19U9) - m. Mary Heckert (I87O - 195U) 

Son of George and Susan Phillips. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northunberland Co., 
Pa. Farmer near Hooper and Geneva, Nebr. Children: Estell^ (Brittain), George , 
Harry Mathias, Esther E, (Janing), Paul Roland. 

6. Frank (Charles Franklin) (cl871 - ? ) - "»• Minnie _ 

Son of William and Caroline Huston. Bom in Northwest Twp., Williams Co., Ohio 
and raised in Hanover Twp., Jackson Co., Mich. Farmer near Cold Springs, Mo. 
Children: Names unknown. 



127 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Frank (187I - 19h9) - m. Laura Webb (1877 - 19h8) 

Son of Daniel and Elizabeth Wilson. Born in De Witt Tvp., De Witt Co., 111. 
Laborer, Clinton and Bloomington, 111. and Lansing, Mich. Children: I^yle Webb. 

6. Frank (David Franklin) (I87U - 1931) - m. Cora S. Smeltzer (I876 - 19li2) 

Son of Levi and Mary Bright. Bom in Elkhart Co., Ind. Manager of an ice house, 
Barron Lake, Mich. Also lived in Niles, Mich. Children: William Henry, Edna 
Marie (Albright), Ila La Fern (Sherman - Quick). 

6. Frank (cl878 - 1939) - m. (1) Lucy (Lucetta) Bollinger (cl878 - ? ); (2) Mary 
Alice Blett (cl896 - I960). Son of Isaac and Harriet Reichenbach. Farmer and 
laborer, Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: (1) Mary (Reid), Florence (Brurtibach 
- Trevitz); (2) Emerson Franklin, Edna M. (Mull), Howard, Grace M. (Clark), 
Sarah Hannah (Deibler), Lloyd Lee, Benjamin, Catherine J. (Knecht), Clara, 
William J., Shirley Alice (Eiswerth), Agnes (Shultz). 

6. Frank (I888 - I89I). Son of Jerry (Jeremiah) and Sabina Hull, Wood Co., Ohio. 

9. Frank (1929 - m. (D Florence Meyer (cl929 - ; (2) Diana A. Sims (19U0 - 

Son of Roy E. and Pauline Wike. Laborer and welder, Harrisburg, Pa, In U. S. 
kriay after World War II. Children: (1) None; (2) Frank, Debbie Ann, Guy Edward. 

10. Frank Jr. (1956 - . Son of Frank and Diana A. Sims, Harrisburg, Pa. 

7. Frank Curtis (1892 - 1959) - m. Elva Witsaman (1893 - 

Son of Daniel W. and Susan Basht. Born in North Canton, Ohio. Farm manager, 
near Randolph and Strongsville, Ohio. Children: Max Witsaman. Widow lives in 
Strongsville , Ohio. 

7. Frank E. (I898 - Unmarried. 

Son of Frank Elmer and Sarah fi, Byrnes. Laborer, Darlington, Wise. 

6. Frank (Franklin) Elmer (I869 - 1925) - m. Sarah E. Byrnes (cl877 - 1930) 

Son of John and Margaret Fishel. Born in Hopewell Twp., York Co., Pa. Farmer 
and barber, Darlington and Beloit, Wise. Veteran Spanish-American War. Child- 
ren: Frank E., Arthur E., James Edward, Margaret Catherine (Fairbert - Crist). 

6. Frank (Franklin) J. (1858 - 1935) - m. Emma Ream (i860 - 1918) 

Son of Haman and Lydia Kittinger. Farmer near Canton, Ohio. Children: Niles 
Orris, Audella (Shellhouse), Vema (Whitney). 

7. Frank Lee (I88I - 1952) - m. Ina M. Atkins (I88I4 - 

Son of Alfred and Harriet G. Scrivener. Farmer in Taylor Co., Iowa, near Hop- 
kins, Mo.; Bedford, Iowa; and Gravity, Iowa. Children: Harriet Maxine, Margaret 
Ruth (Beemer). 

6. Frank (Franklin) Nelson (187O - 1955) - m. Lulu Harriet Calvin (l873 - 1959) 
Son of David M. and Mary J. Rennecker. Farmer in Flatrock Twp., Henry Co., and 
near Metamora, Fulton Co., Ohio; and near Ottawa Lake, Mich. Children :McClellan 
Nelson, Logan Clarence, Alice May (Roudebush), Virgil Franklin, Mai^ella Minnie 
(Bresnahan). 



128 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MAL ES AN D THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Frank Stanton fl880 - 196?) - m. Blanche Powell (1882 - 1961i) 

Son of Isaac J. H. and Amelia L. Wolfersberger. Born and retired in Mt. Aetna, 
Pa. (Berks Co.). Bank clerk. New York City. No children. 

6. Frank (Franklin) W. (1868 - I960) - m. Marzella Arner (I88I4 - 1928) 

Son of David F. and Susan Younkman. Fanner, Sandy Twp., Tuscarawas Co., Ohio. 
Children: Ralph Grover, Howard Franklin, Russell David, Lucille, Floyd, Warren. 

Franklin (Also see Frank) 

8. Franklin (1923 - cl925). Son of William H. and Bernice L. Brown, Niles, Mich. 

6. Franklin Earl (1879 - I960) - m. Florence Etta Miller (l88h - 19^7) 

Son of Andrew J. and Mary E. Smith. Born in Venice Twp., Seneca Co., Ohio. 
Farmer, Van Wert Co., Ohio and Allen Co., Ind. Also lived in Ft. Wayne, Ind. 
Children: Andrew Jacob, Floyd Vernon, Alma Gladys (Scott). 

7. Franklin Glen (1893 - 1961) - m. Kathleen Neiswanger (I89U - 

Son of Samuel T. and Emma Haidle. Born in Pilger, Nebr. Insurance salesman, 
Chicago, 111. and Omaha, Nebr. No children. Widow lives in Omaha, Nebr. 

Fred (also see Frederick) 

7. Fred (I883 - 1909). Son of Amos J. and Iva B. Mangold, Clinton, 111. 

7. Fred (Frederick) Daniel (l882 - 19^1) - m. Lillian Schlamp (1887 - 196U) 

Son of Daniel K. and Sarah M. Geyer. Born in Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
Laborer and carpenter, Freeport, 111. Children: Ptyllis, Norma (Bushong). 

9. Frederick Arnold (19^6 - . Son of Thomas W. and Marguerite L. Pavonarius, 

Toledo, Ohio. 

5. Frederick Milton (1857 - 193?) - m. Matilda Susanna McCurtain (1856 - 1916) 

Son of Peter and Anna Maria Hepner. Carpenter and butcher, Lower Mahanoy Twp., 
Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: William Henry, Clara Annie (Propst), Katy 
Malvena, Sarah Agnes (Sanders), George, Albert M., John Franklin, Maiy Ellen 
(Farnsworth - Bordner), Clarence Augusta, Martha Alberta (Bardall - Radel), 
Polly Hannah Evaline (Hassinger). 

9. Freeman E, (1918 - 19U5). Son of Earl G. and Susanna Zimmerman, Millersburg, Pa. 
Killed in World War II - U. S. Anrry, 10th Armored Div. 

6. Fremont Charles (l857 - 1916) - m. (l) Name unknown; (2) Helene Kruse (cl872 - 

1921). Son of John and Catharine Miller. Born in East Hanover Twp., Dauphin Co., 
Pa. Carpenter in Dauphin Co., Pa. and San Francisco, Calif. Children: (1) Bart, 
another son, name unknown; (2) Helene Kruse (Haselhurst - Harton - Pohlman), 
Fremont Roosevelt, David Stirewalt, Dorothy Virginia (Smith). 

7. Fremont Roosevelt (1903 - m. Alice Lofgren (1903 - 

Son of Fremont C. and Helene Kruse. Accountant, American President Lines, San 
Francisco, Calif. Lives in Oakland, Calif. Children: Robert F., P^llis 
(Cant well). 

129 



PART B - REGISTER OF BO RDNER MALES AND TliEIR FAMILIES 

5. Fremont W. (1877 - 19U6) - m. Emina M. Held (l88li - 

Son of John P. and Sophia Weiteman. Bom in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. Painting 
contractor, Canton, Ohio. Children: Harlon John, Myrtle M. (Arter), Ada Ellen 
(Kauffman - Gerber). Widow lives in Strasburg, Ohio. 

8. Galen Eugene (1935 - m. Marcella J. Wagner (cl935 - 

Son of George N. and Helen Mae Kratzer. Telephone-company employee, Selinsgrove, ; 
Pa. (Snyder Co.) Children: Donna June, Keith Allen. 

9. Gary Alan (1953 - . Son of Ralph W. and Carol I. Feuser, East Moline, 111. 

8. Gary Lee ( 19314 - m. Cynthia Jean Sharp (1937 - 

Son of John B. and Elma Bothomley. Raised in Burr Oak, Mich. Chemical and atomic 
engineer, Hartford, Conn. Lives in Glastonbury, Conn. Children: Andrew James, 
John Charles. 

9. Gary Lee (1953 - . Son of Winfred P. and Katherine E. Dudtenhoefer, Decatur, 111. 

10. Gary Ray (1958 - . Son of Paul L. and Jane I. Paul, Janesville, Wise. 

10. Gary Raymond (1952 - . Son of Raymond G. and Nancy L. Immegart, Crittenden, N. Y. 
9. Gary Wayne (cl950 - . Son of Carl J. and Gladys Carpenter, Battle Creek, Mich. 

6. Geary (1866 - 1930) - m. Gertrude Wise (cl870 - 19U5) 

Son of Godfrey and Leah ^iehl. Born in Tulpehocken Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Butcher 
and meat-cutter, Hazelton, Pa. (Luzerne Co.) Children: Nathaniel Mark, Clayton 
(both adopted) . 

Gene (also see Eugene) 

8. Gene Ellsworth (1939 - m. Joyce Marlene Miller (19U3 - 

Son of Glenn A. and Irene M. Click. Born in Seneca Co., Ohio. Factory worker, 
Bucyrus, Ohio (Crawford Co.) Children: Vicki Michele. 

8. Gene Herbert (1935 - m. Florence Arlene Shipe (cl935 - 

Son of Herbert 0. and Lena L. Snyder. Construction worker, near Shamokin, Pa, 
(Northumberland Co.) Children: Terry Gene. 

3. George (I763 - cl8U5) - m, (l ?) Catharine Clare (1771 - I836); (2) Rosanna 

(Zerby or Zerbe ?) (cl765 - cl8U5). Son of Philip Bortner and Maria Elisabetha 
Velt. Sometimes erroneously called "Bordner". Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., 
Pa. Farmer in Pine Grove Twp., Berks Co. (now in Schuylkill Co.) and Hempfield 
Twp., Westmoreland Co., Pa., and in Canton Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. No children. 

U. George (1795 - I867) - m. Catharine Caninger (1798 - 1377) 

Son of Henry and Susanna Alburt. Bom in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Farmer in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio and in Berlin Twp., Knox Co.; Chatfield 
Twp., Crawford Co.; and Superior Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. Children: John, 
Henry, Margaret (Hillard or Nye), Josiah (Cyrus), Nancy A. (Bowser), George. 

130 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. George (l80h - 1882) - m. Wilhelmina Klein (I8O8 - I88I) 

Son of Jacob Bortner (Bordner) and Elizabeth . Born in Beaver Tvjp., North- 
umberland Co., Pa. (part later in Union Co. and now in Snyder Co.). Farmer, in 
Beaver Twp., Union Co., Pa.; in Town of Fayette, Seneca Co., N.Y.; and in Buckeye 
Twp. (part later in Dakota Twp.), Stephenson Co., 111. (Also a cooper.) Children: 
David, Lydia (Snook), Daniel Kline, Jacob K. (Kline ?), Julia A. (Hoofnagle), 
Eliza Ann (Klopp), Priscilla, Charles B., Frances (Kuntz), Sophronia (Hess), James. 

6. George (182U - 1911) - m. Lovina Roush (I83I - 1908) 

Son of Jacob and Hannah . Born in Beaver Twp., Union Co., Pa. (now in 

Snyder Co.). Farmer in Centre Co., Pa. and Buckeye Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
Livery operator and coal dealer in Freeport, 111.; also in grain business. Children; 
Minerva Alice (Ascher), Lawson, Mary Etta (Coons), Delia (Breon), lyma (Ruston), 
Rosetta, Amanda, and one other who died young, name unknown. 

U. George (1821; - 1897) - m. Susanna (Susan) Phillips (l827 - 1892) 

Son of Balthaser and Magdalena Emerich. Tailor and farmer in Lower Mahanoy Twp., 
Northumberland Co., Pa. Went West twice, but returned each time. Children: 
Sarah Adelia (Klock), Henry Milton, Mary Ellen (Kline), Jeremiah C, (Lucius) 
Oliver, Isaac Elmer, Elizabeth C. (Phillips), Charles Franklin (Frank), 

5. George (l825 - 1903) - m. Catharine Phillips (1825 - I896) 

Son of Jacob and Magdalena Wolf. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Stonemason in Williams ville, N.T. and Burr Oak, Mich. Children: Lucius 
Albert, William Henry, Charles A., Hattie C. 

5. George (cl83U - ? ) - m. Emeline Van Buskirk (cl8Ul - ? ) 

Son of George and Catharine Caninger. Born in Berlin Twp., Knox Co. or Chatfield 
Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. Farmer in Superior Twp., Williams Coo, Ohio. Children: 
Adessa, possibly others (names unknown). 

6. George (18^9 - 1929) - m. Minnie Hummel (I866 - 1956) 

Son of Moses and Maria A, Bearce. Farmer in Lewistown Twp,, Fulton Co., 111. 
Children: Cora Maria (Eveland), Mecia, Scott, Nellie Dean (Miles), Kathryn 
(Tanner), Louise (Holmes). 

6. George (1873 - 19U5) - m. Nellie Levers (l877 - 1959) 

Son of Jeremiah (Jerry) and Sabina Hull. Farmer in Liberty Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. 
Children: Hazel, Lucia (Maidment), Harold F. 

7. George (cl880 - 7 ) - m. Name unknown 

Son of Lewis and . Believed to have lived near Joplin, Mo. 

No knovm children. 

6. George (1885 - I886). Son of Frederick M. and Matilda McCurtain, Northumber.Co.,Pa. 

6. George (l893 - m. Pauline Matejka (cl895 - 

Son of Charles Franklin (Frank) and Mary Heckert. Farmer near Geneva, Nebr. 
Children: Eileen (Dubois), Gladys (Shrader). 

6. George (I893 - cl89U). Son of Isaac E. and Anna Anderson, Riverside, Pa. 

131 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAM I LIES 
7. George (I89U - I898). Son of Charles L. and Annie Hartman, Schaefferstown, Pa. 

7. George (1897 - ? )• Son of James and Mary , Porter, Pa. (Schuylkill Co.). 

No more information. 

6. George Albert (cl887 - cl930) Unmarried 

Son of Jessie and Mary A. Burk. Definance, Ohio. Veteran World War I. 

10. George Allen (19^2 - cl953). Son of (Earl) Lee and Ruth B. Helle, Smithfield,Ill. 

9. George Arthur (1953 - • Son of Maurice and Loretta Brenneman, Canton, 111. 

6. George Calvin (I87O - 1930) - m. Mary Madeline Berger (cl880 - 19U7) 

Son of Thomas L. and Melinda Schneider. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
Teacher in public schools in Berics Co., Pa. and later Professor of Mathematics, 
Pennsylvania Normal College, Kutztown, Pa. (Berks Co.). Children: Paul Berger, 
Claude Levi, Grayce A. (Heffner), Mary (Herren), Richard Thomas, Francis Calvin, 
Ruth (Helms), George Wilson, Ralph Burton, Elizabeth Jane. 

8. George Carpenter (1929 - m. (l) Patricia Lou Ervan (1932 - ; (2) Barbara Krnach 

(I9UI - . Son of James S. and Florence Carpenter. Foreman, Hoover Company, 
North Canton, Ohio. Veteran of Korean War - U. S. Army. Children: (l) Scott 
Stephen; (2) None. 

8. George Donald (1912 - 1965) - m. Florence M. Cook (1916 - 

Son of Oren E. and Olive E. Mosher. Born in North Canton, Ohio. Steel-mill em- 
ployee, Warren, Ohio. Children: Shirley Ann (Bailey), Donald George, Nancy 
June (Gentry), Gwendolyn Rae, Jocelyn Mae, Widow lives in Warren, Ohio. 

6. George E. (18^9 - 1930) - m. Nettie Breed (cl860 - ? ) 

Son of Augustus and Catherine Lavin. Born in Burr Oak, Mich. Jeweler in Mason, 
Mich. Children: Lennagene (Swearengin). 

6. George Emanuel (I88I - 1926) - m. Edna Mat Stutsman (I88U - 

Son of John and Catherine A. Dohmer. Born in York Twp., Elkhart Co., Ind. Farm- 
er in York Twp., Elkhart Co., Ind.; near Union, Mich. (Cass Co.); and Town of 
Conrath, Rusk Co., Wise. Children: Russell Lavern, Kenneth Leroy, Charles Dewey, 
Ma^el Eileen (Thorson). Widow lives in IcJhite Bear Lake, Minn. 

8. George Engert (1939 - m. Maryann Schmidt (cl9l;0 - 

Son of Kenneth L. and Agnes R. Thormodsgard. President, Development Research 
Corporation (land research), Minneapolis, Minn. No children. 

6. George F. (18^8 - 1937) - m. (l) Lillie ( ? - 1927); (2) Agnes 



( ? - 1939). Son of Benjamin and Mary Ann Enterline. Born in Berrysburg, Pa. 
(Dauphin Co.) Hotel-proprietor and farmer, Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Later, bartender, Harrisburg, Pa. Alleged father of Walter A. Bordner - mother, 
Albaretta Heckert. No other children. 



132 



PAR T B - REGIST ER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FMILIKS 

7. George H. (1886 - 19U8) - m. Lydia Alberta Snyser (1886 - I960) 

Son of Jerome M. and Mary A. Horstick. Born in Paln^rra, Pa. Dentist, York, Pa, 
No children. 

8. George Harvey (191U - m. Eleanor Mae Wilhelm (1922 - 

Son of (Milton) Miles and Dora A, Kline. Factory employee, Bethel, Pa. (Berks Co.) 
Children: Judy D., Timothy G. 

6. George Henrj- (1865 - 190?) - m. Alta Eiiina Cullen, M. D. (I87U - 19U7) 

Son of Henry H. and Catherine Metzger. Born in Burr Oak, Mich.; raised in Onawa, 
Iowa. Insurance agent, Comanche, Okla. Children: George Henry. 

8. George Henry (1901 - 1902). Son of Addison and Rebecca Shaeffer, Lebanon, Pa. 

7. George Henry Jr. (1907 - ni. Frances Margaret Morse (I906 - 

Son of George H. and Alta E. Cullen. Radio service man, Duncan, Okla. No children. 

7. George I. (I88I1 - 19U2) Unmarried. 

Son of David H. and Lydia A. Bonawitz . Lived in Colfax Twp., Huron Co., Mich. 
Tugboat captain in Cleveland, Ohio at one time. 

6. George Irvin (181^8 - 1395) - m. Emma Louisa Johnson (I857 - I89I) 

Son of John and Rachael Ramberger. Born in Mifflin or Upper Paxton Twp., Dauphin 
Co., Pa. Farmer and school-teacher in Council Grove, Kans. Children: Willis Ed- 
gar, Alma Eugenia (Black), Ona Myrtle (Roll), Otis Milton, Carrie Ray (Rathbone), 
Jessie Benton (Bruton). 

8. George Kneal (190U - 19U6) - m. (1) Stella Marie Ellis (1901 - 1928); (2) Esta 

Dema Parlette (1900 - . Son of Roy J. and Margaret England. Born in Brookston, 
Ind. (White Co.). Telephone lineman, Kokomo, I^rion, and Ft. Wayne, Ind. Child- 
ren: (1) Margaret Ellen (Scott), Jack Edward; (2) Martha Sue(Bitter). Widow 
lives in Evansville, Ind. 

7. George Lester (I9l8 - 1919) Son of Benjamin and Catharine Keiser, Northumberland 

County, Pa . 

6. George N. (cl880 - cl890) Son of Henry M. and Sarah Seller, Northumberland Co., Pa. 

7. George Nelson (1909 - m. Helen Mae Kratzer (1909 - 

Son of Charles N. and Daisy Mae Ziegler. Laborer, Mt. Pleasant Mills, Pa. (Snyder 
Co.). Also lived in Freeburg, Paxtonville, and Middleburg, Pa. Children: Leonard 
Ardell, Virginia Mae (Boyer), Galen Eugene, George Nelson, Lee Charles, Twila 
Larraine, Leroy Ernest. 

8. George Nelson Jr. (1937 - m. Shelby Jean Graybill (1937 - 

Son of George N. and Helen M. Kratzer. Born in Mt. Pleasant Mills, Pa. Dye-house 
worker, near Richfield, Pa. (Snyder Co.). Children: Stephen William. 

7. George Peter (1908 - m. Eleanor M. Lavin (1911 - 

Son of John H. and Emma Deck. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Mail-carrier 
and postal clerk, Kutztown, Pa. (Berks Co.). Children: John G. 

133 



PART B - RE GI STER OF BORDNER MALES AND TH EIR FAMILIES 

7. George Robert (l899 - m. (l) Orpha M. De Long (Powers) (cl390 - ; (2) Clara M. 
Erdman (1888 - 1961); (3) Ethel Kniley (Karteman) (1901 - . Son of Richard R. 
and Lillie L. Burd. Born in Northumberland, Pa. Laborer and auto mechanic, in 
Philadelphia, Pa. No children. 

7. George Selwyn (I898 - ra. Nell Mathilda Hurrel (I898 - 

Son of Charles S. and Ruth L. Brassbridge. Born in Circleville, Kans. General 
contractor, Kansas City, Mo. Veteran World War I - U. S. Arny (Musician). Child- 
ren: Charles Selwyn II, Frances Charlene (Tompkins), Robert Hurrel. 

8. George Tanner (1925 - m. (l) Mc Kenna (cl925 - ; (2) Mary Louise Rees 

(Freeman) (1928 - . Son of Scott and Ethel Tanner. Bank teller, Lewistowi, 111. 
Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: (l)Carol Beth, David Scott, Steven 
Patrick; (2) Patricia Kathleen. 

7. George W. (I89I - 1907). Son of Jacob and Sarah Matter, Jefferson Twp., Dauphin 
Co., Pa. 

5. George Washington (I826 - 1919) - m. (1) Mary Ann (Polly) Bolender (l835 - i860)- 

(2) Catharine Bolender (1822 - I888); (3) Emma Brant (1855 - 19U3). Son of 
(George) Peter and Christiana Losh. Born in Hopewell Twp., Licking Co., Ohio. 
Farmer and stock-raiser, Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Children: (l) (Francis) 
Marion, Sarah, Henry Peter; (2) None; (3) Irma (Campbell), Velma (Fouts). I 

6. George Washington (1861; - I867). Son of William and Sarah A. Snyder, Whitley Co., •-* 

Ind. 

7. George Washington (I908 - Unmarried. 

Son of Noah B. and Dora E. King. Trucker, Holgate, Ohio (Henry Co.). Veteran 
World War II - U. S, Arity. 

7. George Webster (1901 - m. Gladys l^att (1902 - 

Son of Charles A. and Bosa B. Meglasson. Born in Stephenville, Tex. Hospital em- 
ployee. Ft. Worth, Tex. Children: Marvin Glen. 

7. George William (1907 - m. Vivian Hoffman (1908 - 1963) 

Son of Johnson Per Lee and Jane 0. Stokes. Warehouse foreman. Canton, Ohio. Vet- 
eran World War II - U. S. Army. Children: George William. 

7. George William (1919 - m. Mary Katharine Eborg (1922 - 

Son of Vernon E. and Cleo M. Collins. Barber and farm operator, near Green Springs, 
Ohio (Sandusky Co.). Born in Seneca or Lucas Co., Ohio. Veteran World War II - 
U. S. Navy. Children: Marilyn Jane (Olesen), Carols May (Bolander), Robert George, 
Maureen Kay, Michael Alvin, William Allen. 

9. George William (1931 - m. Jane Teresa Venditti (1933 - 

Son of Wilson and Aria I. Nehrboss. Born in Crittenden, N. Y. Electronics engin- 
eer, Williamsville, N. Y. Children: Faye Ann, Catherine Marie, George Wilson, 
Barbara Jane. 

8. George William Jr. (1932 - m. Lucille Vernier (1933 - 

Son of George W. and Vivian Hoffman. Building contractor, Louisville, Ohio (Stark 
Co.). Children: Ronald Deane, Randy Dale, 

13U 

t' 



PART_B ^_^GISm _0F BORDN ER MALES AND T HEIR FAMILIES 

7. George Wilson (I9l8 - m. Reba Jane Basom (1921 - 

Son of George G. and Mary M. Berger. Born in Kutztown, Pa. (Berks Co.). Ass't. 
librarian, Pennsylvania State Library, Harrisburg, Pa. Lives in Camp Hill, Pa. 
Veteran World War II - U. S. Arny. Children: Georgianne Marie, Steven Edward, 
Jennifer Ruth. 

10. George Wilson (1962 - 1962). Son of George W. and Jane T. Venditti, Williams- 
ville, N. Y. 

7. Gerald (I898 - m. Viola Thome (1903 - 

Son of Noah B. and Dora E. King. Bom in New Bavaria, Ohio (Henry Co.). Station- 
ary engineer. Napoleon, Ohio. No children. 

9. Gerald B. (1929 - Unmarried. 

Son of Herbert C. and Florence E. Klopp. Born in Berks Co., Pa. Lives in or near 
Taneytown, Md. 

9. Gerald Clarence (1963 - . Son of Gerald H. and Harvena H. Nestler, Paxtang, Pa. 

8. Gerald Dale (193U - Unmarried. 

Son of Clyde E. and Emily C. Mettie. Born in Toledo, Ohio. In U. S. Coast Guard, 
presently on duty in Portland, Ore. 

8. Gerald Harvey (1915 - m. Harvena Rose Nestler (19U7 - 

Son of Harvey F. and Sarah J. Behrens. Steel-mill worker, near Harrisburg, Pa, 
Lives in Paxtang, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Veteran Vforld War II and Korean War. Child- 
ren: Gerald Clarence. 

8. Gerald Wayne (1921 - m. Glenda Taylor (1923 - 1956) 

Son of Amza L. and Flossie E. Kaufman. Born in Gallon, Ohio (Crawford Co.). 
Traveling salesman for a music publishing house. Presently lives in Plymouth, Ind. 
Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy (Musician). Children: Bridget. 

7. Glen (cl890 - 19U0) - m. Ruth Hamilton (cl900 - 

Son of Oscar E. and Ada L. Cooper. Born in Fulton Co., 111. Beer-truck driver, 
Burlington, Wash. No children. Widow married, now Mrs. Gene Jones, Puyallup,Wash. 

7. Glen (l897 - m. La Moile Scheiber (cl900 - 

Son of Otis E. and Margaret B, Van Coyte. Born in Silver Lake, Ind. Foundry- 
molder, Mishawaka, Ind. Children: Virgil Hugh, Caroline Joan (Smith), Dorothy 
La Rue (Balish), James Frederick, Be mice Margaret Belle (Chadwell), Paul John, 
Dennis N., Thomas Otto, Ebert C, Linda Sue, Anna Marie, David Lee. 

8. Glen W. (1921 - m. Juliana Nancy Bane (1921 - 

Son of Leo and Ruth Prange. Lawyer, Ft. Wayne, Ind. Veteran World War II - U. S. 
Air Corps - Sgt. Children: David Leonard, William Alan, Kevin Bane. 

7. Glenn Allen (1910 - m. Irene Mary Glick (1912 - 

Son of Vernon E. and Cleo M. Collins. Bom in Tiffin, Ohio. Farmer and carpenter, 
near Sycamore, Ohio (Wyandot Co.). Also lived near Green Springs and Clyde, Ohio. 
Children: Avonelle Vonetta (Spiegel - Andrews), Annabelle Viola (Stinehelfer), 
Joan Marlene (Dunn), Gene Ellsworth. 

135 



1 

f 

! 

I 

ii 



I 



PARI B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Glenn Allen (19U0 - m. Betty Mae Martz (cl9U5 - 

Son of Cloyd A. and Verna I. Latsha. Born in Washington Twp, Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Employee of Naval Supply Depot, Mechanicsburg, Pa. (Cumberland Co.). No 
children. 

8. Glenn Willard (l9Ul - . Son of Donald W. and Esther G. Gilbert, Burlington, Wash. 

U. Godfrey (cl790 - cl8U0) - m. Sarah Gasser (Gassert ?) (cl790 - 7 ) 

Son of Daniel and Eva (Knaeves ? ). Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Master 
joiner and teamster. Lived in Bethel Tvp. , Berks Co. and nearby in Lebanon Co. 
Died of fever on a trip as teamster between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. Child- 
ren: Daniel, Charles, Catharine, John, Godfrey, Sarah (Rhineo ?), Jacob, William. 

5. Godfrey (l8l9 - 1895) - m. Leah Riehl (l825 - 186?) 

Son of Godfrey and Sarah Gasser. Farmer and drover, Tulpehocken Twp., Berks Co., 
Pa. Also lived in Lebanon Co. Children: Ruallen, Adeline (Barnett), Emma (Price), 
Dina (Scholl), Cassandra (Frantz), Henrietta (Etta - Wissinger), Amelia, Wil- 
liam Adam, Geary. 

7. Grant (1862 - 1907) - m. Annie Valeria Sherk (cl863 - ? ) 

Son of Daniel T. and Sarah Weaber. Born in Union Twp., Lebanon Co., Pa. Farmer 
in Swatara Twp., Lebanon Co. Children: Annie Valeria (Miller - Brewer), (Sarah) 
Margaret (Binkley - Wry), Samuel Dawson, Edith Irene, Esther Ida. 

7. Graydon Spillette (1905 - m. Velma Elizabeth Harrer (1907 - 

Son of Daniel E. and Mearle Spillette. Joint owner, with son. The Herald Print- 
ing Co., New Washington, Ohio (publishes weekly newspaper and provides printing 
services) Children: Robert Leroy. 

9. (Truman) Greg (19U7 - . Son of Charles W. and Emma L. Fam.brough, Brewster, Wash. 

9. Greg W. (1951 - . Son of Recil J. and Donna V. Lesnet, Colon, Mich. (St. Joseph Co.); 

10. Gregg Stuart (I96I - . Son of Paul L. and Jane I. Paul, Janesville, Wise. 

9. Gregory Allen (19U8 - . Son of Charles H. and Esther A. Carl, Huntington, Ind. 
9. Gregory Lee (I9ii8 - . Son of Robert H. and Bonnie L. Johnson, Raytown, Ifo. 

9. Gregory S. (1959 - . Son of James E. and Sue A. Buckley, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

10. Gregory Wilson (1959 - . Son of Raymond G. and Nancy I. Iramegart, Crittenden, N.Y. 
10. Greig Alan (1959 - . Son of Larry E. and Rita J. Reibold, Salina, Kans. 

Gus (also see Augustus) 

7. Gus W. (1925 - m. Alma Barran (cl925 - 

Son of Jay and Gladys Crosby. Born in East Waterloo, la. Telephone-company sup- 
ervisor, Denver, Colo. Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: Deborah K., 
Michael William, Janice, Gus W. 

8. Gus W. Jr. (i960 - . Son of Gus W. and Alma Barran, Denver, Colo. 

136 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDMR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. (Evan) Guy (l885 - m. Jayne Belle Farnham (l88U - 

Son of William S. and Polly Ann Hoch. Born in Nickerson, Nebr. Accountant in 
lumber and grain concerns and manager of branch retail lumber yards, Stanton 
and Grand Island, Nebr., and Dunsmuir and Long Beach, Calif. Now lives in Long 
Beach. No children. 

7. Cuy (1899 - m. (l) Ellen Dates (1897 - ; (?) Grace Black (cl900 - 

Son of Otis E. and Margaret B. Van Coyte. Born in Silver Spring, Ind. Laboratory 
technician, testing materials, Mishawaka, Ind. Children: (l) Pauline Bora (Sand- 
ers - Peffley), Elsie Renee (Black), Ronald Dean; (?) None. 

6. Guy Dunlap (I876 - 19hl) - m. Vinnie Mable Foodman (I876 - I963) 

Son of Benjamin F. and Kary Dunlap. Bank cashier, Burr Oak, Mich. Children: 
Hovard Woodman, Dorothy (Holmes), John Benjamin. 

10. Guy Edward (1959 - . Son of Frank and Diana A. Sims, Harrisburg, Pa. 

8. Guy Karl (1915^ - m. Elsie Marie Forbes (I9l6 - 

Son of Guy K. and Effie I. Boiling. Vice Pres. Penrod, Jurden, Clark Co., 
Norfolk, Va. Also lived in Indianapolis, Ind. and York, Pa. Children: Betty 
Agnes, Jam.es Kelley. 

7. Guy Kelley (I88? - m. Effie Irene Boiling (I888 - I96I) 

Son of Israel (Isaac) J. and Nancy M. Cook. Born in Brookston, Ind. Shipping 
clerk, Indianapolis, and Ladoga, Ind. and Norfolk, Va. Childi'en: Guy Karl, 

8. Guy Martin (19?7 - m. Cora Ilene Beadles (cl930 - 

Son of Dayton A. and Telsa K. Taylor. Born in Lewistown, 111. (Fulton Co.). 
Railroad brakeman, East Peoria, 111. Children: Pamela Sue, Craig Martin. 

8. Guy William (19?3 - m. Jean Gertrude Yohe (19?9 - 

Son of Herbert 0. and Lena L. Snyder. Farmer, near Dornsife, Pa. (Northumber- 
land Co.). Children: Donald Guy, Diane Elaine, Sheri Ann. 

$. Haman (l8?9 - 1903) - m. Lydia Kittinger (I83? - 1911) 

Son of John P. and Sarah Bordner. Farmer, Canton and Perry Townships, Stark Co., 
Ohio. Children: Samantha Jane (Clay), Franklin J. (Frank). 

6. Harlon John (1905 - 1958) - m. (l) Dolly Broadwater (1910 - ; (2) Vilma Albrecht 

(1911 - . Son of Fremont l.'. and Emma Held. Operated a watch-repair business, 
Canton, Ohio. Children: (l) Colleen (Morocco); (?) None. Widow remarried - 
now Mrs. Vincent Sencuck, Canton, Ohio. 

7. Harold (I898 - m. Arietta Frances Deibert (1911 - 

Son of William C. and Christina Chester. Born in Berrysburg, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 
Automobile mechanic, Williamstown, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). No children. 

8. Harold (1915 - 1915). Son of Clarence F. and Amelia Greenwalt, Massillon, Ohio. 

9. Harold (cl9hO - . Son of John C. and Rummel, Millersburg, Pa. 

137 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THKIR FAMILIES 

8. Harold Boyd (1923 - m. Lois A. Birmingham (1928 - 

Son of William B. and Olive Fae Mayfield. Born in Grand Island, Nebr. Con- 
struction engineer, Canoga Park, Calif. Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Coirps 
- Corp. Children: Kathleen, Karen, Robert William. 

8. Harold Clayton (1911 - 1920). Son of Otis M. and Levetah L.Shaw, Kansas City, Kans. 

8. Harold Clyde (1925 - m. Marjorie Keister (1928 - 

Son of Raymond E. and Ina Strayer. Farmer in Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
Veteran World War II - U. S. Amy - Sgt. Children: Pamela Jo, Patricia Ann, 
James Steven, David Alan. 

8. Harold E. (1920 - ra. Dorothy N. Rothenberger (1921 - 

Son of Paul C. and Minnie Mengel. Bom in Rehrersburg, Pa. Machinist, Tenple, 
Pa. (Berks Co.). Veteran World War II and Korean War - U. S. Navy. Cliildren: 
Janice M., Harold R. 

8. Harold E. (19U8 - . Son of Paul D. and Mary C.R. Herb, Herndon, Pa. 

8. Harold Edward (1932 - m. Patricia Mary Huston (1933 - 

Son of Dayton A. and Telsa K. Taylor. Bom in Lewistown, 111. (Fulton Co.). 
Engine-tester, Caterpillar Tractor Co., Farmington, 111. Also lived in Peoria 
and Galesburg, 111. Previously in U. 3. krmy - Corp. Children; Steven Ray, 
Sheryl I^ynn, Shirley Jean. 

7. Harold F. (1905 - m. Ivalou Glaser (1911 - 

Son of George and Nellie Levers. Farmer, near Weston, Ohio (Wood Co.). Veter- 
an World War II - U. S, Navy. Aviator. No children. 

7. Harold Keith (1919 - m. June Marie Hartman (l92li - 

Son of Oscar F. and ^Ivia A. Dugan. Born in Hugo, Okla . Fireman, Los Angeles, 
Calif. Lives in Lakeview Terrace. Veteran World War II - U, S. Navy - Chief 
Petty Officer. Children: Diane Marie, Linda Lee, Jill Antoinette. 

7. Harold P. (1903 - m. Harriet Luella McClain (190U - 

Son of Arthur U. and Belle Parks. Factory worker. Canton, Ohio (Stark Co.). 
Children; Marybelle (Ostrander - Todd), William Harold, Sally Lou (Lessig), 
David Arthur, Cheryl Lynn (Wilson). 

9. Harold R. (1950 - . Son of Harold E. and Dorothy N. Rothenberger, Temple, Pa. 

7. Harris C. (1879 - 1959) - m. (l) Edith E. Sheaffer (l882 - ; (2) Jessie V. 

Foreman (1887 - . Son of John W. and Mary C. Bowers. Bom in Jackson Twp., 
Dauphin Co., Pa. Railroad brakeman, Millersburg, Pa. No children. 

8. Harrison (Harry) Edward (1936 - m. Nancy Lee Grubbs (1938 - 

Son of Howard W. and Bessie M. Farnsworth. Born in Bvanston, 111. Property- 
insurance underwriter, Washington, D. C. Lives in Kenilworth, M. Also lived 
in Louisville, Ky. and Philadelphia, Pa. No children. 

Harry (also see Harrison, Henry, William Henry Harrison) 

138 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Harry (Henry Harrison) (1865 - 1937) - m. Caroline Parfait (also known as 

Phillips) (1875 - 1923). Parents unknown. Possible father - (William) Henry 
Harrison (I8UI - 1907). Bom in Dauphin Co., Pa. Laborer, Jackson Twp., Dauphin 
Co. and Mahanoy City, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and in Waterbury, Conn. Children: 
Anna (Zedlita), William E., Carrie (Sno-w), Marion (Smith), Helen (Walder), Harry, 
Raymond D. 

7. (Nevin) Harzy (1875 - cl890). Son of Edward H. and Bnma , Washington Co., Kans. 

7. Harry (I88O - I88O). Son of Isaac J.H. and Amelia L. Wolfersberger, Mt. Aetna, Pa. 

7. Harry (1892 - 1911). Son of John H. and Emma M. Deck, Kutztown, Pa. 

8. Harry (1895 - ? ). Unmarried 

Son of Harry (Heniy Harrison) and Caroline Parfait. Born in Mahanoy City, Pa. 
(Schuylkill Co.). Entertainer, Waterbury, Conn. 

7. Harry (1897 - . Unmarried. 

Son of Noah B. and Dora E. King, Holgate, Ohio (Henry Co.). 

7. Harry (1902 - 1903). Son of Oscar F. and ^Ivia A. Dugan, Daugherty, Iowa. 

7. Harry A. (I898 - 195U) - m. Grace J. Hoch (1893 - 

Son of Daniel W. and Elizabeth Fetterraan. Farmer, Washington Twp., Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. Children: Cloyd A., Norman Levi, Earnest D., Raymond Bruce. 

7. Harry Adam (I88U - 1952) - m. Laura M. Moyer (cl883 - 1935) 

Son of Jacob M. and Ellen Hain. Bom in Bernville, Pa. Railroad-station agent, 
Robesonia, Pa. (Berks Co.). No children. 

9. Harry Ammon (1921 - m. Mary W. Matthews (cl925 - 

Son of Ammon and Helen Warner. Born in Lykens, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Refrigeration 
mechanic, Camden, N.J. Veteran World War II - U.S. Army - Sgt. Children: Mary. 

6. Harry (Harrison) Andrew (I87O - 1952) - m. Sarah Itevert (I868 - 1930) 

Son of Samuel and Leanna Stout. Farmer, near Attica, Ohio (Seneca or Huron Co.) 
Children: Clayton Delbert, Edna (Miller), Mable (Hansen), Walter Andrew. 

5. Harry (Henry) C. (I836 - 1892) - m. (1) Anna (I838 - 1875); (2) Emma 

(Woods) (cl859 - cl935). Son of Michael and Catharine Koppenhef f er . Born in 
Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Coach- trimmer, Millersburg (Dauphin Co.), Lewis- 
town (Mifflin Co.), and Newport (Perry Co.), Pa. Lived in Qiicago, 111. in last 
years. Civil War veteran - Sgt. Co. I, 177th Pa. Inf. Children: (l) Edward E., 
Mary; (2) Oscar Foster, Jay. Widow also lived in Waterloo, Iowa. 

6. Harry Cecil (I889 - 1959) - m. (l) Nona Honsberger (I889 - 1929); (2) Hazel L. 

Seiger (1895 - . Adopted son of Levi and Mary Jane Waller. Factory foreman. 
Tiffin, Ohio (Seneca Co.) Children: (l) Charles Albert, Russell Clyde; (2) 
Carolyn Mae. Widow lives in Tiffin, Ohio. 

7. harry Curtis (1900 - m. Jeanette Clem Crisler (Putnam) (1901 - 

Son of Milo S. and Clara M. Jenkins. Born in Clinton, 111. Machinist, San Diego, 
Calif. Served many years in U. S. Navy, including both World Wars. Children: 
Harry Jay. 

139 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES ANH THEIR FAMILI ES 

6. Hariy D. (1866 - 19hO) - Unmarried. 

Son of Jonathan and Mary (Sadie) Mace. Railroad engineer (Wabash R. R.), Butler, i 
Ind. (De Kalb Co.). Lived last years in Ironton, Mo. 

7. Harry (Henry) Daniel (l868 - 19U3) - m. Alice M. Etschberger (I87O - 1900) 

Son of Daniel J. K. and Rufina Lerch. Born in Bethel Tvp., Berks Co., Pa. 

Laborer, Hebron (Lebanon Co.) and Sinking Spring (Berks Co.), Pa. Children? 

Mabel Mary, Augusta Florence (De Turk), Mark Ezra. 1 

7. Harry (Henry) Davison (I869 - 1906) - m. Annie M. Oberholtzer (I876 - 1956) 

Son of Daniel T. and Sarah Weaber. Born in Union Tv-p., Lebanon Co., Pa. Teacher 
in Fredericksburg, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). Children: Esther R. (Gehr). 

7. Harry (Henry) D. (I918 - 19 U2) Unmarried. 1 

Son of William W. and Margaret A. Lyons. Born in Butte, Mont. In U. S. Army in ' 
World War II - died in a Japanese prison cairp. | 

8. Harry Ervin (191U - m. Martha Kathaleen Neidig (I9lli - 

Son of Lloyd E. and Mary E. Bordner (Farnsvorth) . Born in Sunbury, Pa. (North- I 
umberland Co.). Boilermaker, Wilmington, Del. Veteran World War II - U. S. Arny 1 
- Sgt. No children. ; 

7. Harry Homer (1877 - 1938) - m. Mattie Wilson (l88Ii - "j 
Son of Alfred and Harriet G. Scrivener. Born in Fulton Co., 111. Farmer, near 

Bedford, Iowa (Taylor Co.). Children: (Sarah) Geneva (Johnson - Thompson), I 

Donald Homer, Eleanor (Crawford). I 

7. Harry J. (I89I - 1911) - Son of Francis A. and Mary Weidner, Bethel, Pa. 

8. Harry Jay (1938 - m. Beverly Evelyn Waite (193U - 

Son of Harry C. and Jeannette C. Crisler (Putnam). Born in San Diego, Calif. | 
Electrician, San Jose, Calif. Also lived in Long Beach, San Diego, and San Fran- j 
Cisco, Calif. No children. 1 

7. Harry L. (1902 - 1902). Son of James and Bertha Witman, Wayne Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 1 

9. Harry L. (1959 - 1959). Son of Richard G. and Mary S. Gulp. 

7. Harry M. (I883 - I89I). Son of Jacob and Sarah Matter, Jefferson Twp., Dauphin -• 

Co., Pa. I 

6. Harry Mathias (I896 - m. Name unknown. * 

Son of Frank (Charles Franklin) and Mary Heckert. Geneva, Nebr. No children. 

8. Harry R. (1921 - ra. Verna E. Holdeman (1923 - * 

Son of Ralph C. and Alice E, Meyers. Welder, Lebanon, Pa. Children: Linda, 
Donna, Judy. 

7. Harry Samuel (I887 - 1963) - m. Ida May Ream (1891 - 

Son of William J. and Emma L. Dundore. Laborer, Sheridan and Newmanstown, Pa. 
(Lebanon Co.). Children: Anna (Forry), Alice Mabel (Miller - Jury), Mary Lou =■ 
(Keppley). Also alleged father of Herbert Calvin Bordner - mother, Jane C. 
Weiser. ll^O 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Harry Samuel (1923 - m. Jean Arlene Napp (1930 - 

Son of Dorsey A, and Amelia Lubold. Born in Jordan Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa, 
Mechanic, near Middletown, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Children: Elaine Marie, Linda K., 
Karen Mary, Harry Samuel, Timothy James. 

8. Harry Samuel Jr. (1958 - . Son of Harry S. and Jean A. Napp, Middletown, Pa. 

7. Harvey (l879 - 195U) - m. Stella Darkes (cl886 - I960) 

Son of John and Diana Peiffer. Bom in Bethel Twp., Lebanon Co., Pa, Laborer 
and cigar-maker, Lebanon Co., Pa. Children: Armar J,, Myrtle June (Rinehart) 
(McMinn). 

7. Harvey Albert (1872 - 1938) - m. Maude Ethel Martin (I876 - 

Son of Tilon J. and Rebecca Schreffler. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
Teacher in public schools in Philippine Islands and Sup't. of Schools, Manila, 
P. I. (31* years). No children. Widow lives in Indianapolis, Ind. 

7. Harvey E. (l885 - 1961) - m. Delia M. Wilson (1885 - 

Son of William F. and Mary Sickmiller. Born in Flatrock Twp,, Henry Co., Ohio. 
Street-car conductor, factory foreman, gas-station attendant, Toledo, Ohio. 
Children: Delbert Eugene, Ralph, Lavon. Widow lives in Toledo, Ohio. 

7. Harvey Franklin (1888 - m. Sarah Jane Behrens (l895 - 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Matter. Railroader, lumberman, farmer, Jefferson Twp., 
Dauphin Co., Pa. Also lived in Harrisburg and Hummelstown (Dauphin Co.). Child- 
ren: Gerald Harvey, Oswald Daniel, Miriam Ruth (Heller), Roberta Freeda (Moore), 

7. Harvey Lee (1900 - m. Thelma Ruth Davis (1912 - 

Son of Albert L. and Cora I. Roberts. Farmer and egg-dealer, Lancaster, Tex. 
(Dallas Co.). Children: Jackie Lee, 

6. Harvey Nelson (1873 - I960) - m. (l) Cashbaum (cl875 - ? ); (2) (Mary) 

Alice Hathaway (l875 - 19U3). Son of Andrew J. and Mary E, Smith. Bom in Venice 
Twp., Seneca Co. Carpenter, near Convoy, Ohio; Huntington, Ft, Wayne, and South 
Whitley, Ind. Children: (l) Verna; (2) Merrill Hazen. 

6. Harvey Nelson (I87U - 1956) - ra. (l) Myrtal McCreary (cl875 - ? )j (2) Nellie E, • 

(cl880 - ? ). Son of Alfred L. and Mary B, Shinew. Born in Montgomery 

Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. Laborer and oil-field worker, Bradner and Wayne, Ohio 
(Wood Co.) and Big Springs, Tex. Children: (l) Barbara (7); (2) Mary Eleanor 
( Cramer ) . 

6. Harvey P. (18U3 - I863) Unmarried. 

Son of Jonathan and Lucinda Bearce. Born in Lewistown Twp,, Fulton Co., Ill, 
In Union Army during Civil War - Priv., Co. H, 103rd 111, Inf. Died of wounds 
received in Battle of Missionary Ridge. 

Henry (also see Harry) 



iia 



PART B - REGISTER OF BQRDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

3. Henry (I76I - 181|5) - m. Susanna Alburt (1765 - 183_) 

Son of Philip Bortner and Maria Elisabetha Velt. Changed name to "Bordner". Born 
in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Farmer, Pine Grove Twp. and Tulpehocken T-wp., 
Berks Co. and Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa., and Pike Twp., Stark 
Co., Ohio. Lived last years in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. Captain of 
local militia company in Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: Catharine (Step ?), 
Barbara (Whitmer), Susanna (Hanes), Elizabeth (Reed), Polly (Brothers), George, 
Margaret (Sarver), (John) Philip, John, Jacob, Sarah (Bordner), Henry. 

I. Henry Jr. (I806 - ? ) - m. Polly Behney (cl80U - ? ) 

Son of Henry and Susanna Alburt. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Farmer, Pike Twp. and Perry Twp., Stark Co., Ohio, and possibly in Chat- 
field Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. Children: Levi (adopted) - - any children of 
their own probably died young. 

5. Henry (18IO - ? ). Son of Jacob and Elizabeth Kern, Bethel Twp., Berks Co., and 
Turbot Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa. Probably died young. 

5. Henry (cl823 - l852) - m. (1) Mary (Polly) Shade (1826 - I8U8); (2) Catharine 

Bosetter (Zider) (cl830 - ? ). Son of George and Catharine Caninger. Born in 
Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. Farmer, Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co. and Flatrock 
Twp., Henry Co., Ohio. Children; (1) None known; (2) Amanda Ellen (Pew). Widow 
married John Glore. 

6. Henry (I828 - I89I) - m. Caroline Boyer (l839 - 1919) 

Son of Jacob and Hannah . Born in Beaver Twp., Union Co., Pa. (now in 

Snyder Co.). Farmer, Buckeye Twp. (part now in Dakota Twp.), Stephenson Coo, 
111. and near Jesup, Iowa (Buchanan Co.). Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. G, U6th 
111. Inf. Children: William Lewis, Wesley J., Richard Lewis, Edward Garfield. 

6. Henry (I832 - 190?) - m. (l) Christiana Klinger (I83O - 188?); (2) Mary Ellen 

Siders (l859 - 1911). Son of Jonathan (John) and Margareth . Born in 

Lykens Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Laborer, miner, and farmer, Wiconisco Twp., Jeffer- 
son Twp., Dauphin Co.; and in Shamokin, Northumberland Co., Pa. Civil War veteran 
- Priv. Co. E, 173rd Pa. Inf. and Co. I, lU7th Pa. Inf. Children: (l) Sarah, 
Katie, Emma May (Etzel); (2) Katie, Irwin, Jennie, Ray. 

5. (William) Heniy (I836 - 1862) Unmarried. 

Son of Michael and Leah Buchtel. Born in Montgomery Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. In 
Union Arrty in Civil War - Priv Co. D, 21st Ohio Inf. Died in service in Tenn. 

5. Henry (I836 - 19lU) - m. Louisa A. Smith (I8UI - 1910) 

Son of John and Barbara Caninger. Farmer, Flatrock Twp., Henry Co. and near 
Montpelier, Williams Co., Ohio. Also road contractor and hardware dealer. 
Children: Alice S. (Fricke), Ida May (Rothenberger), John Abram (Abram John). 

5. Henry (I8U0 - I863) Unmarried. 

Son of Joseph and Susan Michael. Bom in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co,, 
Pa. Sailor. 

5. Henry (iSUO - 1903) Unmarried. 

Son of (John) Philip and Mary Ann Guest. Born in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., 
Ohio. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. A, 68th Ohio Inf. Shoemaker, Holgate, Ohio 
(Henry Co.). Went to San Francisco. 

Iii2 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. Henry (l8h3 - 18U6). Son of Peter and Anna Maria Hepner, Northumberland Co., Pa. 

6. Henry (l8$3 - 1859). Son of Jacob and Hannah Snyder, Bethel Tvp., Berks Co., Pa. 

6, (Benjamin) Henry (cl856 - cl90l) - m. Harriet V. Dei^rick (cl860 - ? ) 

Son of John and Lavina Whary. Laborer in Shamokin, Pa, (Northumberland Co.). 
Children: Sadie I. (Kublic), Carrie (Ck)ugler). 

6. Henry (I87O - ? ). Unmarried son of Percival and Lovina Miller, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

9. Henry (19U9 - . Son of Pedro C. and Victorina Dacara, Zamboanga, Philippine Isl. 

5. Henry Harrison (I838 - 1916) - m. Catherine Metzger (l8h2 - 1913) 

Son of Jacob and Magdalena Wolf. Born in Williamsville, N. Y. Farmer near Burr 
Oak, Mich, and Onawa, Iowa. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. D, 11th Mich. Inf. 
Children: George Henry, Warren E., Orra (True), Anna (Anderson), James A. 

6. (William) Henry Harrison (l81;l - 190?) - m. Hannah Susannah Olivia Jane Gross 

(1857 - 1900). Son of John and Susanna Ramberger. Bom in. Upper Paxton Twp., 
Dauphin Co., Pa. Clerk and school-teacher in Dauphin Co., Pa. Physician in 
Snyder Co., Pa., principally in Shamokin Dam. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. A, 
210th Pa. Inf. Children: Loyetta (Snyder), (William Penn Agassus) Sherman 
Godell, (Mary) Alcesta (Alvaretta Lovinia Rosalie )(Howerter), Melvina, Olivia 
Lura Evalina (Harris), Ella Cynthia Dolena Gross (Branch). Also possibly father 
of Henry Harrison (Harry) Bordner (1865 - 1937) - mother unknown - born in 
vicinity of Halifax, Pa. 

6. Henry Klahr (I8U0 - cl8U5). Son of Daniel and Hannah Klahr, Berks Co., Pa. 

7. Henry Leroy (190U - 1958) - m. (l) Blanche E. Baily (I90U - 1925); (2) Irma 

Engel (1897 - . Son of Charles N. and Daisy M. Ziegler. Born in Herndon, Pa. 
(Northumberland Co.). Automobile-body repairman, Detroit, Mich. Also lived in 
Mt. Pleasant Mills, Pa. (Snyder Co.). Children: (l) Blanche (Dangler); (2) None. 

5. Henry Milton (1853 - I887) - m. Sarah E. Seller (cl856 - ? ) 

Son of George and Susan Phillips. Laborer in Lower Mahanoy Twp,, Northumberland 
Co., Pa. Children: Jennie (Bogar), Susan E., Charles Nelson, William E., 
George N. 

7. Henry Milton (1913 - m. Frances H. Buffington (cl917 - 

Son of John F.and Sula C. Bickhart. Born in Lewisburg, Pa. (Union Co.). Steel- 
mill safety-inspector, Steelton, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Children: Richard, Yvonne 
(Gorecki). 

6. Henry Peter (i860 - ? ) - m. Margaret Arnett (cl860 - ? ) 

Son of George Washington and Mary Ann Bolender. Farmer, Lewistown Twp., Fulton 
Co., 111. Children: Ross A. 

8. Herald Le Roy (I9OO - m. Lola M. Kochel (1900 - 

Son of William H. and Lillie I. Gottschall. Born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., 
Pa. Factory product inspector, Baltimore, Md. Also lived in Lancaster, Harris- 
burg, Glenside, Chester, and Williamsport, Pa. and in Camden and Cranford, N.J. 
Children: Margaret (Faye)(KrQse), Jacqueline Claire. 

1U3 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAKILIES 

8. Herbert C. (190? - in. (l) Florence E. Klopp (cl913 - ; (2) Helen G. Lutz (1917- 
Son of (Milton) Miles and Dora A. Kline. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
Custodian of high school, Hamburg, Pa. (Berks Co.). Onetime telephone lineman. 
Children: (l) Gerald B., Betty B. (Berk); (2) None. 

8. Herbert Calvin (191U - m. Marian C. Nagle (1917 - 

Alleged son of Harry Samuel Bordner (l887 - 1963) and Jane Weiser. Knitter, 
Strausstown, Pa. (Berks Co.). Children: Joan M. (Buckwalter), Janice A., Curtis 
C, Kathleen A., Pearl E., Brian G., Shirley A., Susan L. 

8. Herbert Eugene (1935 - m. Joan Carol Ely (19U2 - 

Son of Willard G. and Beatrice M. Haynes. Born in Montpelier, Ohio. Factory 
worker, Jonesville, Mich. In U. S. Arny for 8 years - Sgt, Children: Dawn Marie, 
Debra Jo, Darcy Gene. 

8. Herbert Loyal (1923 - m. Ella Majewski (1923 - 

Son of Arleigh E. and Lela M. Westbrook. Construction worker, Chicago, 111. 
Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: Bruce Edward. 

7. Herbert Oscar (1900 - m. Lena Lucette Snyder (1902 - 

Son of Daniel W, and Elizabeth Fetterman. Farmer, near Dornsife, Pa, (Northumber- 
land Co.). Children: Merlin D., Guy William, Lorrane June (Reed), Earl K., Gene 
Herbert. 

5. Hiram (l8h0 - 1911) - m. Mary Jordan (I8I4O - 1925) 

Son of Jacob and Lydia Guest. Born in Liberty Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio and raised 
in Liberty Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. Farmer, poultryman, and fruit dealer in Wood Co. 
and Seneca Co., Ohio. Lived last years in Toledo, Ohio. Civil War veteran - Priv. 
Co. C, 21st Ohio Inf. Lost an arm and taken prisoner in Battle of Chickamauga. 
Children: Mary (Baldwin or Clapsaddle - Blair), Carrie, Alta V. (Ducat), Anna B., 
Bessie (Heyman). 

6. Homer (l855 - 1923) - m. Mary Elizabeth Blackaby (1865 - 19U5) 

Son of Jonathan and Lucinda Bearce. Farmer in Lewistown Twp. and Putnam Twp., 
Fulton Co., 111. Children: Laura (Allen), Alma (Lilly), John Harvey, Dayton Al- 
fred, Homer A., Lucille A. (O'Bryant), Mary M. Lawrence I. 

7. Homer A. (l897 - 1958) - m. Jessie Hilton (1900 - 

Son of Homer and Mary E. Blackaby. Born in Fulton Co., 111. Meat-cutter, Lewis- 
town and Morrison, 111. Children: Kenneth, Maurice, Marion. 

7. Homer E. (I878 - 19U5)- m. Catherine Edna Yutzey (1882 - I9U0) 

Son of Jonathan V. and Cora Van Horn. Born in Lima, Ohio. Telephone repairman. 
Canton and Louisville, Ohio. Spanish-American War veteran - 8th Ohio Inf. Child- 
ren: Ralph E., Grace E. (Shearer). 

8. Howard (1920 - . Son of Frank and Mary Alice Blett, Northumberland Co., Pa. 

- Unmarried. 

8. Howard Charles (1915 - 1951) - m. Bonnie Pierce (cl9l5 - 

Son of Charles E. and Sarah Usher. Born in Delmont, S. D. Laborer in S. D., Ore., 
and Utah (died in Salt Lake City). World War II veteran - U. S. Arny - Sgt. 
Children: None. 

1I;U 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MLES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Howard Elwood (I883 - 1959) - m. Frances Boisher (188? - 

Son of John E. and Catherine Eo Friend. Farmer in Florence Twp., Williams Co., 
Ohio. Children: Weldon La-Mar. Widow lives near Edon, Ohio. 

7. Howard Franklin (cl909 - I960) - m. Bernice Duerr (cl911 - 

Son of Frank (Franklin) W. and Marzella Arner. Born near Bolivar, Ohio (Tuscarawas 
Co.). Nurseryman, Canton, Ohio. Veteran World War II - U. S. Army. No children. 
Widow lives near Magnolia, Ohio. 

7. Howard Jacob (l879 - 1879). Son of Daniel K.and Sarah M. Geyer, Stephenson Co., 111. 

7. Howard Solomon (1910 - m. (l) Gladys Kuzmonovitch (1915 - ? (2) Mildred Eberhardt 
(I91U - . Son of Otis E. and Margaret B. Van Coyte. Factory machine operator, 
South Bend, Ind. Children: (l) Jean Anne (Bruggeman); (2) None. 

7. Howard Woodman (1903 - m. Bessie Marion Farnsworth (I898 - 

Son of Guy D. and Vinnie M. Woodman. Born in Burr Oak, Mich. Public accountant, 
Chicago, 111. Deputy Director, Corporation Audits Division, U. S. General Account- 
ing Office; Deputy Comptroller (Accounting, Finance and Audit Policy), Dept. of 
Defense, Washington, D. C. Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy - Comdr. Children: 
Joanne Marjorie (Telfer), Harrison Edward. 

6. Hubert (I869 - I869). Son of Moses and Margaret Ewers, near Lewistovm, 111. 

5. Hugh (I8UO - 1889) - m. Elizabeth Gangluff (l8U3 - 1922) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Kocher. Born in Chatfield Tv/p,, Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Farmer and carpenter, Chatfield Twp., Cranberry Twp., and New Washington (Crawford 
Co.) and Venice Twp., Seneca Co., Ohio. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. H, 123rd 
Ohio Inf. Children: Amos, Elvira (Blla-Stoutenaur), Lovina (Guiss), Adam F., 
William Henry, Minnie A. (Kodesch). 

7. Ira (cl880 - ? ) Unmarried 

Son of Lewis and • Believed to have lived near Joplin, 

Missouri. 

6. (Isaiah) Ira (l862 - ? ) - m. Name unknown 

Son of Daniel and Elizabeth Wilson. Born in De Witt Twp., De Witt Co., 111. 
Children: Melvin J.; perhaps others, unknown. No other information. 

7. Ira (1891 - 1923) - m. Lillian Spain (l897 - 

Son of Charles W. and Sarah A. Foster. Fanner, near De Soto and Cedar Hill, Tex. 
Children: Thelma Savada(Phipps), Helen Marie, Charles W. Widow near Lancaster, Tex. 

7. Ira Franklin (I866 - 19U0) - m. Elizabeth Miller (cl870 - ? ) 

Son of John W. and Isabella (Susan) Whitman. Jackson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Child- 
ren: JohnE., Maude M. (Rosener), Airmon. 

7. Ira Jacob (1875 - 1962) - m. Kathryn D. Alkire (I88I; - 1957) 

Son of Augustus S. and Eva C. Anderson. Retail lumber dealer and farmer, Brookston, 
Ind. (White Co.). Children: Karl Alkire, William Augustus, Jack, Ralph Alkire. 

2k$ 



PART B - REGISTER CF BOHDNER MAIES AND THEIR FAM ILIES 

6. Ira Levi (I889 - 1966) - ra. (l) Deborah Cagg (l893 - ; (2) Bessie Fisher (Wark) 

(cl890 - 1957); (3) Bertha I. Hice (Durant) (I896 - . Son of Levi and Mary J. 
Leister. Bom in Crawford Co., Ohio. Journeyman iron-worker, Columbus, Ohio and 
other places. Lived last years in or near Daytona Beach, Fla. Veteran World War I 
- U. S. Amy. Children: (l) Elmer Franklin, Irma (White - Ryan), Eugene E. (2) 
None; (3) None. 

7. Irvin Alfred (1901 - m. Josephine Elizabeth Hilbush (1903 - 

Son of Charles R. and Olive F. Schreffler. Carpenter, Herndon, Pa. (Northumber- 
land Co.). Children: Shirley Romayne (Fralick), Richard Lewis, Bobbie Orville, 
Betty Lou (Deppen). 

8. Irvin Elmer (193U - . Son of Arthur B. and Helen Bowels, Beloit, Wise. Last known 

to be living in Rockford, 111. 

6. Irvin H. (I86I - ? ). Son of Daniel and Matilda Brassier, Berrysburg, Pa, (Dauph- 
in Co.). No information after I88O. 

6. Irving Jay (I88O - ? ) - m. Name unknown 

Son of Daniel and Anna Whitmer. Born in Swanton Twp., Lucas Co., Ohio. Lived in 
Indio, Calif. No other information, except no children. 

7. Irwin (1893 - ? ). Son of Henry and Mary E. Siders, Shamokin, Pa. No information. 

7. Irwin W. (1859 - 19Ul) - m. Clara R. Stanmeyer (cl860 - 1925) 

Son of Daniel T. and Sarah Weaber. Born in Union Twp., Lebanon Co., Pa. Employed 
by a wholesale grocery, Chicago, 111. No children. 

Isaac (also see Israel) 

h. Isaac (1822 - 1899) - m. Magdalena Eyster (I823 - cl865) 

Son of Balthaser and Magdalena Enlerich. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. Farmer in Lower Mahanoy Twp., also Chapman Twp., Snyder Co., Pa. 
and York Twp., Elkhart Co., Ind. (near Bristol, Ind). Children: John, Amelia 
Catharine, Henrietta (Kauffman). 

5. Isaac (1822 - ? ) - ra. Maria Gergins (l829 - ? ) 

Son of Daniel and Catharine Viehman. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Black- 
smith in Tulpehocken Twp., Berks Co, and Swatara Twp., Lebanon Co. up to i860. 
Children: Mary Elenora, Anne Pamilla, Tody (?) Sederas (son). No record after 
i860. 

5. Isaac (1832 - 1918) - ra. Mary J. Smith (CI836 - 1910) 

Son of (John) Philip and Mary Ann Guest. Born in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio and 
raised in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. Farmer in Venice Twp., Seneca Co, 
and Sandusky Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. Manufacturer, Shelby, Ohio (Shelby Seam- 
less Steel Tube Co.). In late years lived in Pasadena and Long Beach, Calif, 
Children: Mary E., Amanda J. (McAlister), Sarah A. (Kaiser). Also adopted son, 
Isaac Andrew, who was son of his brother, Jesse and first wife, Eliza Weaver. 

5. Isaac (18U3 - 1912) - m. Harriet Reichenbach (l8li9 - 192h) 

Son of Peter and Anna Maria Hepner. Farmer and blacksmith in Point Twp. and 

Vtest Chillisquaqua Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: Richard R. , Elizabeth 

(Bollinger), Charles W. , Benjamin, Frank, Clara (Ramer), John, (Harriet) Adda 

(Gibbons), Florence (Heiges). 

lUo 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALBS AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. Isaac (18$U - 1926) - m. Elizabeth Ashenfelter (l873 - 196U) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine Shutt (Miller). Originally named "Isaiah". Farmer and 
laborer in Liberty Twp., Wood Co. and Richfield Twp., Henry Co., Ohio and in and 
near Midland and Coleman, Mich. Children: Clyde Everette, Martin Dorce, Burton 
Florce, (Ooldie) Fay (Widenor), (Effie) Trynette (Brown). 

6. Isaac Andrew (1868 - 19h7) - m. Mary Jane Egner (1872 - 1965) 

Son of Jesse and Eliza Weaver. Adopted son of Isaac and Mary J. Smith. Born in 
Flatrock Twp., Henry Co., Ohio. Raised principally in Shelby, Ohio. Construction 
superintendent, Los Angeles, Calif. Children: Nancy Viola (Leaver), (Isaac) 
Martin. 

5. Isaac Elmer (l865 - 19U3) - m. Anna Anderson (l872 - 1951) 

Son of George and Susan Phillips. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Farmer and laborer, Rush Twp. and Riverside, Northumberland Co., Pa. Child- 
ren: George, Mary K., Anna R. (Deeter), Helen M. (Smith), Sarah E. (Balliet), 
Wilhelmina Jane (Murphy), William Morris. 

6. Isaac J. (cl867 - 19U7) - m. Harriet Rebecca Kantz (I867 - 1937) 

Son of Bnanuel and Mary Ann Trego. Born in Chapman (now Union) Twp., Snyder Co,, 
Pa. Farmer near Pilger, Nebr. Children: Earl, Birdie Mae (Koehler). 

6. Isaac Jacob H. (I8U6 - 1920) - m. Amelia (Emilie) Lucretia Wolfersberger (l85U - 
- 1928). Son of David and Dina Schneider. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
Dry-goods merchant, Mt. Aetna, Pa, (Berks Co.). Children: Lottie Pearl (Schoener) 
Cloyd W., Tildeo, David Stanton, Harry, Frank Stanton, Any Lucretia (Witter- 
Filbert). 

6. Israel John (l850 - 1931) - m. Nancy M. Cook (1852 - 1892) 

Son of Augustus L. and Harriet (Henrietta) Moyer. Bom in Tulpehocken Twp., 
Berks Co., Pa. Tailor in early life. Carpenter and temporary partner in retail 
lumber business, Brookston, Ind. (White Co.). Originally named "Isaac John**. 
Children: Lynn Howard, Itoy Jay, Guy Kelley. 

8. Ivan Devon (1933 - m. Shirley Canp (cl935 - 

Son of William H. and Bernice L. Brown. Bom in Niles, Mich. Tile-setter in St. 
Petersburg and Cocoa, Fla. Children: Debbie, Susan. 

Jack (also see John, Jonathan) 

7. Jack (I90li - 1908). Son of Charles E. and Grace M. Bateman, Tucker, Utah. 

8. Jack (1918 - m. (l) Jane Garvin (1918 - 1965); (2) Carol Corinne Streavel (1918- 

Son of Ira J. and Kathryn D. Alkire. Farmer and laborer, Brookston, Ind. (White 
Co.). Children: (l) Janet Ann (Borman - Moscone), Jacqueline (Cook); (2) None. 

9. Jack Edward (1925 - m. Ruby M. Deardorff (1928 - 

Son of George K. and Stella M. Ellis. Plumber and steam-fitter, Kokomo, Ind. 
Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy Seabees. Children: Kenneth Richard, Terry Lynn, 
Joseph Alan, Debra Ann. 
8. Jack Elza (1935 - m. Martha Davis (193U - 

Son of Lester J. and Lillie M. Crook. Lives in Uniondale, Ind. (Wells Co.). 
Children: Michael Ray, Bruce Neal, Linda Gay. 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIBS I 

7. Jack M. (1926 - m. Patricia L. Paljner (1928 - 

Son of Ora H. and Nellie Eisner. Born in Hayden, N. M. Ass't. sup't. of Shasta I 
Trailer Co., Pacoima, Calif. Also lived in Clayton, Las Vegas, and Santa Fe.,N,M. j 
and Burbank, Calif. Veteran World War II - U. S. Marine Corps. Children: SusanB. ', 
and Mary L, ' 

8. Jackie Lee (19U2 - , Son of Harvey L. and Thelma R. Davis, Lancaster, Tex. 

2. Jacob (cl720 - 1792) - m. Sarah Bait (cl730 - cl800) 

Son of Balthaser Bortner and Maria Elisabetha . Bom in one of the independ- 
ent German States in the Rhine River Valley, probably the Palatinate. Came to 
Pennsylvania Colony with parents in 1732. Farmer in the Tulpehocken Settlement 
(area originally in Lancaster Co., but in Berks Co. after 1752). Acquired farm 
in 1761 from the Proprietors, Richard and Thomas Penn, in Bethel Twp., Berks Co. 
In Colonial military service during King George's War (17U6/7). Children: 
(John) Jacob, Anna Maria (Schneider), William, John, Barbara, Peter, Daniel. 
First to change family name to "Bordner". 

3. (John) Jacob (17$U - l837) - m. Anna Maria Brosz (1761 - I839) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Bait. Born in Tulpehocken Settlement, Berks Co., Pa, In- 
herited father's farm in Bethel Twp., Berks Co. In Pennsylvania militia during 
Revolutionary War. Children: Catharine (Lebo), Jacob (died in childhood), John, 
Mary Elizabeth (Deck ?), Susanna, Eva Maria (Knebel ?), Juliana (Weber), Jacob. 

h. Jacob (I77U - CI828) - m. Elizabeth (cl778 - cl852) 

Son of Jacob Bortner and Susanna (Meyer ? ). Born in Warwick Twp., Lancaster Co., 
Pa. Sometimes known as "Bordner", although it is uncertain whether he changed his 
name. However, children used "Bordner" name. Farmer in East Pennsborough Twp., 
Cumberland Co., Pa. and Beaver Twp., Northumberland Co, (part later in Union 
Co. and now in Snyder Co.), Pa. Children: Jacob, George, Elizabeth (Manger or 
Mengel), Catharine (Wagoner), Hannah (Wolf - Wormley), Benjamin, Sophia (Durling 
- Windecker). Widow lived in Town of Fayette, Seneca Co., N. Y. ■ 

.1 
U. Jacob (1782 - CI79O). Son of Jacob and Anna Maria Brosz, Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa, 

U. Jacob (1785 - 1823) - m, Elizabeth Kern (l805 - 7 ) • 

Son of Daniel and Eva (Knaeves ?). Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa, Farmer in 
Turbot Twp. Northumberland Co., Pa, Family returned to Bethel Twp., Berks Co. 
aft^r he died. Children: Maria (Moll), John, Henry, Elizabeth (Schaffer), Cath- 
arine (Bechtel), Susanna (Smith), Lydia (Moyer). 

U. Jacob (1787 - 185_) - m. Maria (1790 - I869) 

Son of William and Elizabeth Koppenhef f er . Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa, 
Farmer in Mifflin Twp, and Lykens Twp., Dauphin Co,, Pa. Children: Catharine 
(Imshoff stall), Anna Maria (Mary - Harman), Jacob, Jonathan (John), Veronica 
(Fronicka)( Shell), William, and possibly one or two others who died in infancy. 

h. Jacob (1793 - 1867) - m. Catharine Lerch (1793 - I868) 

Son of Jacob and Anna Maria Brosz (second of that name, the first having died 
in childhood). Farmer, Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Inherited part of his 
father's farm, including homestead. Children: Joanna, Augustus L., John, Mary 
(Rollman), Thomas L. (Lerch ?). ,_ 



PART B - REGISTER OF BQRDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

S. Jacob (1801 - 1880) - ra. Hannah _^ (l80$ - I87O) 

Son of Jacob Bortner (Bordner ?) and Elizabeth . Born in East Pennsborough 

Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. Farmer, Beaver Twp,, Union Co. (now in Snyder Co.), Pa., 
Centre Co., Pa. and Buckeye Twp. (part now in Dakota Twp.), Stephenson Co., 111. 
Children: George, Henry, Mary, Caroline (Wolf - Marlin), Daniel M., Elizabeth, 
Sarah. 

U. Jacob (1803 - 1863) - m. Sarah Kocher (I8l9 - 1915) 

Son of Henry and Susanna Alburt. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Farmer in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio and Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Children: Daniel, Hugh, Milo, Samuel, Andrew Jacob, Nancy A. (Clady), Eliza 
(Mills), Levi, Mary (Ulmer), Sophia (Shalter), Aaron. 

I4. Jacob (I80U - 1879) - m. (l) Lydia Guest (cl8lO - cl81i5); (2) Catharine Shutt 
(Miller) (cl825 - 1908). Son of Peter and Catharine Katterman. Born in Upper 
Paxton Twp. (now in Mifflin Twp.), Dauphin Co., Pa. Farmer in Pike Twp., Stark 
Co., Ohio; Liberty Twp., Crawford Co.; and Liberty Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. Child- 
ren:(])Lavina (Yant), Jeremiah (Jerry), Catharine, Washington, Hiram. (2) Josiah 
(Joseph), Isaiah (Isaac), Frank, Hattie, John J. 

U. Jacob (180U - 18U5) - m. (Mary) Magdalena Wolf (I8O8 - I8UJ4) 

Son of Balthaser and Magdalena Emerich. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. Butcher in Lower Mahanoy Twp. and in Williamsville, N. Y. Child- 
ren: George, Lucy Ann, Augustus, Sarah (Hill), William, Elias, Henry Harrison, 
Benjamin Franklin, Martha (Pyle). 

5. Jacob (I81U - 1886) - m. (1) Maria Snyder (I8l2 - I863); (2) Christiana 



(1817 - 1878). Son of Jacob and Maria . Born in Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., 

Pa. Laborer in Wiconisco Twp., Dauphin Co. Farmer in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co. 
(Powell's Valley). Children: (l) Emaline (Hoffman), Elizabeth, Catharine (Etz- 
weiler), Amanda (Bergner), Mary (Hoffman - Landis), Anna (Knouf), John Adam, 
Daniel, Lucetta (Welker); (2) Christine (Bergner). 

5. Jacob (1822 - 1890) - m. Hannah Snyder (l823 - 1900) 

Son of John and Elizabeth Hoffman. Farmer in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Civil 
War veteran - Priv. Co. B, 50th Pa. Inf. and Co. E, 2nd U. S. Art. Children: 
Henry, Emeline Sarah, John M., Sarah. 

5. Jacob (I82U - ? ) 

Son of Godfrey and Sarah Gasser. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Unmarried 
cabinet-maker in Tulpehocken Twp., Berks Co. in 18^0. Went to Calif, in l85l. 
No subsequent information. 

5. Jacob (I82U - 1897) - m. Sarah Coler (1832 - 190h) 

Son of John and Barbara Caninger. Bom in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio and raised 
in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co. Farmer in Flatrock Twp., Henry Co. and Florence 
Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. Children: Nancy Ann (Carson), Martha Jane, John E., 
Amanda Ellen (Huntington), James, Emma (Darr), William, Ida May (Brigle), Lena 
Dell (Fox), Charles W. 

6. Jacob (1837 - ? ). Son of Jonathan and Margareth . Born in Lykens or Wicon- 

isco Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Shoemaker. Seriously wounded in battle in Civil War, 
he deserted in hospiital, and later after he was caught, deserted a second time. 
No subsequent record. . 



T\ 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Jacob (18U6 - 1921) - m. Rebecca Zeller (l8$6 - 1937) 

Son of John and Susanna Wenger. Merchant in Bethel and Lebanon, Pa. Children: 
Cora Agnes, Milton J., Lilly R. (Metherell), Mary E. (Ayres), Stanton W., Clin- 
ton Valentine, Valentine Clinton, Sadie (Weaver), Walter, Martha, Pierce, 
Ralph C, Stella (Boltz). 

6. Jacob (1853 - 1936) - m. Sarah Matter (185U - 1935) 

Son of William and Susanna Rank. Farmer and laborer in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin 
Co., Pa. Children: William H., Emma C. (Gottschall), John Wesley, Louisa A., 
Joseph F., Charles Edgar, Harry M., Anna A. (Hockenburg), Curtin Eugene, Harvey 
Franklin, Sadie (Snyder), George W., Charlotte Elva (Enders), Mable I. 

8. Jacob (189U - . Unmarried. 

Son of Addison and Rebecca Shaeffer. Bom in North Lebanon Twp., Lebanon Co., 
Pa. Lives near Fredericksburg, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). 

5. Jacob C. (cl81|8 - cl875) - m. Celia Leithmann (cl850 - ? ) 

Son of Michael and Catharine Koppenheffer. Bom in Mifflin Tvp., Dauphin Co., 
Pa. Salesman, Philadelphia, Pa. Children: Clarence Leithnann. 

6. Jacob F. (18U9 - 1917) - m. Harriet Snyder (l8ii9 - 1923) 

Son of John and Margaret Fishel. Carpenter, Winterstown, Pa. (York Co.). 
Changed name back to "Bortner". Children all named "Bortner". 

7. Jacob H. (187U - 19U9) - m. Ida Weaver (l880 - 

Son of John and Diana Peiffer. Farmer, laborer, and miner, principally in Swat- 
ara Twp., Lebanon Co., Pa. Children: Dawson M,, Boyd M., Paul P., Lloyd P., 
James A. 

8. Jacob Jeffrey (1903 - m. Katie Rebecca Scholl (l90h - 

Son of Charles Edgar and Margaret L. Keefer. Bom in Jefferson Twp.. Dauphin Co., 
Pa. Railroad-track maintenance-worker, Joliett, Pa. (Schuylkill Co.) Children: 
John Jacob, Charles A., Helen (Haubenstine). 

6. Jacob K. (Klein ?) (l833 - 1912) - m. Ellen L. Fehr (1837 - 1919) 

Son of George and Wilhelmina Klein. Born in Town of Fayette, Seneca Co., N. Y. 
Farmer in Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. Children: Alavesta, Charles S. 

6. Jacob Miller (l85h - 19U2) - m. Ellen Hain (l853 - 1931) 

Son of Percival and Lovina Miller. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Stage- 
driver, Bernville, and huckster, Robesonia, Pa. (Berks Co.). Children: John 
Amendon, Clara Anna. Harry Adam. 

7. Jacob Milton (1868 - 1915) - m. Agnes Amelia Shaub (also known as Minnie Davis) 

(1869 - ? ). Son of John A. and Elizabeth Hawk. Foundry molder. Lived in 
Enhaut and elsewhere in Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: William George. 

6. James (1856 - 1931) - m. Louisa Ruramel (l859 - 192U) 

Son of George and Wilhelmina Klein. Farmer in Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
Children: William George, Raymond Earl, Eva (Hotze). 

6. James (1859 - i860). Son of Jacob and Sarah Coler, Williams Co., Ohio. 

6. James (I868 - cl868). Son of William and Susanna Runk, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

150 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMIL IES 

6. James (I87O - 1936) - m. (l) Flora A. Keiser (cl871 - I898); (2) Bertha Witman 
(1872 - 1925). Son of William and Susanna Runk. Born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin 
Co., Pa. Blacksmith, Tower City, Enterline, and Mine City, Pa. Children: (l) 
George; (2) Harry L. (In public birth record, George's mother was named "Mary".) 

6. James (cl873 - ? ) - Apparently died young. Son of Levi and Mary Bright, 
Elkhart Co., Ind. 

9. James (1937 - m. Leticia Siega (cl937 - 

Son of Juan C. and Regina Limen. Zamboanga, Philippine Islands. 

10. James (1955 - • Son of Robert W. and Donna M. Savage, Crittenden, N, Y. 

6. James A. (I878 - m. Georgia Hackett (cl880 - cl9U5) 

Son of Henry H. and Catherine Metzger. Farmer near Onawa, Iowa, Ffetired in 
Portland, Ore. No children. 

8. James A. (190$ - m. (l) Nora Schwartz (Klahr or Klater) (19IO - ; (2) Gene- 

vieve E. Hopkins (I9O8 - . Son of Jacob H. and Ida Weaver. Born in Bethel 
Twp., Lebanon Co., Pa. Taxidermist. Lived in Brooklyn, N. Y.j San Antonio, 
Tex.; in Colorado; and Detroit, Mich, (probably also in other places). Child- 
ren: (1) Arlene J. (Morrisey); (2) Donald Itoy. 

9. James Dewayne (1939 - m. Mary Kay Milliatt (cl9U0 - 

Won of Wayne E. and Alta Hart. Electrical engineer, Washington, Pa. Born in 
Montpelier, Ohio. Children: Craig Scott, Christopher David. 

6. James E. (I872 - 1953) - m. Leoria S. McLouth (I87U - 19U8) 

Son of Alfred and Jane Hasson. Farmer in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. 
Children; Tolan, Otto E., Wade H., Clifford H., Ross C. 

8. James E. (1922 - I92I4). Son of Tolan and Mabel Prose, Fulton Co., 111. 

9. James E. (1937 - Unmarried. 

Son of (Charles) Edgar Jr. and Hazle Shomper. Born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin 
Co., Pa. Public-school teacher, Halifax, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 

8. James Edward (1908 - m. Bernice Tolson (1903 - 

Son of Frank E. and Sarah E. Byrnes. Born in Darlington, Wise. Truck-driver, 
Beloit, Wise. Children: Francis Edward. 

8. James Edward (1933 - m. Sue A. Buckley (193U - 

Son of Floyd V. and Alverta M. Marquart. Biyer for wholesale hardware company, 
Ft. Wayne, Ind. Children: James Edward, Gregory S., Michael P. 

9. James Edward Jr. (1956 - . Son of James E, and Sue A. Buckley, Ft, Wayne, Ind. 

8. James Emerson (1929 - m. Patricia A. Mershing (1929 - 

Son of Thoburn E. and Miriam L. Griffith. Bom in Willard, Ohio. Tool-and-die 
design-engineer. Gay lord, Mich. Children: Timothy Mark, James Michael. 

151 



PARI B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. James Frederick (1937 - m. Marilyn (cl9UU - 

Son of Glen and La Moile Scheiber. Construction worker, Mishawaka, Ind. 

9. James Kelley (19U9 - • Son of Guy K. and Elsie M. Forbes, Norfolk, Va. 
9. James Leo (1965 - . Son of Francis E. and Rachel A. Fairman, North Chicago, 111, 

8. James Lloyd (1932 - . m. Ann Marie Mack (1937 - 

Son of William H. and Bernice L. Brown. Bom in Niles, Mich. Policeman, St. Pet- 
ersburg, Fla. Children: Evelyn Marie, Darlene Ann. Diana Lee, James Lloyd. 

9. James Lloyd Jr. (1961 - . Son of James L. and Ann Marie Mack, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

9. James Michael (1953 - . Son of James E. and Patricia A. Mershing, Gay lord, Mich. 

10. James Michael (1959 - . Son of Richard C. and Eleanor Uhler, Jonestown, Pa. 

6. James Monroe (185U - 1938) - m. Emma Bachtel (1866 - 1937) 

Adopted son of grandfather, John P. Bordner, Bethlehem Twp. and Pike Twp., Stark 
Co., Ohio. Son of John Alexander and Harriet Bordner (Alexander). Carpenter and 
railroad-car upholsterer, Sandyville, Malvern, Brewster, Minerva, and other 
places in vicinity of Canton, Ohio. Children: Ethel (Pressley), Roy Levi, Eldon 
Hubert, William Lorin, James Monroe. 

7. James Monroe Jr. (l899 - 1905). Son of James M. and Emma Bachtel, Stark Co., 0. 

8. James Otis (1919 - m. Gladys Fay King (1921 - 

Son of Otis M. and Levetah L. Shaw. Born in Kansas City, Kans. Civil engineer, 
Phillips Petroleum Co., Sweeny, Tex. Also lived in Bartlesville, Okla. and Old 
Ocean, Tex. Children: Suzanne, Betty Ann. 

8. James Patrick (19U5 - . Son of Ralph 0. and Mayme K. Bartlett, Tiffin, Ohio. 

9. James Perry (19h2 - m. Catherine Martin (19U3 - 

Son of Delmar J. B. and Martina Brenner. With P. J. Bordner & Co., Inc. (food 
stores), Massillon, Ohio. 

8. James Richard (1939 - . Unmarried. 

Son of (Clarence) Paul and Anna Potter. Clerk, Bennett, Colo. 

9. James Steven (195U - • Son of Harold C. and Marjorie Keister, Dakota, 111. 

7. James Stokes (1906 - m. Florence Carpenter (1907 - 

Son of Johnson Per Lee and Jane 0. Stokes. Industrial blacksmith. Canton, Ohio. 
In U. S. Army in the twenties. Children: George Carpenter, La Vonne Anita (Newton)! 



^ 



6. James W. (1879 - cl935) - m. Mary Warren (cl879 - ? ) 

Son of Jesse and Mary A. Burk. Laborer in and around Defiance and Holgate, Ohio. I 
No chi].dren. 

9. Jan Robert (19U7 - • Son of Robert U. and Elizabeth Olson, Wheatridge, Colo. 

152 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Jason E. (I88I - 1937) - m. Myrtle Devies (1882 - 

Son of Jonathan V. and Cora Van Horn. Born in Shawnee Twp., Allen Co., Ohio. Mill 
worker. North Canton, Carrollton, and Cleveland, Ohio, and Dearborn, Mich. Child- 
ren: Foster E., Jess L., Chester R. Widow lives in Canton, Ohio. 

6. Jay (1888 - 1925) - m. Gladys Crosby (cl900 - 

Son of Henry (Harry) C. and Emma (Woods). Born in Chicago, 111. Machinist in East 
Waterloo, Iowa. Children: Gus W. Widow remarried and lives in Clarion, Iowa. 

8. Jay Clifford (1893 - m. Laura Englesen (l897 - 

Son of Charles L. and Nettie E. Folgate. Born in Nodaway Co., Mo. Restaurant op- 
erator, Taycheedah, Wise. Also lived in Ft. Dodge, Iowa, Stephenson Co., 111., 
and elsewhere in Illinois and MicMgan. Veteran World War I - U. S. Arny - Corp. 
Children: Mary Louise (Trexell). 

8. Jay L. (1888 - 1957) - m. Name unknown 

Son of Wesley J. and Lillian Cornick. Born in Jesup, Iowa. Clerk, Waupaca, Wise. 
Veteran World War I. No children. 

9. Jeffery Allen (i960 - . Son of William P. and Barbara J. Wailes, Bennett, Colo. 

10. Jeffrey (i960 - . Son of John F. and Rita Kramer, Wiconisco, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 
10. Jeffrey (1962 - . Son of Ralph E. and Judith Estherly, Highspire, Pa. 

9. Jeffrey Alan (I963 - . Son of Merlin D. and Joan M. Soule, Middletown, Pa. 
8. Jeffrey Allen (1957 - . Son of Thomas Q. and Florence I. Martz, Dalmatia, Pa, 

8. Jeffrey Roland (1958 - . Son of Roland L. and Doris A. Harris, Houston, Tex. 

9. Jeffrey Scott (I963 - . Son of Rodney and Carol J. Baldwin, Lansing, Mich. 

8. Jeffrey Todd (1951 - . Son of Elmer F. and Frances P. Todd (Blue), Columbus, Ohio, 

10. Jeffrey W. (196I - , Son of Ralph William and Jacqueline M. Henry, North Canton, 0. 
Jeremiah (also see Jerry) 

5. Jeremiah C. (1859 - 1929) - m. Matilda D. Snyder (l856 - 193h) 

Son of George and Susan Phillips. Farmer and mason in Lower Mahanoy Twp., North- 
umberland Co., Pa. Children: Loyetta (Atkins), Dorsey Allen, Naomi (Ames), 
Austin E., John W. 

7. Jeremiah C. (1922 - 1922) - Son of Dorsey A. and Maude A. Lubold, Northumerland 

Co,, Pa. 

7. Jerome H. (I888 - I889). Son of Jerome M. and Mary A. Horstick, Palnyra, Pa, 

6. Jerome M. (l850 - 1932) - m. Mary A. Horstick ( 181^9 - 1922) 

Son of John and Cathiarine Miller. Born in East Hanover Tv;p., Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Carpenter in Palmyra and Collegeville, Pa. Children: Margaret C. (Ehrman), 
John H., George H., Jerome H., Allen F., Simon Robert (Robert Simon). 

153 



I 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MAIES AND THEIR FAMILIES 
Jerry (also see Jeremiah) 

5. Jerry (Jeremiah) (l835 - 1919) - m. Sabina (Bina) Hull (l8U5 - cl920) 

Son of Jacob and Lydia Guest. Bom in Pike T-wp., Stark Co., Ohio 5 raised in Lib- 
erty Tvp., Crawford Co. Farmer in Liberty Twp, Wood Co., Ohio. Civil War veteran 

- Priv. Co. C, 21st Ohio Inf. Children: Adella (Delia) Levers, Blanche, George, 
Marguerite (Maggie) M. (Roe), Belle (Osborn), Earl, Maud M., Nellie, Roy, Frank. 

8. Jerry A. (1958 - 1965). Son of Paul D. and Mary G. R. Herb, near Herndon, Pa. 

6. Jerry Elwood (I88O - 1963) Unmarried. 

Son of Samuel and Leanna Stout. Born in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Baptist minister, principally in Laurel, Mont. 

9. Jerry Elwood (1922- ra. Betty Zimmerman (cl922 - 

Son of Roy E. and Pauline Wike. Millwright, Harrisburg, Pa. Children: Patricia 
(Gipe), Jerry Elwood. 

10. Jerry Elwood Jr. (I9UI4 - • Son of Jerry E, and Betty Zimmerman, Harrisburg, Pa, 

9. Jerry Lee (1958 - . Son of Lyle M. and Helen E. Green, Pinellas Park, Fla. 

6. Jerry (Jeremiah) M. (I87O - I9UI) - m. (1) Belle Smith (clfiyo - I896); (2) 

Minnie ( ? - ? ). Son of Jesse and Mary A. Burk. Laborer in and near 

Defiance, Ohio. Children: (1) Arnold B.; (2) None. 

8. Jess L. (1909 - m. (1) Martha Frutig (1906 - ; (2) Enid Steinmetz (cl910 - ; 
(3) Miriam Flagel (1913 - • Born in vicinity of Canton, Ohio. Sales-promotion 
work, Ford Motor Co., Detroit, Mich. Lives in Dearborn Heights, Mich. Children: 
Susan Bane (adopted). 

5. Jesse (cl825 - 190?) - m. (1) Eliza Weaver (cl83U - I868); (2) Mary A. Burk (l8U9 

- 1935). Son of (John) Philip and Mary Ann Guest. Born in Pike Twp., Stark Co., 
Ohio and raised in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co. Farmer and laborer, Flatrock 
Twp., Henry Co. and Highland Twp., Defiance Co., Ohio. Civil War veteran - Priv. 
Co. B, l8Uth Ohio Inf. Children: (l) John P., Elizabeth A. (Burk), Mary E. (Glass) 
Isaac Andrew; (2) Jeremiah (Jerry), Lucia M. (Wallace), Joseph, (Mary ?) Amanda 
(Clapsaddle or Baldwin), James W., Charles H., Abram A. (Abe), George Albert. 

6. Jesse Valentine (18?? - m. (l) Fannie Cooper (1879 - ; (2) Annabelle Mocherman 

(Kohlenberger-Calvin-Bordner) (I88O - . Son of David M. and Mary J. Rennecker. 
Farmer, Flatrock Twp., Henry Co., Ohio. Retired in Montpelier, Ohio (Williams 
Co.). Children: (l) Burdette David, Bernice (Fritsch); (2) None. 

5. Jessias (Jesse) (I823 - 1900) - m. Sarah Reed (I83I - 190U) 

Son of John P. and Sarah Bordner. Farmer in Perry Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. Children 
Jonathan V., William Henry, Anna (Fromra), Emma (Rogers), Amanda (Lohr), Finley 
Benton, Sophia (Hensel), Daniel Webster, Arthur Clinton, Ella V. (Snyder). 

John (also see Jonathan, Jack, Jon, Johnson, Johnie) 

15U 



. 



PART B - REGISTER CF BOHDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

3. John (1758 - l8l2) - m. Susanna (cl765 - l8lii) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Bait. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Farmer in l^- 
per Paxton Tvp. (part now in Mifflin Twp.), Dauphin Co., Pa. In Pennsylvania 
militia in Revolutionary War. Children: Eva Elizabeth (Weiss), Anna Maria (Mary 
- Heller), Peter, Susanna, John, Susanna, Elizabeth; possibly others, names un- 
known, who died in childhood. 

li. John (1786 - l81;8) - m. Elizabeth Hoffman (1786 - l86__) 

Son of Jacob and Anna Maria Brosz. Farmer, Bethel Tt^., Berks Co., Pa. Inherited 
part of his father's farm acquired from the Proprietors, Richard and Thomas Penn. 
Children; Daniel, Thomas, David, Sarah (Wagner ?), Jonathan, Elizabeth (Klinger), 
Jacob. 

U. John (1793 - ? ). Died young. Son of John and Susanna , Dauphin Co., Pa, 

U. John (1799 - 1880) - m. Barbara Caninger (l800 - l88l) 

Son of Hexuy and Susanna Alburt. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp.,Northuii4)erland Co., 
Pa. Farmer in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio; Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co. and Flat- 
rock Twp., Henry Co., Ohio. Children: Jacob, Margaret (Hillard or Nye), William, 
Daniel, Susanna (Harman), Henry, David Monet. 

U. John (1803 - 180__). Son of Balthaser and Magdalena Emerich, Northuniber. Co., Pa, 

5. John (1807 - 1890) - m. Susanna Wenger (I8II - I876) 

Son of Jacob and Elizabeth Kern. Farmer and constable. Bethel Twp., Berks Co., 
Pa. Children: Elizabeth (Gassert), John, Susanna, Jacob. 

h. John (1810 - 1828). Son of William and Elizabeth Koppenheffer, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

5. John (1813 - 1869) - m. (1) Susanna Ramberger (l8lit - 18^5); (2) Rachael Ramberger 
(1809 - cl880). Son of Peter and Margaret Nuvinger. Farmer in l^per Paxton Twp. 
and Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Children; (l) Elizabeth (Hempel ?), John W., 
(William) Henry Harrison; (2) David R., George Irvin. 

S. John (Jonathan) (l8l5 - cl81;3) - m. Margareth ^ (cl8l$ - 7 ) 

Son of Jacob and Maria . Laborer and miner in Wiconisco and lykens Twps., 

Dauphin Co., Pa. Children; Henry, Elizabeth, Jacob, Angelina, Catharine. 

5. John (1816 - 1896) - m. (l) Catharine Miller (l8l9 - 187_); (2) lydia (cl826 -?) 
Son of Godfrey and Sarah Gasser. Born in Bethel Twp., B^rks Co., Pa. Toaster car- 
penter and cabinet-maker in East Hanover Twp. and Derry Twp., Dauphin Co,, Pa, 
and in North Londonderry Twp. and Palnyra, Lebanon Co., Pa. Children; (l) 
William Henry, Jerome M. , (Sarah Ann) Elizabeth (Hepkins), Charles Fremont 
(Fremont Charles), Ida C. (Lesky or Lesley), Helen; (2) None. 

5. John (1818 - ? ) Died young. Son of Jacob and Catharine Lerch, Bethel, Pa. 

5. John (1819 - I89U) - m. Sarah Shade (I828 - 1901) 

Son of George and Catharine Caninger. Born in Pike Twp., Stark Co,, Ohio; raised 
in Pike Twp. and in Knox Co. Farmer, Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co. and Florence 
Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. Children: Albert; possibly others, names unknown, who 
died young. 

5. John (I82U - 1871) - m. Margaret Fishel (1828 - 1903) 

Son of Jacob Bortner and Susanna Schneider. Changed his name to "Bordner". Shoe- 
maker and farmer, Hopewell Twp., York Co,, Pa. Children: Mary (Reddiford), 
Jacob F., Williams., John David W., Sarah Belle, Franklin (Frank) Elmer. 



PART B - REGISTER OF BO HDNER MA LES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. John (1827 - 1902) - m. Lavina Whary (I83U - 1931) 

Son of Jonathan and Leah Kiehl. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Carpenter, Shamokin, Pa. (Northujnberland Co.) Children: Harriet S. (Osnian), 
(Benjamin) Henry, Margaret, Elizabeth J. (Kline), Ella (Hill), John Augustus 
Albert. 

6. John (1838 - 1906) - m. Diana Peiffer (cl839 - 1916) 

Son of John and Susanna Wenger. Laborer in Bethel T-wp., Berks Co. and Bethel T-wp, 
Lebanon Co., Pa. Children: Addison, Emma E„ (Shell), Jonathan Peiffer, Percida 
(Bohn), Ida S. (Zeigler), Catharine J. (Umholtz), Amanda (Thompson), Jacob. H., 
Milton S., Harvey. 

5. John (18U9 - 1929) - m. Catherine Ann Dohmer (cl859 - 1922) 

Son of Isaac and Magdalena Eyster. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland 
Co., Pa. Farmer, York Twp., Elkhart Co., Ind. (near Bristol). Children: John 
Sercnus, William Henry, George Emanuel, Ida Elizabeth (Miller), Mabel Bernice 
(Pullen). 

6. John (1887 - 19?6) - m. Clara M. Bressler (Inch) (cl891 - 

Son of Isaac and Harriet Reichenbach. Farmer in Point Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. No children. 

7. John (cl890 - cl900). Son of Richard R. and Lillie L. Burd, Northumberland, Pa. 

8. John (1908 - 1909). Son of Thomas D. and Emma R. Meek, Berks Co., Pa. 

8. John (cl910 - . Unmarried. 

Son of John Sherman and Stella F. Anglin. Probably born in vicinity of Washing- 
ton, D. C. Musician. Last known to be living in Atlanta, Ga. 

7. John (1915 - 1915). Son of John A. A. and Florence M, Robinson (Griffith), 

Shamokin, Pa. 

10. John (cl960 - . Son of John F. and Rita Kramer, Wiconisco, Pa. 

10. John (1962 - . Son of Robert W. and Bonna M. Savage, Crittenden, N. Y. 

8. John A. (1901 - 1901). Son of Addison and Rebecca Shaeffer, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

6. John Adam (I8U8 - 192h) - m. (l) Elizabeth Hawk (l85l - l879);(2) Catharine Hawk 

(cl850 - 1898). Son of Jacob nnd Maria Snyder. Born in Wiconisco Twp., Dauphin 
Co., Pa. Farmer in Halifax Twp., Jackson Twp., and Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., 
and near Lancaster, Pa. Children: (l) Jacob Milton, Edward, Mary Jane(Balsbaugh), 
William Harvey, Anna Elizabeth (Bettinger); (2) Viola Rebecca (Patterson), Mar- 
garet Cora (Miller), Minnie Sara (Schomber or Schomper - Warner or Werner). 

7. John Amendon (I88O - 1882). Son of Jacob M. and Ellen Hain, Bernville, Pa. 

6. John Augustus Albert (l875 - I960) - m. (l) Teressa 0. Martz (cl879 - 1965); (2) 
Florence May Robinson (Griffith) (I89O - I967). Son of John and Lavina Whary. 
Contractor and builder, Shamokin and Elysburg, Pa. (Northumberland Co.) Children: 
(1) Daisy (Ferster), Florence (Chamberlain); (2) John, Russell, Stella La Rue 
(Ruby - Pianis), Bertha Jean (Moyer), Eloise Grace (Martini). 

156 



I 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. John Benjamin (1909 - in. Elina Bothomley (1911 - 

Son of Gvy D. and Vinnie M, Woodman. Bank cashier, insurance agent, and real- 
estate broker. Burr Oak, Mich. Children; Gary Lee. 

7. John C. (1866 - 1937) - m. Amy Dietz (1872 - 1937) 

Son of Daniel M. and Martha Patten. Born in Buckeye Tvp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
Farmer near Monroe, Wise. Children: Carl and one other son said to have died in 
World War I (name unknown). In addition, the following, who had lived at one 
time with the family, changed their names to •*Bordner'*, although not legally 
adopted: Ralph Edward, Edna (Stieg). 

7. John Calvin (I87I - 19U8) - m. Margaret Etnoyer (1872 - 1958) 

Son of Daniel J.K. and Hufina Lerch. Bom in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Onetime 
hostler, and later auctioneer in Ityerstown, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). Children: Ruth 
Rufina (Good), Estella Margaret (Holtzman), Edith Catherine (Simes), Mildred 
Etna (Wolff). 

7. John Charles (Ryan) (l875 - 1950) 

Son of David R. and I^^dia A. Bonawitz. Originally named "Tlarry E. Bordner". 
Changed his name to "John Charles Ryan", when he ran away from home as a youth. 
Lived in Bay City and Huron Co., Mich, and later in Cleveland, Ohio and Detroit, 
Mich. Great-lakes steamship captain. Children all named "I^an". 

8. John Charles (1925 - m. Wbnona ^yatt (1928 - 

Son of Ray B. and Edith S. Dietz. Born in or near Herndon, Pa. (Northumberland 
Co.), Dentist, Long Beach, Calif. Children: Susan Bane (adopted), John Scott. 

9. John Charles (196U - . Son of Gary L. and Cynthia J. Sharp, Glastonbury, Conn. 

8. John Clayton (cl9l5 - m. Rummel (cl9l5 - 

Son of John W. and Mary Ann Shutt. Bom in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Machinist, Millersburg, Pa. (Daiqshin Co.). Children: Harold. 

9. John D. (1955 - . Son of Ernest A. and Alice J. Bordner, Harrisburg, Pa, 

7. John David (I88I - I96I) Unmarried. 

Son of David R. and Lydia A. Bonawitz. Farmer, Colfax Twp., Huron Co., Mich. 

8. John David (l897 - m. Carrie Stare (cl900 - 

Son of Jonathan P. and Emma Merkey. Bom in North Annville Twp., Lebanon Co., 
Pa. Life-insurance underwriter, Hummelstown, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). No children. 

6. John David W. (l856 - 1922) - m. Elsie Ehrhart (1855 - ? ) 

Son of John and Margaret Fishel. Born in Hopewell Twp., York Co., Pa. School 
teacher in early life. Fish merchant, Baltimore, Md, Children: Donald Eranius. 

6. John E. (1857 - 19liO) - m. Catherine E. Friend (cl860 - 1931) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Coler. Bom in Flatrock Twp., Henry Co., Ohio. Farmer 
in Florence Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. Children: Cloyd Ellsworth, Howard Elwood, 
Ralph Leroy, Ethel (Willoughby) . 



157 



PART B - REGISTE R O F BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. John E. (1391 - 196?) - m. Mame Snyder (lB92 - 1965) | 7 

Son of Ira F. and Elizabeth Miller. Plumber, Wiconisco, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Child- 
ren: Helena (Lebo), John Franklin. 



8. John E. (1955 - . Son of Elwood B, and Emily Graham, Pennsauken, N. J. 

9. John Edward (19U8 - • Son of Maurice and Loretta Brenneman, Canton, 111. 

8. Jolin Elmo (1921 - . Son of Dayton A, and Telsa K. Taylor, Marietta, 111. 

8. John Eugene (1930 - m. Helen Curtas (1930 - 

Son of Clyde E. and Emily C. Mettie. Salesman, Toledo, Ohio. Children: Joan M., 
Carol A., Linda S., Elaine M. 



1 



7. John (Jonathan) F. (I87U - 1956) Unmarried. 

Son of Alfred and Harriet G. Scrivener. Born in Fulton Co., 111. Farmer near J i 
Bedford, Iowa (Taylor Co.). 



: 



7. John F. (1890 - 1890). Son of Daniel W. and Sarah J. Hoffman, Northumberland Co., 
Pa. 



6. John Franklin (I889 - m. (l) Bertha T. Renn (cl889 - ; (2) Sula Catherine Bick- 

hart (1892 - 1959); (3) Margaret H. Guffy (1906 - . Son of Frederick M. and 5, 
Matilda S. McCurtain. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa. Car- 
penter, Northumberland, Pa. Children: (l) None; (2) Henry Milton, Paul Franklin, 7 
Grace Romaine (McCarthy); (3) None. jj 

7. John Franklin (1911 - m. Ida Mabel Souder (1900 - ■ 

Son of David A. and Hettie A. Klinger. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. Candy-maker, Hershey, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). No children. il j^ 

9. John Franklin (cl928 - m. Rita Kramer (cl928 - 

Son of John E, and Mame Snyder. Plumber, Wiconisco, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Children; 1 -i 
Marilyn, Rita, John, Jeffrey. 

3. John G. (I9li6 - . Son of George P. and Eleanor M. Lavin, Kutztown, Pa. 

6. John George (l895 - . Son of (Lucius) Oliver and Lucy D. Snyder. Unmarried. 

Railroad telegrapher and truck-farmer near Omaha, Nebr. Now in Veterans' Hos- 
pital, Grand Island, Nebr. 

7. John Godfrey (1906 - m. Hester Donaldson (1909 - 

Son of William A. and Minetta G. Lambing. Born in Westmoreland Co., Pa. Con- 
struction foreman, Baltimore, Md. Veteran World War II - U. S. Army - Sgt. No 
children. 



1 



6. John H. (1876 - rl937) - in. Mary E. Heintzelman (cl878 - ? ) 

Son of William and Mary Derrick. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Lived in Sunbury, Pa. (Northumberland Co.). Children: William Oscar, Polly 
B. (Lauer); perhaps others, names unknown. 

6. John H. (cl880 - . Son of Benjamin and Sarah Rose, Northumberland Co., Pa. 

Died in infancy. ., 

15° 



P ART B - REG IS TER OF BORD NER MALE S AND T HEIR FAMILIES 

7. John H. (cl880 - ? ) Probably died young. Son of Jerome M. and Mary A. Horstick, 
Palniyra and Collegeville, Pa. (Last record ial896.) 

7. John H. (1909 - m. Florence A. Glace (191U - 

Son of Dorsey A. and Maude A. Lubold. Born in Washington Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Lives in Port Trevorton, Pa, (Snyder Co.). Children: Marian (Row). 

7. John Harvey (I88O - I966) - m. Luiza Enriques Carpio (I88O - cl960) 

Son of William H. and Anna E. Herr. Bom in Akron, Ohio. Spanish-American War 
veteran - Co. A, 27th U. S. Inf. Ovmed and operated a cocoanut and rice planta- 
tion near Zamboanga, Philippine Islands, where he remained after discharge from 
Army. Children: Pedro Carpio, Juan Carpio, Matilde (Escudero), Josephine (Infante). 

7. John Harvey (I89I - 1892). Son of Homer and Mary E. Blackaby, Fulton Co., 111. 

6. .fohn Henry (I83U - 1855)- Son of Daniel and Anna M. Tobias, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

6. John Henry (I867 - 1939) - m. Emma M. Deck (1873 - 195U) 

Son of Thomas L. and Melinda Schneider. Laborer, Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
Auctioneer, Kutztown, Pa. (Berks Co.). Children: Edna, William Thomas, Cora 
(Fries), Robert, Mary (Groves), George Peter, Lillian, Lester Francis, Harry. 

6. John Henry (I867 - l873) - Son of William and Sarah Ann Snyder, Whitley Co., Ind. 

7. John Henry (l87^ - 19Uh) - m. Rachel Emaline Shoop (I878 - 193U) 

Son of Daniel and Amanda Rummel. Farmer in Jefferson Twp., Halifax Twp., and 
Jackson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: Lulu Frances (Sheaffer), Iva Alverta 
(Spahr), Verna May, Esther Irene, Mary Amanda (Rudy - Corap), Clyde Edward. 

7. John Henry (l875 - ? ). Son of John M. and Ella M. , Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 

May have died young. 

7. John Hillery (1910 - m. (1) Name unknown; (2) Mable Marie Boney (1926 - 

Son of Albert L. and Cora I. Roberts. Carpenter, De Soto, Tex. (Dallas Co.). 
Children: (l) John Hillery Jr., Johnie V. (Halley); (2) Barbara Jean, Linda Jane. 

8. John Hillery Jr. {1932 - 1936). Son of John Hillery, De Soto, Tex. 

5. John J. (cl859 - 1935) - m. Ella (Snyder) (cl860 - I898) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine Shutt (Miller). Oil-well driller, shoe repairman, in 
and near Portage, Ohio (Wood Co.). Children: Essie May. 

7. John Jacob (I883 - 196U) Unmarried. 

Son of Cyrus P. and Emma R. Troutman. Bom in Upper Tulpehocken Twp., Berks Co., 
Pa. Farmer near Turtle Lake, N. D. 

9. John Jacob (1925 - m. Louetta Ellen Beard (1925 - 

Son of Jacob J. and Katie I. Scholl. Bom in Joliett, Pa. (Schuylkill Co.). 
Estimator for a general contractor, Lemoyne, Pa. (Cumberland Co.). Veteran 
World War II - U. S. Air Corps. Children: Monte Lynn, John Jeffrey, Bradford 
Earl. 

10. John Jeffrey (1950 - . Son of John J. and Louetta E. Beard, Lemoyne, Pa. 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNSR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. John M. (1850 - 1912) - m. Ella M. (1852 - 190?) ., 

Son of Jacob and Hannah Snyder. Cigar-maker, Bethel, Berks Co., Pa. Children: j 
John Henry, CarrieE.(Rhine) . I 

6. John M. (cl860 - cl86l). Son of Percival and Lovina Miller, Bethel Twp., Berks Co., | 
Pa. 

6. John P. (1802 - 1878) - m. (l) Sarah Bordner (l805 - I876); (2) Sophia Weiteman I 
(cl85h - 1917). Son of Peter and Catharine Katterman. First wife, daughter of 
Henry Bordner and Susanna Alburt. Originally named simply "John", he added "P" 
(for Peter, his father) to aid in distinguishing him from a cousin named "John". 
Born in Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Farmer and carpenter. Pike Twp. and Beth- 
lehem Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. Children: (l) Jessias, Anna Eliza (Snively), John 
VJashington, Haman, Harriet (Alexander), Elias, Catharine, Levi, Aaron, Daniel, 
William, Maria (Weidman), Joseph Franklin. (2) Wilson W. , Fremont W. Also 
adopted son of his daughter, Harriet (Alexander), James Monroe. 

6. John P. (1856 - 1895) Unmarried 

Son of Jesse and Eliza Weaver. Defiance, Ohio. 

9. John Paul (19U8 - . Son of Winfred P. and Katherine E. Dudtenhoefer, Decatur, 111. 

9. John Paul (196U - . Son of Earl E. and Betty B. Sharp, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

h. John Philip (1793 - ? )• Died young. Son of William and Elizabeth Koppenheffer, 
Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 

7. John R. (1916 - Unmarried. 

Son of William W. and Margaret A, Lyons. Born in Butte, Mont. Former railroad 
man. Later, traveling representative. Association of American Railroads, Denver, 
Colo. 

8. John Rhodes (1928 - m. (l) Anita Speck (cl930 - ; (2) Louise Rex (cl930 - ; 

(3) Ellen Punchon (cl930 - . Son of Paul W. and Marie A. Spiegelhalter. Born » 
in Altoona, Pa. Owns and operates a specialty store in New Hope, Pa. (Bucks Co.). 

Children: (l) None; (2) Paul; (3) None. ' 

i 

9. John Scott (1962 - . Son of John C, and Wonona Hyatt, Long Beach, Calif. j 

I 

6. John Serenus (1877 - 1959) - m. Stanta Dora Lung (1885 - 

Son of John and Catharine Ann Dohmer. Born in York Twp., Elkhart Co., Ind. Farm- 
er and agricultural agent, and later Director of Land Economics, Wisconsin State 
Agricultural Dep't., Madison, Wise. Children: Jean (Kern), Virginia Catherine 
(Martinson). Widow lives in Madison, Wise. , 

7. John Sherman (I86U - 19U5) - m. (l) Ida Moore (cl870 - cl890); (2) Name unknown; 

(3) Stella F. Anglin (cl875 - ? ). Son of Daniel T. and Sarah Weaber. Born in 
Union Twp., Lebanon Co., Pa. Salesman and later a glass manufacturer, Washington, 
D. C; Charlotte, N. C; Atlanta, Ga. Children: (l) Ethel (Wohlson), Ann (Herrick) 
Dorothy (Ruess); (2) None; (3) John, Evelyn. 

8. John Thomas (1950 - . Son of Robert J. and Lola D. Fisher, Cutler, Ind. 

160 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. John W. (cl8U0 - 1916) - m. (l) IsabeUa (Susan) Whitman (l81;5 - cl875); (2) 

Mary C. Bowers (1858 - 19U0). Son of John and Susanna Ramberger. Born in Upper 
Paxton Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Laborer and pig-castrator, Jackson Twp., Dauphin 
Co., Pa. Children: (l) William J., Ira Franklin; (2) Harris C, Walter Jay, 
Mary Esther (Klinger), J. Allen. 

6. John W. (1895 - m. rfyrtle V. Krouse (l895 - 

Son of Jeremiah C, and Matilda D. Snyder. Born in Washinton Twp., Northumberland 
Co., Pa. Car repairman, Sunbury, Pa. and Erlton, N. J. Children: Blwood B., 
Irene (Russian). 

8. John W. (1962 - 1965). Son of Paul D. and Mary G.R. Herb, near Herndon, Pa. 

8. John Warren (19U6 - . Son of Russell D. and Beulah M. Snyder, near Bolivar, Ohio. 

5. John Washington (1827 - 1908) - m. Sarah E. Stigner (l81;0 - 1900) 

Son of John P. and Sarah Bordner. Farmer and carpenter in Bethlehem Twp., Stark 
Co., Ohio and in Perry Twp. and Sparta Twp., Noble Co., Ind. Children: Frances 
Almira (Wells), David Franklin (Frank), Charles W., Albert S., Otis E., Alta B. 
(Peffer), Joseph, Florence Leona (Peffer). 

6. John Wesley (1856 - 1926) Unmarried. 

Son of Peter and Nancy J. Shortnes. Born in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. 
Farmer near De Soto, Tex. (Dallas Co.). 

7. John Wesley (I876 - 19li7) - m. Mary Ann Shutt (cl88l - ? ) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Matter. Bom in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Laborer 
and miner, likens Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: Elmer C, Ellen Mary (Yeager), 
Mabel A. (Ulsh), John Clayton. 

8. John Westbrook (1927 - m. Germaine Chuckla (1927 - 

Son of Arleigh E, and Lela M. Westbrook. Born in Blue Island, 111. General fore- 
man, automobile plant, Indianapolis, Ind. Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy. No 
children. 

10. John Wilbur (19li6 - . Son of Roy E, Jr. and June F. Ballettee, Harrisburg, Pa. 

8. John William (1911 - m. Elizabeth Budrecki (cl920 - 

Son of Donald E. and Regina Kines. Bom in Baltimore, Md. Textile chemist, 
Clifton and Oxford, N. J. Veteran of World War II - U. S, Maritijne service - 
Lt. Children} Barbara Elizabeth. 

8. John William (cl930 - 1956) - m. Joan Marie Martz (cl93U - 

Son of William B. and Bertha Keifer. Laborer, Danville, Pa. (Montour Co.). No 
children. 

9. Johnie V. (19U2 - . Son of John Hillery and , Houston, Tex. Name changed 

to "Halley" when mother remarried. 

6. Johnson Per Lee (John) (1879 - ? ) - m. Jane Oliver Stokes (I883 - 195U) 

Son of William and Mary C. Keller. Railroad engineer. Canton, Ohio. Disappeared 
from home. Children: James Stokes, George William, Paul John. 

9. Jon Benton (I9li0 - . Son of Delmar J.B. and Martina Brenner, Massillon, Ohio. 
Graduate student. University of California. 

Jonathan (also see John, Jack) 

161 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. Jonathan (I806 - 187_) - m. Name unknown 

Son of Peter and Margaret Nuvinger. Carpenter and builder in Mifflin Twp., Dau- 
phin Co., Pa. and elsewhere in Pa. Children: Margaret (Baker), Mary F.; perhaps 
others, names unknown. 

h. Jonathan (I8O6 - I887) - m. Leah Kiehl (l809 - 1877) 

Son of Balthaser and Magdalena Emerich. Farmer and carpenter in Lower Mahanoy 
Twp., Northumberland Co., Pa. Children: (?) Anthony, John, Emanuel, Catharine 
(Dutry), (Mary) Elizabeth (Heckert), Louisa (Lahr), William, Sarah Ann, Leah 
(Tressler), Amanda Corlina (Daniel). 

5. Jonathan (I8I6 - I89I) - m. Catharine^ (I826 - 1901) 

Son of John and Elizabeth Hoffman. Farmer in Bethel Twp,, Berks Co., Pa. Civil 
War veteran - Priv. Co. I, 177th Pa. Inf. Children: Mary, Melinda Elizabeth, 
Cassia Maria, Alice Jane (Foltz), Morris Calvin, Elizabeth Valeria (Sensing). 

5. Jonathan (I816 - 1873) - m. Lucinda Bearce (l823 - l897) 

Son of (George) Peter and Christiana Losh. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northum- 
berland Co., Pa. Also lived in Mifflin Twp,, Dauphin Co., Pa. and Hopewell Twp,, 
Licking Co., Ohio. Farmer in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Children: Harvey 
P., Alfred, Christiana (Weirauch), Eda, Sarah E. (Fitzhenry), John Franklin 
(Frank), Homer, Amanda J. (Burleigh), Emma T. (Weirauch), Mary L. (Miller), 
Hattie (Hufford), Eva H. (Breckinridge). 

5. Jonathan (cl8?9 - 1903) - m. Mary (Sarah ?) Mace (cl836 - 1912) 

Son of Philip and Readle. Born in Dauphin Co., Pa. Farmer and miller in 

Stafford Twp. and Wilmington Twp., De Kalb Co., Ind. Moved to near Baldwin, Kans. 
for two years in l870's, but returned to Butler, Ind. (De Kalb Co.). Children; 
Bva E. (Turner - Kirkpatrick) , Frances A. (Plowe - Brandt), Charles Edward, 
Harry D., Ernest M., William Vfalter, Sarah E. 

9. Jonathan Kyle (195U - . Son of Craig M. and Dorothy Anderson, Quakertown, Pa. 

6. Jonathan Moyer (I8U0 - cl8h5). Son of Augustus L. and Henrietta (Harriet) Moyer, 

Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 

7. Jonathan Peiffer (I86I - 1930) - ra, Emma Merkey (I863 - 1953) 

Son of John and Diana Peiffer. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Cigar-maker 
in Lebanon and Hummelstown, Pa. (Dauphin Co. and Lebanon Co.). Children: Cora 
(Bartel), Robert, Oscar Elias, Mary A. (Walters - Forney), John David, Allen W. , 
Alice Leah (Zimmerman - Naugle). 

6. Jonathan V. (cl852 - 1917) - m. (l) Cora Van Horn (l858 - 1907); (2) Bertha Holl 
(Snyder) (18^8 - ? ). Son of Jessias and Sarah Reed. Farmer in Shawnee Twp. 
Allen Co. and Perry Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. Children: Homer E., Jason E., Blanche 
(Douglas). 

h. Joseph (1819 - I863) - m. Susanna (Susan) Michael (I8I8 - 1873) 

Son of Balthaser and Magdalena Emerich. Farmer in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. Children: Henry, Catharine (Klock), Susanna (Shappell), Sarah Ann, 
and three other children who died in infancy (names unknown). 

162 



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J 

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PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Joseph (187U - 196U) - ra. Neva Smith (cl880 - ? ) 

Son of Jesse and Mary A. Burk. Laborer around Holgate, Ohio (Henry Go.) for many 
years; then went to Galifornia. No children. 

6. Joseph (1876 - 1936) - m. Gertrude Elenor Vandegriff (I89O - 19U3) 

Son of John Washington and Sarah E. Stigner. Bom near Ligonier, Ind. Farmer near 
Kimmel, Ind, (Noble Co.). Children: Leona Beatrice (Rowe), Dorothy Mae (Hasselman), 
Grace Elenor (Nott), Leonard Lester, Weldon Richard, Geraldine Rose (Messner). 

10. Joseph Alan (1953 - . Son of Jack E. and Ruby M. Deardorff , Kokomo, Ind. 

7. Joseph Clark (1918 - m. Betty Lou Piper (1915 - 

Son of Fielden A. and Minnie A, Templeton. Born in Wichita, Kans. Office manager 
and purchasing agent in metal warehouse, Indianapolis, Ind. Also lived in Chicago 
and Clovis, N. M. Veteran World War II - U. S. Arny. Children: Joseph Clark II. 

8. Joseph Clark II il9hU - » Son of Joseph C. and Betty L. Piper, Indianapolis, Ind. 

7. Joseph F. (1879 - 1879). Son of Jacob and Sarah Matter, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

5. Joseph Franklin (l850 - 193U) - m. Eugenia Caroline (Pat) Keller (i860 - I9UI) 
Son of John P. and Sarah Bordner. Born in Bethlehem Twp., Stark Coo, Ohio. 
Farmer and later, concrete contractor, Canton, Ohio and Perth and Wichita, Kans. 
Children: Fielden Aaron, Hortense (Benson), Maude M. (Sims). 

5. Josiah (Cyrus) (l827 - 1903) - m. Harriett Brillhart (I836 - 1921) 

Son of George and Catharine Caninger. Born in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohioj raised 
in Knox Co. and Crawford Co. Farmer in Superior Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. Child- 
ren: Alice A} parhaps others, names unknown. 

5. Josiah (cl852 - cl919) - m. Mary (cl860 - ? ) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine Shutt (Miller). Farmer in Liberty Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. 
No Children, 

8. Juan Carpio (1906 - m. Regina Limen (1912 - 

Son of John H. and Luiza E. Carpio, Zamboanga, Philippine Islands. Children: 
Pacita, James, Edward, Reuben, Grace, Mildred, Dolly. 

8. Julian (19U5 - . Son of Elza B. and Marguerite L. Carmane, Republic, Ohio. 

8. Kane George (1932 - m, Madeline Margaret Hanson (1933 - 

Son of Arnold B. and Coletta J, Curtzwiler. Born in Toledo, Ohio. Abstractor, 
Phillips Petroleum Co., Omaha, Nebr. 2nd Lt. in U. S. Air Force, four years, in- 
cluding Korean War period. Children: Renne Denice, Stephen Kane. 

Karl (also see Carl) 

8. Karl Alkire (1903 - m. Mary E. Miller (1908 - 

Son of Ira J. and Kathryn D. Alkire. Owns and operates Bordner Lumber Company, 
Brookston, Ind. (business founded by grandfather, Augustus S.). Children: 
Betty Joan, Suzanne (Gustat). 

163 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES I 

8. Karl McClellan (1921 - m. Helen Irene Downer (1925- 

Son of McClellan N. and Helen L. McComb. Cabinet-maker, Toledo, Ohio; Blissfield, 
Mich.; and Ruskin, Fla. Children: Karleen Diane, David Rene', Rosalie Ellen, 
Viilliain Robert. Adopted - Sharon Lee Robison (Frye). 

9. Karl Wilbur (19U0 - Unmarried. 

Son of Samuel D. and Violet Wilhelm. Public accountant, Palnyra, Pa, (Lebanon Co.). 

9. Keith Allen (i960 - . Son of Galen E. and Marcella J. Wagner, Selinsgrove, Pa. 
9. Keith Allen (1963 - . Son of Paul G. and Shirley A. Schumacher, Columbus, Ohio. 
9. Kelly Jean (l96l - . Son of Lawrence E. and Karen S. Miller, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



8. (Richard) Kenneth (1908 - m. Mildred Elizabeth Cook (I9l6 - 

Son of Roy J. and Margaret England. Bom in Brookston, Ind. Telephone lineman. 
Ft. Wayne, Kokomo, and Albion, Ind. Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy. No 
children. 

8. Kenneth (1917 - m. Alice Vogel (1920 - 

Son of Homer A. and Jessie Hilton. Born in Putnam Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Farmer 
near Morrison, 111. (Whiteside Co.). Children: Jane, Mary, Beth, Barbara, Charles. 

9. Kenneth (cl9U5 - • Son of Wilson E. and Connie Ward. Born in Seattle, Wash. In 

U. S. Navy. 

9. Kenneth (cl950 - . Son of Robert F., Alameda, Calif. 

10. Kenneth Allen (I96l - . Son of Charles A. and Elsie I. Woll, Enola, Pa. 

9. Kenneth Burrel (1910 - m. Veronica M. Kohlbeck (190U - 

Son of Chester R. and Cora L. Keister. Born in Rock Grove, 111. Post-office clerk 
in Cypress, Calif. Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: Betty Ann (Bowes), 
Shirley Jane (Kerr). 

8. Kenneth C. (1950 - . Son of Paul D. and Mary G. R. Herb, near Herndon, Pa. 

9. Kenneth Edward (l9Ul - m. Elizabeth Bruce Carpenter (l9Ul - 

Son of Edward R. and Evelyn L.Immel. Born in Massillon, Ohio. Graduate student, 
Univ. of 'Mass. Lives in Hadley, Mass. No children. 

8. Kenneth Eugene (1911; - m. Ruth Elbertine Hively (I9l6 - 

Son of William A. and Edith M. Douglas. Born in Whitley Co., Ind. Railroad 
brakeman, near North Fairfield, Ohio (Huron Co.). Children: Barbara Lee (Eassitt). 

9. Kenneth John (1966 - . Son of Francis E. and Rachel A. Fairman, North Chicago, 111. 

9. Kenneth K. (1950 - . Son of Ernest A. and Alice J. Bordner, Harrisburg, Pa. 

7. Kenneth Leroy (1906 - m. Agnes Rosella Thormodsgard (1905 - 

Son of George E. and Edna M. Stutsman. Born in Union, Mich. Research consultant 
- land planning, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. Children: George Engert. 

I62i 



I 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Kenneth Merle (1937 - m. Barbara Ellen Burnett (19U0 - 

Son of Dalton D. and Pauline Clements. Sales engineer, Long Beach and Orange, 
Calif. Children: Carine Claire, Lisa Michele. 

8. Kenneth R. (1933 - m. Barbara Quadling (cl933 - 

Son of Richard T. and Marian E. Hoats. Lives in Cherry Hill, N. J. Children: 
Kenneth R., Kurt W., Kevin T. 

9. Kenneth R. Jr. (1957 - . Son of Kenneth Ro and Barbara Quadling, Cherry Hill, N.J. 

10. Kenneth Richard (19U7 - . Son of Jack E. and Ruby M. Deardorff, Kokomo, Ind. 
9. Kerry Jean (i960 - . Son of Donald E. and Olga J. Kozlow, Posen, 111. 

9. Kevin Bane (i960 - . Son of Glen W. and Juliana N. Bane, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

9. Kevin Robert (196U - . Son of Ned R. and Marian R. Jeffries, Toledo, Ohio. 

9. Kevin T. (1965 - . Son of Kenneth R. and Barbara Quadling, Cherry Hill, N. J. 

9. Kevin Wayne (196? - . Son of Lawrence E. and Karen S. Miller, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

9. Kim Robin (1955 - . Son of Richard L. and Margaretta E. Brosius, Herndon, Pa. 

9. Kurt W. (1959 - . Son of Kenneth R. and Barbara Quadling, Cherry Hill, N. J. 
Larry (also see Lawrence) 

8. Larry (I9h9 - . Son of Weldon R. and Toshiko Kado, Madison, Wise. 

9. Larry (cl950 - . Son of Carl J. and Gladys Carpenter, Battle Creek, Mich. 
9. Larry (1959 - . Son of Carl S. and Jean Neuschwander, Dakota, 111. 

8. Larry Dale (1938 - m. Gloria Marlene Landis (I9h0 - 

Son of Norman F. and Evelyn G, Kline. Salesman - baked goods, Sunbury, Pa. 
(Northumberland Co.). No children. 

9. Larry Edgar (1936 - m. Rita Joan Reinbold (cl936 - 

Son of Weldon La -Mar and Inez McDonald. Born in Montpelier, Ohio. In U. S. Air 
Force - Staff Sgt. Presently stationed in Hooper, Nebr. Children: Pamela Faye, 
Greig Alan. 

8. Larry Lee (1952 - . Son of Lloyd L. and Muriel E. Taylor, Sunbury, Pa. 

8. Larry Lyle (1955 - . Son of Lyle J. and Pearl Estes, Los Angeles, Calif. 

8. Larry Richard (l95l - . Son of Lawrence I. and Marjorie Rich, Canton, 111. 

10. Laurie (cl950 - . Son of Melvin C. and Viola R. Metz, probably Harrisburg, Pa. 
8. Lavon (1907 - 1908). Son of Harvey E. and Delia M. Wilson, Henry Co., Ohio. 

165 



PART B - REGISTER OF BQRDNER MIES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

Lawrence (also see Larry) 

8. Lawrence Elmer (1937 - m. Karen S. Miller (1938 - 

Son of Ora W. and Geraldine C. Snell. Plant-maintenance worker, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 
Children: Kelly Jean, Kevin Wayne. 

7. Lawrence I. (1909 - ra. Marjorie Rich (Reich) (191U - 

Son of Homer and Mary E. Blackaby. Born in Putnam Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Air- 
conditioning and refrigeration engineer. Canton, 111. (Fulton Co.). Veteran 
World War II - U. S. Army in Europe - Sgt. Children: Larry Richard, Larrilyn 
Louise. 

8. Lawrence Merrill (I898 - m. Phyllis J. Freidag (I898 - 

Son of Charles L. and Nettie B. Folgate. Co-founder and Pres., Bordner Mfg. Co., 
Inc., Freeport, 111. Born in Nodaway Co., Mo. Children: Elizabeth Louise (Lu- 
dolph), Lawrence Merrill Jr., Philip Charles, Robert Russell. 

9. Lawrence Merrill Jr. (1925 - m. Dorothy Mae Alexander (1925 - 

Son of Lawrence M. and Phyllis J. Freidag. Co-founder and Vice-Pres., Bordner 
Mfg. Co., Inc., Freeport, 111. Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Corps - 2nd Lt. 
Children: Lawrence Merrill III, Mary Elyse. 

10. Lawrence Merrill III (19U8 - . Son of Lawrence M. Jr. and Dorothy M. Alexander. 

7. Lawson (185U - I866). Son of George and Lovina Roush, Stephenson Co., 111. 

8. (Earl) Lee (1921; - m. Ruth Berneice Helle (1928 - 

Son of Dayton A. and Telsa K. Taylor. Born in Lewistown, 111. (Fulton Co.). 
Maintenance worker, near Smithfield, 111. Children: Gary Lee, George Allen. 

9. Lee Ardell (1952 - 1952). Son of Leonard A. and Mary J. Shaffer, Snyder Co., Pa. 

8. Lee Charles (l9hl - . Son of George N. and Helen M. Kratzer, Mt. Pleasant Mills, 
Pa. (Snyder Co.). In military service in Germany. 

8. Lee Taylor (1906 - m. Jenevieve Kopplekam (1913 - 

Son of Edward G. and Margaret A. Taylor. Born in St. Paul, Minn. Jja.\<yer, Los 
Angeles, Calif. Also lived in St, Paul, Minn, and Milwaukee, Wise. Children: 
Edward George. 

7. Leland Stanford (1895 - 1950) - m. Laura Woeppel (l39h - 

Son of Samuel T, and Emma Haidle. Lived in Pilger, Nebr. Children: Leland Stan- 
ford Jr. Widow lives in Pilger, Nebr. 

8. Leland Stanford Jr. (1922 - m. Katherine Chilcotte (cl925 - 

Son of Leland S. and Laura Woeppel. Lives in Pilger, Nebr. Veteran World War II 
- U. S. Navy - Chief Petty Officer. Children: Jane, Ann (both adopted). 

7. Leo Elmer (l897 - m. (l) Ruth Prange (1905 - ; (2) Jeannette Knott (190U - 1953). 

Son of Elza E. and Clara M. Ziegler. Truck driver, Richmond, Ft. Wayne, and 

Albion, Ind. Veteran World War I - U. S. Navy. Children: (l) Glen W. ; (2)Robert 

Lee, Ilene Ann (Spannagel). .. 

166 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MLES AND THKIR FAMILIES 

7. Leo Wilbur (189U - I89U). Son of Finley B. and Clara J. Krisher, Massillon, Ohio. 

8. Leonard Ardell (1929 - m. Mary Jane Shaffer (1935 - 

Son of George N. and Helen M. Kratzer, Shipping clerk in silk mill, Selinsgrove, 
Pa. (Snyder Co.). Children: Lee Ardell, Richard Eugene. 

8. Leonard Charles (I9h3 - . Son of Ralph O.and Mayme K. Bartlett, Tiffin, Ohio. 

7. Leonard Lester (1919 - m. Virginia Broward icl92$ - 

Son of Joseph and Gertrude E. Vandegriff. Born in Noble Co., Ind. In U. S. Air 
Force, including World War II and subsequently. Presently stationed at Sawyer 
Air Force Base, Mich. Children: Bernard Lee. 

7. Leonard Melvin (1910 - m. Ethel Brecht (Snyder) (1902 - 

Son of Roy C. and Nellie Walden. Farmer, Liberty Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. Now 
plant-maintenance employee, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio. 
No children. 

8. Leroy Ernest (19^6 - . Son of George N. and Helen M. Kratzer, Mt. Pleasant Mills, 

Pa. (Snyder Co.). In military service. 

6. Lester (1888 - 19U9) - m. Jennie Moyer (l893 - 

Son of Elijah and Susan Hossler. Born in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Farmer near Attica, Ohio (Seneca Co.). Children: Dorothy L. (Gangluff), Lucille 
(Stine), Virgil Lester, Rosemond (Kirkwood), Raymond Harold, Ellen (Cousino). 
VJidow lives in Attica, Ohio. 

8. Lester (1908 - Unmarried. 

Son of Sanford and Anna Beck. Born in Batavia, N. Y. Veteran World War II - U.S. 
Arn^. Now in a Veterans' Hospital in Mass. 

8. Lester (1938 - 1938). Son of Ralph 0, and Mayme K. Bartlett, Tiffin, Ohio. 

7. Lester Dale (1913 - 196U) - m. Rolene Long (Heller) (191U - 

Son of Ralph L. and Fern Hake. Farmer in Florence Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. 
No children. Widow lives near Edon, Ohio. 

8. Lester Eugene (1927 - m. (l) Ethel Warfel (cl927 - ; (2) Marie C. King (1928 - 

Son of Samuel A. and Rosa Yerges. Born in Halifax Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Tire- 
shop foreman, near Lewisberry, Pa. (York Co.). Veteran World War II - U. S. 
Navy. Children: (l) Cynthia Jean, %ron Eugene; (2) None. 

7. Lester Francis (cl910 - m. Estelle Steinrich (1917 - 

Son of John H. and Emma M. Deck. Born in Kutztown, Pa. (Berks Co.). Dep't. -store 
buyer and salesman. New York City. Lives in Caldwell, N. J. Veteran World War II 
- Military Gov't. Children: Gail Ellen. 

7. Lester J. (I903 - m. Lillie Mae Crook (l90h - 

Son of Elz.a E, and Clara M, Ziegler. Gas-station operator, Uniondale, Ind. (Wells 
Co.). Children: Jack Elza, Mabelou (Rogers). 

167 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOFaPNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. Levi (cl831 - 19X5) - m. Mary Bright (cl835 - ? ) 

Adopted son of Henry and Polly Behney. Originally named "Behney". Laborer in 
Stark Co. and Crawford Co., Ohio; Union Tvp., Elkhart Co., Ind.; Van Buren Twp., 
Kosciusko Co., Ind. and Nappanee, Ind. Children: Lydia Ann (Treich), Samuel 
Thomas, Mary Elizabeth (Treich-Hempfield), James, David Franklin (Frank). 

5. Levi (1838 - 1915) - m. Sarah Jane Spangler (l81;0 - 1927) 

Son of John P. and Sarah Bordner. Farmer in Perry Tvp., Stark Co., Ohio. Also 
lived in Canton, Ohio. Children: Adopted - Ida May (Reed - Blenford). 

5. Levi (1855 - 1911) - m. (l) Mary Jane Leister (cl860 - 1889); (2) Mary Jane Waller 

(1867 - 1920). Son of Jacob and Sarah Kocher. Farmer, Venice Twp. and Bloom Twp., 
Seneca Co. and near Tiro, Crawford Co., Ohio. Children: Marietta (Mary - Roth), 
Delia Edith (Shellhorn), Alpha Truly, Vernon Ellsworth, Ira Levi; (2) Pearl E. 
(Miller), Clyde McKinley, Tracy L., Osmar L., Helen L. (Altman). Also adopted son, 
Harry Cecil. 

6. Lewis (cl8U9 - ? ) - m. Name unknown 

Son of Moses and Maria A. Bearce. Farmer in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. and 
near Joplin, Mo. Children: Ira, George. 

7. (Elmer) Lloyd (I883 - 1962) - m. Zeta B. Mizner (I883 - 1953) 

Son of William H. & Adaline Gregg. Born in Burr Oak, Mich. Machinist in Detroit, 
Mich. Retired near Burr Oak, Mich. No children. 

8. Lloyd (1907 - m. (1) Mary C. Weaver (cl901 - cl930); (2) Daisy Estella Billman 

(1899 - . Son of Thomas E. & Mary S. Stoneroad. Laborer, Wiconisco, Pa. (Dauphin 
Co.). Also lived elsewhere in Dauphin Co., Schuylkill Co., and Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Children: (l) None; (2) Mertice, Ernest Edward. Also said to be father of 
of Sandra Lee (Ditzler) and Lloyd Carlos. 

9. Lloyd Carlos (cl9U0 - . Son of Lloyd Bordner, Wiconisco, Pa. 

7. Lloyd Ellsworth (I896 - 1926) - m. Opal Thelma Liggett (1900 - 

Son of Samuel T. & Ida L. Eby. Farmer near Tyner and Plymouth, Ind. and Dawson 
Springs, Ky. Veteran World War I - U. S. Army. Children: Robert William. Widow 
lives in Barstow, Calif. 

7. Lloyd Erwin (cl889 - 1956) - m. (l) Mary Ellen Bordner (Farnsworth) (IS9I - 1920); 
(2) Jennie C. Reigle (Knouse)(l895 - . Son of David A. and Hettie A. Klinger. 
First wife, daughter of Frederick M. and Matilda S. McCurtain. Both born in North- 
umberland Co., Pa. Farmer, fireman, and dye-works employee, near Herndon, Sunbury, 
and Hummels Wharf, Pa. Children{l)iarry Ervin, (Evelyn) Arlene (Byerly); (2) Lavail 
Mary (Neidig), Ralph Lloyd. Widow lives near Hummels Wharf, Pa. 

7. Lloyd Lee (1925 - m. Muriel Elizabeth Taylor (1922 - 

Son of Frank and Mary A. Blett. Born in Northumberland Co., Pa. Factory worker in 
Sunbury, Pa. (Northumberland Co.). Children: Larry Lee (adopted), April Kay. 

8. Lloyd P. (cl903 - 1953) - m. (l) Jennie M. Boltz (cl909 - ; (2)Elsie M. Schoffstall 

(cl910 - . Son of Jacob H. 4 Ida Weaver. Laborer and painter. Union Twp.. Leban- 
on Co., Pa. Also lived in Minersville, Pa. (Schuylkill Co.). Children: (l; Pearl 
(Jamison - Belleveau); (2) Robert George, Dorothy M. (Swalm) (perhaps others also). 

168 






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11. 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Lloyd Wilce (l88U - cl9U0) Unmarried 

Son of Aaron and Amanda Clark. Born in Seneca Co., Ohio. Railroad fireman. 
Lived in or near Montpelier, Ohio and Detroit, Mich. 

7. Logan Clarence (l892 - 1901) - m. (l) Kffie Stow (cl892 - ; (2) Clara Rosenthal 

(1896 - ; (3) Adeline D. Rollof (1913 - . Son of Franklin N. and Lulu H. Calvin. 
Born in Holgate, Ohio (Henry Co.)- Salesman, Grand Rapids, Ohio (Wood Co.)- Child- 
ren:(l) Fra nee s( Miller ) ; (2) and (3) None. Widow lives near Grand Rapids, Ohio. 

8. Logan Virgil (I9h2 - m. Name unknown 

Son of Virgil F, and Jennie Butler. Bom in Ohio. Lives in Jacksonville, Fla. 

8. Lowell Edward (1917 - m. (l) Rosalie Crider (cl917 - ; (2)Nova E. Evans (Wolf) 
(cl920 - . Son of Amza L. and Flossie E. Kaufman. Born near Plymouth, Ind. 
Operating Vice President, Indiana Motor Bus Co., South Bend, Ind. No children. 

8. Lowell Wayne (1930 - m. Anna Jeannine Bond (1932 - 

Son of Burdette D. and Ethel E, Hoffman. Industrial mechanic, near Holgate, Ohio 
(Henry Co.). Veteran Korean War - U, S. Air Force - Sgt. Children: David Wayne, 
Jeannine Joy. 

6. Lucius Albert (1851 - 1852). Son of George & Catharine Phillips, Williamsville, N.Y, 

8. (James) Luther Eugene (1921 - m. (l) Betty Mildred Wertz (cl925 - ; (2) Marie I. 
Casey (cl92U - . Son of Charles Edgar and Margaret L. Keefer. Born in Jefferson 
Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Machinist, Millersburg, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Children: 
(1) Timothy; (2) David, Michael. 

8. A. Lyle (1895 - 1932) - m. Gladys Kenyon (cl895 - 

Son of William L. and Retta H. Reisner. Born in Independence, Iowa. Upholsterer, 
Parkersburg and Dubuque, Iowa. Veteran Worl War I - U. S. Army. No children. 

7. Lyle James (1906 - m. Pearl Estes (1910 - 

Son of Oscar F. and Sylvia A. Dugan. Born in Daugherty, Iowa; also lived in Hugo, 
Okla. Captain, Los Angeles Fire Dept., Los Angeles, Calif. Children: Larry Lyle. 

8. Lyle Manley (1921 - m. Helen Elizabeth Green (1925 - 

Son of William H. and Bernice L. Brown. Born in Niles, Mich. Gas company worker 

(disabled), St. Petersburg, Fla. Lives in Pinellas Park, Fla. Veteran Vforld War 

II - U. S. Air Corps. Children: Lyle Manley, Raymond El] is, Linda Carol, Stephen 
Harold, Janet Marie, Jerry Lee. 

9. Lyle Manley Jr. (I9hl; - Unmarried 

Son of Lyle M. and Helen E. Green. Well-driller, Pinellas Park, Fla. 

7. Lyle Webb (I9OO - m. (l) Name unknown; (2) Faye Eding (1922 - 

Son of Frank and Laura Webb. Born in Le Roy, 111. Plant-maintenance supervisor, 
Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich. Now lives near Lake Odessa, Mich. 
Also lived in Amenia, N. D.; Bloomington, 111.; Mason and Holt, Mich. Children: 
(1) None; (2) Rodney, Terry Lyle. 

169 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOHDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

10. Lynn Alan (1950 - . Son of Delbert E. Jr. and Frieda F. Snyder, Toledo, Ohio 

7. Lynn Howard (I878. - 1950) Unmarried. 

Son of Israel J. and Nancy M. Cook. Luniber-yard employee, Brookston, Ind. (White 
Co.). Also Hved in Norfolk, Va. 

9. Marc Allen (1958 - . Son of Robert L. and Nancy A. Haberstroh, near Albion, Ind. 

7. Marcus Geary (I866 - I866) . Son of William H. and Anna E. Herr, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

6. (Francis) Marlon (1856 - 1912) - m. Martha Levingston (1857 - 19l8) 

Son of George Washington and Mary Ann Bolender. Farmer in Lewistovn T>ip,, Fulton 
Co., 111. and near Bennett, Colo. Children: William Washington, Florence, Jessie 
(Flanders), Gertrude (Skinner), Mary (Graham), Lola (Weidner-Fox), (Clarence) 
Paul. 

8. Marion (1928 - m. Barbara Jean Witt (1930 - 

Son of Homer A. and Jessie Hilton. Born in Lewistown, 111. (Fulton Co.) Owner 
of Mt. Morris Dry Goods Co., Mt. Morris, 111. Also lived in Canton, 111. No 
children. 

9. Mark Alan (i960 - . Son of Carl V. and Mary L. Bannister, Galesburg, 111. 

9. Mark Andrew (1963 - . Adopted son of Charles N. and Marcella M.Shady,Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

9. Mark David (1958 - . Son of Floyd L. and Helen R. Potts, Jonesville, Mich. 

8. Mark Ezra (I896 - 1897). Son of Harry D. and Alice M. Etschberger, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

7. Mark Henry (1399 - m. Elsie Roselle Kaufman (I898 - 

Son of Abram John and Survilla Osbom. Born in Henry Co., Ohio. Farmer, school 
teacher, and Township Trustee, Montpelier, Ohio. Veteran World War I - U. S, 
Amy. Children: Eileen A. (Mettler), Vincent K. 

6. Mark Wade (1879 - 1967) - m. Mary E. (Mamie) McKee (l877 - 1956) 

Son of Benjamin F. and Mary Dunlap. Bom in Fawn River Twp., St. Joseph Co., 
Mich. Carpenter and farmer, in and near Burr Oak, Mich. Children: Isabel 
(Hagadorn - Hettinger), Rhea (Keasey) . 

8. Marlin Le Roy (1912 - m. Matilda Mae MUler (cl917 - 

Son of Curtin E. and Elsie Snyder. Printer, Elizabethville, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 
No children. 

8. Marlin Van Buren (1916 - m, Kathryn Louise Nunes (1921 - 

Son of William H. and Lillie I. Gottschall. Born in Lancaster, Pa. Administrat- 
or, Economic Research and Development Commission, County of Hawaii, Hilo, Hawaii. 
Also lived in Reading, Kingston, and Carlisle, Pa. and Detroit, Mich. Children: 
Linda Faye, Claire Ann. 

8. Marlin William (1936 - m. Carol Ann Straw (1939 - 

Son of Roy E. and Elsie I. Wolf. Born in Herndon, Pa. (Northumberland Co.). 
General contractor, Dillsburg, Pa. Children: Richard Alan, Christine Yvonne. 



170 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. (Isaac) Martin (l899 - m. Gviendolene Evans (1905 - 

Son of Isaac A. and Mary J. Egner. Born in Shelby, Ohio. Salesman, Santa Barbara, 
Calif. Also lived in Pacific Grove, Los Gatos, Alhambra, and elsewhere in Calif. 
Veteran World War I - U. S. Army Aviation - Sgt. Children: Richard Evans, Miarylin 
Jean (Beasley). 

9. Martin Alan (l9Ul - . Son of Recil J. and Donna V. Lesnet, Colon, Mich. 

6. Martin Dorce (1895 - 1935) Unmarried 

Son of Isaac (Isaiah) and Elizabeth Ashenfelter. Born in Henry Co., Ohio. Auto 
plant worker, Flint, Mich. Also lived in and near Midland, Mich. Veteran World 
War I - U. S. Anr^. 

8. Marvin Charles (1921 - m. Ella Dee Hundley (1927 - 

Son of Moses and Ethel Michaels. Born in Chicago, 111. Salesman, Dolton, 111. 
Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Corp. No children. 

8. Marvin Glen (1938 - m. Sharon Ann Peek (19U2 - 

Son of George W. and Gladys Wyatt. Owns and operates a sheet-metal shop, Steph- 
enviUe, Tex. No children. 

6. Marvin Hayes (1875 - 1923) - m. Iva Belle Chapnan (1879 - 

Son of Moses and Margaret Ewers. Farmer in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. 
Children: Moses. 

9. Marvin J. (1925 - 1925). Son of Delbert E. and Cliva M. Wagoner, Toledo, Ohio, 
9. Mauri Lee (19U8 - . Son of Wilbur A. and Betty Eherenman, Plymouth, Ind. 

Maurice (also see Morris) 

8. Maurice (1921 - m. Loretta Brenneman (I92I4 - 

Son of Homer A. and Jessie Hilton. Born in Lewistown, 111. (Fulton Co.). General 
foreman, inspection - International Harvester plant. Canton, 111. Veteran World 
War II - U. S. Air Corps - Sgt. Children: Elizabeth Ann, Margaret Jean (Hagaman), 
John Edward, Roderick James, William Patrick, George Arthur, Emma Jo. 

8. Max Witsaman (1920 - ra. (l) Elizabeth Doyle (cl920 - ; (2) Callye Margaret 

Palermo (1931 - . Son of Frank C. and Elva Witsaman. Born in Randolph, Ohio. 
Salesman, Springfield, Mo. Veteran World War II - U. S. Arnry - Sgt. Children: 
Ryan Michale, Lisa Ann, Callye Ann (all adopted). 

9. Melvin Claude (1925 - m. (l) Viola R. Metz (cl928 - ; (2) Nancy Louise Sims 

(193U - . Son of Hoy E. and Pauline Wike. Steel-mill worker, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Children: (l) Melvin Claude Jr., Richard, Laurie; (2) Teriy Lee, Alice Jane, 
Donna Marie. 

10. Melvin Claude Jr. (cl950 - . Son of Melvin C. and Viola R. Metz, Harrisburg, Pa. 

7. Melvin J. (cl895 - m. Shepherd (cl895 - 

Son of (Isaiah) Ira and . Born in Clinton, 111, Now lives most of year 

in Tucson, Ariz. No children. 

171 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MAIES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Merle Hoss (1930 - m. (1) Bonnie Peck (cl930 - ; (2) Dolores Engles (cl930 - 
Son of Conde R. and Margery Trombley. Born in Battle Creek, Mich. Cabinetmaker, 
Roseville, Mich. (Detroit suburb) Veteran of Korean V/ar - U. S. Army - Corp. 
Children: (l) Terry Ross; (2) Robert Allen, Susan, Janet Lynn. 

8. Merlin D. (1921 - in. Bessie S. Baiunert (cl922 - 

Son of Herbert 0. and Lena L. Snyder. Farmer near Dornsife, Pa. (Northumberland 
Co.). No children. 

8. Merlin Dean (1932 - m. Joan Mae Soule (cl932 - 

Son of William E. and Pearl Fegley. Born near Herndon, Pa. (Northumberland Co.). 
Clerk, Air Force Base, Middletown, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Also in U. S. Arny previous- 
ly - Sgt. Children: Linda Sue, Patricia Ann, Merlin Dean, Jeffrey Alan. 

9. Merlin Dean Jr. (1959 - . Son of Merlin D. and Joan M, Soule, Middletown, Pa. 

7. Merrill Hazen (1912 - m. Hazel Isabel Lund (1912 - 

Son of Harvey N. and (Mary) Alice Hathaway. Born in South Whitley, Ind. 23 years 
in U. S. Marines and U. S. Navy, including World War II and Korean War - retired 
Warrant Officer. Now Forest Ranger, Imperial Beach, Calif. Children: Marilyn 
Joye (Wolfe). 

9. Mertice (cl933 - cl933). Son of Lloyd and Daisy E. Billman, Northumberland Co., Pa. i 

7. Mervin Dean (1903 - 1919). Son of Alpha T. and Flora Haefer, Seneca Co., Ohio. 

h. Michael (1799 - l87_) - m. Catharine Koppenheffer (l8lO - ? ) 

Son of William and Elizabeth Koppenheffer. Farmer in Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Coo, 
Pa. Children: Elizabeth (Schreffler), Daniel, Henry (Harry) C, David, Sarah, 
Catharine, Mary, Rebecca, Jacob C, Charles F. 

h. Michael (l8l2 - 1895) - m. (l) Leah Buchtel (l8l7 - 185U); (2) Polly Hollinger 
(Yoey) (cl8l5 - 1882). Son of Peter and Catharine Katterman. Born in Mifflin 
Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Onetime shoemaker. Farmer in Pike Twp,, Stark Co. and 
Montgomery Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. Children: (l) (William) Henry, Mary A. (Bowe), 
Lucy A. (Brooke), (John) Calvin, Rachael (Bowe), (Malinda) Ellen (Weller), 
Alfred Lemuel; (2) Sarah (Fairbanks). 

9. Michael (cl950 - . Son of Wilson E. and Connie Ward, Bend, Oregon. 

9. Michael (cl950 - . Son of Robert F. and , Alameda, Calif. 

9. Michael (1959 - . Son of (James) Luther E. and Marie I. Casey, Millersburg, Pa, 

9. Michael A. H. (I96l - . Son of Raymond B. and Bernice A. Mattern, Dornsife, Pa. 

8. Michael Alvin (1952 - . Son of George W. and Mary K, Eborg, Green Springs, Ohio. 

8. Michael Anthony (1956 - . Son of Roy 0. and Joyce A. Christensen, Los Angeles, Cal. 

9. Michael E. (19U5 - . Son of Dale E. and Betty L. Heisel, Columbus, Ohio. 

8. Michael Eric (19U6 - . Son of Earl B. and Amy E. Anderson, near Sturgis, Mich. 

172 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNBR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 
9. Michael Eugene (1957 - . Son of Carl V. and Mary L. Bannister, Galesburg, 111. 
9. Michael Lloyd (1957 - . Son of Ralph L. and Nancy Wielan, Shamokin Dam, Pa. 
9. Michael P. (i960 - . Son of James E. and Sue A. Buckley, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

9. Michael Ray (1959 - . Son of Jack E. and Martha Davis, Uniondale, Ind. 

8. Michael William (195U - . Son of Gus W. and Alma Barran, Denver, Colo. 

7. (Milton) Miles (I878 - 196U) - m. Dora A. Kline (I88O - 19Ul) 

Son of Adam H. and Valeria R. Schock. Farmer and rural mail-carrier, Bethel Twp., 
Berks Co., Pa. Children: Earl David, Blsie K. (Stamm), Adam Cyrus, Herbert C, 
George Harvey. 

5. Milo (A.?) (I8U2 - 1898) - m. Amelia (or Permelia) Thayer (l852 - ? ) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Kocher. Bom in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Laborer in Crawford and Henry Counties, Ohio and Ionia, Mich. Civil War veteran 
- Sgt. Co. E, 15th Mich. Inf. Children: Elsworth A. 

6. Milo Alvon (I87U - 1959) - m. (l) Catherine Lombardy (cl875 -?); (2) Theresa 

Jacklin (cl875 - ? )• Son of Samuel and Lej^nna Stout. Born in Crawford or Seneca 
Co., Ohio. Stationary steam engineer, Holgate, Ohio (Henry Co.). No children. 

6. Milo Sherman (I867 - 1932) - m. Clara May Jenkins (I876 - 

Son of Daniel and Elizabeth Wilson. Born in De Witt Twp., De Witt Co., 111. Car- 
penter (especially on railroad bridges), Clinton, 111. Also lived in Ohio and 
Iowa. Children: (Victor) Dewey, Harry Curtis, Arleigh Edward, Faye Edna, Elizabeth, 
Carrol Herbert, Nellie Elmida (Lewis). Widow lives near Rennselear, Ind. 

7. Milton J. (1876 - ? ) Died young. Son of Jacob and Rebecca Zeller, Bethel, Pa. 

7. Milton S. (1876 - ? ) - m. Sarah Elizabeth Weber (cl880 - ? ) 

Son of John and Diana Peiffer. Laborer, Sandhill, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). Children: 
Ethel May (Engle), Florence E. (Erby). 

8. Monte Joe (1953 - . Son of Earl B. and Any E. Anderson, near Sturgis, Mich. 

10. Monte Lynn (19U8 - . Son of John J. and Louetta E. Beard, Lemoyne, Pa. 

Morris (also see Maurice) 

6. Morris Calvin (I86I - 1952) - m. Isora I. Schlesman (I866 - 1933) 

Son of Jonathan and Catharine . Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. No children, 

5. Moses (1822 - 1905) - m. (l) Maria A. Bearce (I828) - 1866) (2) Margaret Ewers 
(l8Uh - 1920). Son of (George) Peter and Christiana Losh. Bom in Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Farmer in Hopewell Twp., Licking Co., Ohio and Lewistown Twp,, Fulton Co., 111. 
Children: (l) Lewis, Charles, Eliza, Newton, Ellen, Mary (Harrison), George, 
Temperance (Amett); (2) Madaline (Shields), Hubert, Louise (Willcoxen), Eliza- 
beth (Boyd), Charlotte (Qulgley), Mai^rin Hayes, (Henry) Shannon, Jennie (Gillam), 
Clifton, 

173 



PART B - REGISTER OF BQRDNKR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Moses (1897 - 1922) - m. Ethel Michaels (1900 - 1956) 

Son of Marvin H. and Iva B. Chapman. Born in Lewistown, 111. (Fulton Co.). Con- 
struction worker, Chicago, 111. Veteran World War I - U. S. Arny. Children: 
Marvin Charles, Robert Lewis. 

9. Myron Eugene (19U8 - . Son of Lester E. and Ethel Warfel, Lewisberry, Pa. 

7. McClellan Nelson (I89O - m. Helen Leora McComb (I889 - 

Son of Franklin (Frank) N. and Lulu H. Calvin. Born in Flatrock Township, Henry- 
Co., Ohio. Refrigeration engineer, near Metamora, Ohio (Fulton Co.). Also lived 
in Napoleon, Bowling Green, and Toledo, Ohio. Children: Evelyn Roberta (Pifer), 
Ruth Alice (Dence), Karl McClellan. 

7. Nathaniel Mark (I89I - m. Virginia M. Airey (1900 - 

Adopted son of Geary and Gertrude Wise. Coal analyst, Penn. Power & Light Co., 
Hazleton, Pa. (Luzerne Co.). Previously an accountant and store manager. Child- 
ren: Nathaniel Mark, Joan Patricia (Keuch). 

8. Nathaniel Mark Jr. (192U - m. Mildred Hugier (1919 - 

Son of Nathaniel M. and Virginia M. Airey. Born in Pleasantville, N. J. and 
raised in Hazletown, Pa. In U. S. Navy for 20 years, including World War II. 
Now Police Officer, Virginia Beach, Va. Children: Nathaniel Mark III. 

9. Nathaniel Mark III (1958 - . Son of Nathaniel M. and Mildred Hugier. 

8. Ned Robert (1938 - m. Marian Ruth Jeffries (I9hl - 

Son of Arnold B. and Coletta J. Curtzwiler. Machine operator, auto plant, Toledo, 
Ohio. Also in U. S. Air Force previously. Children: Kevin Robert. 

7. Nelson Edwin (1903 - m. Martha E. Stock (1909 - 

Son of Charles H. and Olive F. Schreffler. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northum- 
berland Coo, Pa. Carpenter, Millersburg, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). No children. 

6. Newton (cl85U - l85_) . Son of Moses and Maria A. Bearce, Fulton Co., 111. 

7. Niles Orris (I88U - I9U0) - m. Bessie Jolly (I88U - 19h5) 

Son of Franklin (Frank) J. and Emma Ream. Lumber- company foreman, near Canton, 
Ohio. Children: Russell Denver, Zelda (Whitacre). 

6. Noah Bartholomew (I868 - 195U) - m. (l) Catherine Herman (cl870 - cl895); (2) 

Dora Ellen King (l879 - . Son of Samuel and Leanna Stout. Born in Seneca Co., 
Ohio. Operated a threshing, sawmill, and lumber business in Holgate, Ohio 
(Henry Co.). Children: (1) Eliza; (2) Harry, Gerald, Charles Homer, George 
Washington. Vlidow lives in Holgate, Ohio. 

7. Norman Franklin (191U - m. Evelyn GraceKline (1917 - 

Son of Charles N. and Daisy M. Ziegler. Born in Mt. Pleasant Mills, Pa. (Snyder 
Co.). Grocer, Kreamer, Pa. (Snyder Co.). Children: Larry Dale, Joyce Ann (Nace). 

7. Norman J. (1900 - m. (l) Edna Cantrell (cl900 - ? ); (2) Louann Melbourn (cl907- 
Son of Edwin L. and Ida A. Snyder. Born in Wood Co., Ohio. Oil-driller, Wichita, 
Kans. Also lived in Okla. and Tex. Children: (l) Darryl W. ; (2) None. 

17U 



I 



PAR T B - R EGISTER OF BOHDNER MALE S AND TH EIR FAM ILIES 

8. Norman Levi (1920 - m. Arlene Jennie Erdman (1925 - 

Son of Harry A. and Grace J. Hoch. Born in Washington Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Shipping and receiving foreman, near Perkasie, Pa. (Bucks Co.). Veteran 
World War II - U. S. Arn^. Children: Grace E. (Bennett), June A. (Landis),, 
Vailiam H. 

5. (Lucius) Oliver (I863 - 1912) - in. Lucy D. Snyder (I86I - 1921) 

Son of George and Susanna Phillips. Born in Lower MahanoyTwp., Northumberland 
Co., Pa. Farmer in Ridgely, Hooper, and Hastings, Nebr. Children: Ida Susanna 
(Krueger), John George, Lottie Florence (Vermillion). 

6. Ora H. (1873 - 1962) - m. (1) Florence Allman (1372 - 1918); (2) Nellie Eisner 

(1887 - 1958). Born in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. Son of Daniel and 
Amanda Shade. Carpenter, Montpelier, Ohio; Orland, Ind.; Santa Fe, N. M. ; Bur- 
bank and North Hollywood, Calif. Children: (l) (James) Pierre; (2) Jack M. 
Nellie Eisner was previously married to Orval J. Bordner (q. v.); their child- 
ren: Arline Bernice (Denton), Orval Raymond. 

7. Ora Thomas (1906 - I908). Son of Samuel T. and Ida L. Eby, Plymouth, Ind. 

7. Ora Wayne (1913 - m. (l) Geraldine C. Snell (1915 - ; (2) Name unknown 
Son of Elza Elmer and Clara M. Ziegler. Factory worker, Ft. Wayne, Ind. and 
Holland, Mich. Children: (l) Earl Wayne, Lawrence Elmer; (2) Names unknown. 

7. Oren Earl (I89O - 19hh) - m. Olive E. Mosher (I889 - 1957) 

Son of Daniel W. and Susan Basht. Born in North Canton, Ohio. Machinist, Warren, 
Ohio. Children: George Donald, Edna June (Shrock). 

7. Orla Samuel (I889 - 1906). Son of Samuel T. and Ida L. Eby, Plymouth, Ind. 

7. Orlo Raymond (1912 - 192h) . Son of Alpha T. and Flora Haefer, Seneca Co., Ohio. 

6. Orval J. (1886 - 1913) - m. Nellie Eisner (I887 - 1958) 

Son of Aaron and Amanda Clark. Born near Tiffin, Ohio (Seneca Co.). Railroad 
conductor, Montpelier, Ohio and Ashley, Ind. Killed in railroad accident in 
Chicago, 111. Children: Arline Bernice (Denton), Orval Raymond. Widow married 
Ora H. Bordner (q. v.). 

7. Orval Raymond (1913 - m. Betty Jo Brown (1929 - 

Son of Orval J. and Nellie Eisner. Born in Montpelier, Ohio. Truck driver and 
mechanic, Santa Fe, N. M. Also lived in Detroit, Mich, and in Clayton and Hayden, 
N. M. Veteran World War II and Korean War - U. S. Array Eng. - Sgt. Children: 
Anne Jeanne, Patricia Louise. 

7. Orville E. (I908 - m. Laura I. Graves (1907 - 

Son of Elza E. and Clara P. May. Born in Warren, Ind. Factory storekeeper. Ft. 
Wayne, Ind. No children. 

6. Oscar (I87I - 1958) - m. Clara Peck (l877 - 

Son of Daniel and Amanda Shade. Bom in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Thrasher and carpenter, Montpelier, Ohio. No children. Widow lives in Montpelier. 

175 



PAR T B - REGISTER OF BORDNER i^ALES AND THBIR F AMILIES 

8. Oscar (1905 - m. Myrtle Alice Turner (Browman) (190U - 

Son of Thomas E. and Mary E. Stoneroad. Born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Laborer in Millersburg, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Children: Betty Mae (Shomper), Emma 
Jane (Bodman - Grim), Donald Cleveland. 

8. Oscar Elias (1892 - 1957) - m. Hilda S. Ettele (1395 - 

Son of Jonathan P. and Emma Merkey. Born in Lebanon, Pa. Comptroller, Hershey 
Chocolate Corp., Hershey, Pa. Children: Sarah (Tapman), Joan (Wanfried). V/idow 
lives in Hershey, Pa. 

6. Oscar Elmer (1369 - 1959) - m. Ada L. Cooper (clSyO - 19U5) 

Son of Alfred and Jane Hasson. Bom in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Steam 
engineer in logging camps in the State of Wash. Lived last years in Burlington, 
Wash. Children: Otha, Marie, Fae, Glen, Donald William. 

6. Oscar Foster (1379 - 1953) - m. Sylvia Amelia Dugan (I879 - 196U) 

Son of Henry (Harry) C. and Emma (Woods). Born in Lewistown, Pa. (Mifflin 

Co.). Railroad clerk, Chicago, 111.; Daugherty, Iowa; Hugo, Okla.; and Los Ange- 
les, Calif. Children: Harry, Chrystal Margaret (Davis), Lyle James, Cyril Francis, 
Earl Charles, Wilbur Joseph, Roy Oscar, Adrian Jay, Harold Keith, Sylvia Marie. 

6. Osmar L. (I898 - m. Edna Eugenia Colvin (1898 - 

Son of Levi and Mary J. Waller. Born in Crawford Co., Ohio. Railroad conductor, 
Willard, Ohio (Huron Co.). No children. 

8. Oswald Daniel (1917 - m. Bettie I. Mark (cl923 - 

Son of Harvey F. and Sarah J. Behrens . Born in Hummelstown, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 
In U. S. Air Force 22 years, including World War II. Now lives near Halifax, Pa. 
(Dauphin Co.). Children: Richard Erick, Carol Ann, Jeannette. 

6. Otis E. (1871 - 1950) - m. Margaret Belle Van Coyte (1370 - 19 36) 

Son of John Washington and Sarah E. Stigner. Born near Ligonier, Noble Co., Ind. 
Factory worker, Mishawaka, Ind. Children: Glen, Guy, Bernice Elaine (Rybecki), 
Howard Solomon. 

7. Otis Milton (l885 - 1965) - m. Levetah Lee Shaw (I888 - 1950) 

Son of George I. and Elnma L. Johnson. Born in Council Grove, Kans. Printer, in 
Norton, Baldwin, and Kansas City, Kans.; Kidder, Cameron, and Hamilton, Mo.; 
Sterling, Nebr.; Pawhuska, Okla.; Sweeny, Tex. Children: Harold Clayton, Roy 
Oliver, James Otis, Ona Marie. 

7. Otto E. (1896 - 1957) - m. Etta R. Butterfield (I896 - 

Son of James E. and Leoria S. McLouth. Stock-buyer, Lewistown, 111. (Fulton Co.). 
Veteran World War I - U. S. Arnry. No children. 

9. Owen Steve (19U5 - . Son of Roy 0. and Mary E. Seeley, Seattle, Wash. 

9. Patrick Thomas (I963 - . Son of Thomas A. and Mary J. Giambruno, Tiffin, Ohio. 

7. (Clarence) Paul (1893 - m. (l) Anna Potter (190U - I96U); (2) Denie Monical 
(Halsey)(cl900 - . Son of (Francis) Marion and Martha Levingston. Carpenter, 
Bennett, Colo, and Tampa, Fla. Children: (l) Robert Paul, William Potter, 
Barbara (Smith), James Richardj (2) None. 

176 



PART B - REG ISTER OF BOR DNER MALES AND TH EIR FAM ILIES 

9. Paul (1957 - . Son of John R. and Louise Rex, Philadelphia, Pa. 

7. Paul Arthur (1909 - Unmarried. 

Son of (Oliver) Perry and Sarah Brown. Bom in Lewistovm Twp., Fulton Co., Ill, 
Lives in Chicago, 111. 

7. Paul Berger (I898 - 1963) - m. Nancy Owens Fisher (1902 - 

Son of George C. and Mary M. Berger. Born in Bernville, Pa. and raised in Kutz- 
town. Pa. (Berks Co.). Mathematician, Philadelphia, Pa. Lived in Newtown Square, 
Pa. Veteran World War I - U. S. krmy. Children: Nancy Ann (Whitaker), Carolyn 
Jane (Quinn). 

7. Paul C. (1896 - m. Minerva (Minnie) Mengel (l899 - 

Son of William J. and Emma L. Dundore. Born in Bethel, Pa. (Berks Co.). Auto- 
service manager. Temple, Pa. (Berks Co.). Children: Harold E., Arthur J, 

7. Paul Daniel (1927 - m. Mary G. R. Herb (1926 - 

Son of Dorsey A. and Maude A. Lubold. Laborer, near Hemdon, Fa. (Northumberland 
Co.). Children: Harold E., Marlene F., Kenneth C, Virginia M., Kathy R. , Shirley 
J., Cindy L., Jerry A., Steven R. , Roger J., John W. , Ruby M. , Eric. 

9. Paul Edward (1963 - . Son of Francis E, and Rachel A. Fairman, North Chicago, 111. 

7. Paul Elmer (1921 - m. (l) Edith Myers (cl921 - ; (2) Sylvia Blevins (cl925 - 

Son of Elmer and Ida Hendel. Born near Attica, Ohio (Seneca Co.). Gypsum-plant 
worker. Port Clinton, Ohio. Children: (l) Paul Elmer, Ronald Allen; (2) None. 

8. Paul Elmer Jr. (19U5 - • Son of Paul Elmer and Edith Myers, Attica, Ohio. 

7. Paul Franklin (I9l8 - m. Walteretta C. Hoke (cl9l8 - 

Son of John F. and Sula C. Bickhart. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland 
Co., Pa. Lives in New Cumberland, Pa. Children: Paulette (Keister). 

8. Paul Gerald (19U0 - m. Shirley Ann Schumacher (l9hl - 

Son of Elmer F. and Esther Harvey. Draftsman, Columbus, Ohio. Children: Keith 
Allen . 

8. Paul Harrison (1925 - 

Son of Arnold B. and Coletta J. Curtzwiler, Toledo, Ohio. No information. 

7. Paul John (1911 - m. (l) Eva Mae Ritter (cl911 - ; (2) Josephine (cl9l5-; 

(3) Lillian (cl9l5 - ; (U) Florence Sonn (cl9l5 - 

Son of Johnson Per Lee and Jane 0. Stokes. Born in or near Canton, Ohio. Sales- 
man and Security-guard, Canton, Ohio and Miami, Fla. Veteran World War II - U.S. 
Arn^r. Children: (l) Wayne Richard; (2) (3) (U) None. 

8. Paul John (l9Ul - . Unmarried. 

Son of Glen and La Moile Scheiber. Auto-factory worker. South Bend, Ind. 

9. Paul Leland (1928 - ra. Jane Isabel Paul (1928 - 

Son of Chester R. and Cora L. Keister. Born in Rockford, 111. Corporate control- 
ler, Janesville, Wise. Veteran World War II - U. S. AniQr. Children: Scott Paul, 

Gary Ray, Gregg Stuart. 

177 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDN ER MALES AND THEI R FAMILIES 

8. Paul P. (1900 - . Son of Jacob H. and Ida Weaver. Born in Swatara Twp., Lebanon 
Co., Pa. No additional information. 

6. Paul Roland (1906 - I96O) - m. Rose K. Woods (1909 - 

Son of (Charles) Franklin (Frank) and Mary Heckert. Born in Geneva, Nebr. Con- 
struction worker, Houston, Tex. Children: Roland Lee. Widow lives in Houston. 

8. Paul William (1903 - ra. Mildred Almira Hoffman (cl910 - 

Son of William H. and Ada L. Paul. Public-school teacher, Akron, Ohio. Children: 
Rebecca Susanna, Johanna Paul. 

7. Paul Wilson (1902 - 19Ul) - m. Marie A. Spiegelhalter (cl905 - 

Son of Charles W. and Ella M. Buhr. Born in White Deer Twp., Northumberland Coo, 
Pa. Laborer in Altoona and Philadelphia, Pa. Children: John Rhodes. Widow lives 
in Philadelphia. 

8. Pedro Carpio (1905 - m. Victorina Dacara (1920 - 

Son of John H. and Luiza E. Carpio. Owns and operates a rice mill, truck fleet, 
and general store, Zamboanga, Philippine Islands. Children: William, Edna (Fer- 
nandez), Aida, Henry, Josephine, Elizabeth, Elsie. 

5. Percival (l829 - 1902) - m. Lovina Miller (1832 - 1910) 

Son of Daniel and Catharine Viehman. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa, 
Laborer in Bethel Twp., Berks Co, and Myerstown, Pa. (Lebanon Co.), Children: 
Jacob Miller, Catharine (Frantz), Percival, Theodore, Daniel Glancy, Henry, 
Charles, Joha M. 

6. Percival Jr. (Percy) (18^9 - cl9l5) - m. Alice (cl860 - ? ) 

Son of Percival and Lovina Miller. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Coachman 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. No children. 

6. (Oliver) Perry (I878 - m. Sarah Brown (I88O - 

Son of Alfred and Jane Hasson. Farmer in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. 
Children: Lena, Thomas Lyle, Leona (Farris), Dorothy (Draher), Mildred, Paul 
Arthur, Lillian Bemice, Wilma (Benac). Wife lives in Canton, 111. 

7. Perry Jacob (I888 - 19^0) - m. Floretta Bantz (I888 - 1957) 

Son of Finley B. and Clara J. Krisher. Head of P. J. Bordner & Co., Inc. (food 
stores), Massillon, Ohio (founded by his father). Children: Delmar John Benton, 
Ruth (Anthony), Edward Robert. 

3. Peter (I763 - I8I6) - m. Catharine Katterman (1771 - 1853) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Bait. Bom in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Farmer in Bethel 
Twp. and in Upper Paxton Twp. (part now in Mifflin Twp.), Dauphin Co., Pa. Child- 
ren: (George) Peter, Anna Maria (Koppenheffer), Philip, Catharine (Shreffler), 
John (p.), Jacob, (Maria) Marbara (Hufnagle), Daniel, Michael, Sarah (Bahney). 

li. Peter (I787 - I867) - m. (1) Margaret Nuvinger (I787 - l8h8); (2) Elizabeth 



(1797 - 186_). Son of John and Susanna . Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co,, 

Pa. Farmer in Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: (1) Jonathan, Mary, 
Salome (Sarah - Roop), John, Margaret, Veronica (Franey - Koppenheffer), 
Susanna (Weiser), Hannah (Snyder), Catharine, Benjamin. 

178 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

U. (George) Peter (1792 - I88I) - m. Christiana (Christina) Losh (cl792 - 1895) 
Son of Peter and Catharine Katterman. Bom in l^per Paxton Twp. (part now in 
Mifflin Twp.), Dauphin Co., Pa. Farmer in Mifflin Twp. and in Lower Mahanoy Twp., 
Northumberland Co., Pa.; Hopewell Twp., Licking Co., Ohio; and Lewistown Twp., 
Fulton Co., 111. Children: Jonathan, Catharine (Shaw), Angelina (Shaw - Brown), 
Moses, Lavina (Baker), George Washington, Margaret (Ewers), Peter, Sarah, 
Frances (McCracken), Temperance (Bass), Alfred, Christiana (Christina - Putnam). 

h. Peter (I8II - I88U) - m. Anna Maria (Polly) Hepner (I813 - I876) 

Son of Balthaser and Magdalena Eraerich. Blacksmith, Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northum- 
berland Co., Pa. Children: Sarah Anna (Kimble), Margaret, Rebecca (Bubb or Bobb), 
Anna Maria (Polly - Brann), Catharine (Hoffman), Isaac, Henry, Benjamin, Samurl, 
Elizabeth, Mary Ann (Reichenbach), (Emma) Jane (Engle), Frederick Milton; another 
son, name unknown, died young. 

5. Peter (I828 - 1905) - ra. Nancy J. Shortnes (1837 - I870) 

Son of (George) Peter and Christiana Losh. Born in Hopewell Twp., Licking Co., 
Ohio. Farmer in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Children; John Wesley, 
(Nancy) Ellen (Windsor), Charles Washington, Alice Sarata (Windsor), (Emma) Nora 
(Brown), Albert Lee. 

6. Peter (i860 - 7 ) - m. Moyer (cl860 - ? ) 

Son of David and Dina Schneider. Born in Bethel Twp,, Berks Co., Pa. Farmer in 
Washington Co., Kans. and in Lebanon Co., Pa. Children; Minerva M. (Urich). 

9. Peter Jude (1953 - . Son of Carl and Josephine Rossi, Batavia, N. Y. 

6. Peter R. (l85l - 1852). Son of Benjamin and Mary Ann Enterline, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

h. Philip (1796 - 1851) - m. Readle (or Rodel) (cl796 - cl839) 

Son of Peter and Catharine Katterman. Born in l^per Paxton Twp. (part now in 
Mifflin Twp.), Dauphin Co., Pa. Farmer in Mifflin Twp., Dauphin Co. and in 
Bethlehem Twp., Stark Co., Ohio; Baughman Twp. and Chippewa Twp., Wayne Co., 
Ohio; and in De Kalb Co., Ind. (probably Stafford Twp.). Children; Mary(Kemery), 
Catharine (Richards), Margaret (Cannon), Frances (Fanny - Shafer), Jonathan, 
Hannah (Maugler), Daniel, Sarah (Bowers), David F., Solomon; two other sons, 
names unknown, died young. 

h. (John) Philip (1797 - 1895) - m. Mary Ann Guest (l802 - I88O) 

Son of Henry and Susanna Alburt. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Fanner in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio and in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., 
Ohio. Children: Jesse, Anna (Slight-Shild-Schaefer), Benjamin Franklin, Philip, 
Isaac Andrew, Pitney, Catharine (Shaffer), Henry, Caroline (Cummins), Matilda, 
Elijah, Harriet (Crobaugh). 

U. Philip (1810 - 1871) - Unmarried. 

Son of Balthaser and Magdalena Emerich. Farmer in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northum- 
berland Co., Pa. 

5. Philip (1830 - 1913) - m. Catharine Weaver (1835 - 1918) 

Son of (John) Philip and Mary Ann Guest. Born in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio and 
raised in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. Farmer in Pleasant Twp., Florida 
Twp., and Flatrock Twp., Henry Co., Ohio. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. B, 100th 
Ohio Inf. Children; Elizabeth, Margaret Jane (Smith), Nancy Viola (Trietch). 

179 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOHDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Philip (1857 - 1908) Unmarried. 

Son of William and Susanna Runk. Lived in Jefferson Tvip., Dauphin Co., Pa. 

9. Philip Charles (1929 - m. Doris Jean Bloompott (1931 - 

Son of Lawrence M. Sr. and Phyllis J. Freidag. Born in St. Louis, Mo. and lived 
in Freeport, 111. Salesman, Hurst, Tex. In U. S. Navy for 10 years - Lt. Child- 
ren: Rebecca Milree, Robert Russell II, Barry Alan. 

7. Pierce (I886 - ? ) Died young. Son of Jacob and Rebecca Zeller, Bethel, Pa. 

7. (James) Pierre (1905 - m. (l) May Pearl Batson (1906 - ; (2) Amy Davis (1907- ; 
(3) Marion Elizabeth Rowe (1920 - . Son of Ora H. and Florence Allman. Born in 
Or land, Indi Mechanical engineer, Sepulveda, Calif. Children: (1) Betty Lou 
(Lommell), Bobbie Jo (Fridrick); (2) (3) None. 



f 



5. Pitney (I836 - 1928) - m. Mary Ann Burton (I8I16 - 1928) 

Son of (John) Philip and Mary Ann Guest. Bom in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., 
Ohio. Farmer in Flatrock and Pleasant Twps., Henry Co., Ohio. Civil War veteran 

- Priv. Co. B, 100th Ohio Inf. Children: Pamela Jane (Kemmer), Ida Ellen (Mollett),! 
Anna Bell (Huber). Also had an adopted son, Archie B. 

8. Ralph (I90U - 1905). Son of Harvey E. and Delia M. Wilson, Henry Co., Ohio. 

8. Ralph Alkire (1912 - 193U). Son of Ira J. and Kathryn Aikire, Brookston, Ind. 

8. Ralph Briggs (1909 - m. Dorothy Marian Himelwright (1911 - 

Son of Albert L. and Mary A. Briggs. Bom in Vymore, Nebr. Store manager, Nampa, 
Idaho and Ontario, Oregon. Veteran World War II - U. S. Marines. Children; 
Susan Kay. 

7. Ralph Burton (1921 - m. Fay Kloise Mohler (1926 - 

Son of George C. and Mary M. Berger. Born in Kutztovn, Pa. (Berks Co.). Mechani- 
cal engineer, Western Electric Co., Topton, Pa. (Berks Co.). Veteran World War II 

- U. S. krmy Art. - Lt. Col. Children: Gretchen Rene, David Alan (both adopted). 

7. Ralph C. (1887 - 1962) - m. Alice Elizabeth Meyers (cl890 - 

Son of Jacob and Rebecca Zeller. Iron worker, Lebanon, Pa. Children: Berle 
(Moyer), Mary E, (Wagner), Harry R. , Robert Walter, Helen (VJeaver). Widow lives 
in Lebanon, Pa. 

8. Ralph E. (1903 - 1951) - m. Coletta H. Richards (1908 - 

Son of Homer E. and Catherine E. Yutzey. Farmer near Louisville, Ohio (Stark 
Co.). Chi]dren: Karen Elaine (Van Nichols). Widow lives in Canton, Ohio. 

8. Ralph Edward (1918 - m. Flora Nell Reves (192U - 

Foster son of John C. and Any Dietz. Born in Beloit, Wise. Sup't. of Robin 
School, East Peoria, 111. Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Force - Lt. Col. 
Children; Lillian, Jo Ann, Ralph Edward. 

9. Ralph Edward Jr. {l9Sh - . Son of Ralph E. and Flora N. Reves, East Peoria, 111, 

180 I 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MAIES AN D THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Ralph Eugene (1936- m. Judith Estherly (cl936 - 

Son of Roy E. and Virginia Lentz. Equipment operator, Penn. Highway Dep't., High- 
spire, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Children: Ralph Eugene, Vicki, Jeffrey. 

10. Ralph Eugene Jr. (19^9 - . Son of Ralph E. and Judith Estherly, Highspire, Pa. 

7. Ralph Grover (1906 - m. Nary Evelyn Hall (1909 - 

Son of Franklin (Frank) W. and Marzella Arner. Born near Bolivar, Ohio. Restau- 
rant operator. Canton, Ohio. No children. 

7. Ralph Leroy (1886 - m. Fern Hake (l889 - 

Son of John E. and Catharine E. Friend. Farmer in Florence Twp., Williams Co., 
Ohio. Children: Lester Dale, Leeta L. (Canpbell), Recil J., Veda Mae (Kaiser). 

8. Ralph Lloyd (1923 - m. (l) Martha Wiegand (1915 - ; (2) Nancy Whelan (cl925 - 

Son of Lloyd E. and Jennie C. Reigle. Laborer, Hummels Wharf, Pa. (Snyder Co.). 
Children: (l) Sharon Louise; (2) Randy William, Sandra Lavail, Michael Lloyd, 
Katiiy Ann. 

6. Ralph Lloyd (I87O - 1959) - m. Viola Jane Evertt (I877 - 196?) 

Son of Benjamin F. and Mary Dunlap. Farmer and local government official, Fawi 
River Twp., St. Joseph Co., Mich. Children: Clare Eugene, Zaida M., Irene, Earl 
Benjamin. 

8. Ralph Lowell (1936 - 1936). Son of Clare E. and Vlillie Mary Shearman, St. Joseph 
Co., Mich. 

8. Ralph Monroe (cl9l5 - m. (l) Margaret M. Cox (1918 - ; (2) Burdella Marie 
Tipton (cl920 - . Son of Roy L. and Catherine Stockert. Owns and operates a 
nursery, Ida, Mich. Also lived in Canton and Toledo, Ohio. Children: (l) Ralph 
William, Mary Patricia (Zeitz); (2) None. 

7. Ralph Oliver (I9II - 1963) - ra. Mayme K. Bartlett (1905 - 

Son of Vernon E. and jCleo M. Collins. Born in Kansas Station, Ohio (Seneca Co.). 
City employee. Tiffin, Ohio. Also lived in Toledo, Clyde, and Bellevue, Ohio. 
Children: Victor Le Roy, Ralph Oliver, Margaret (S^ith), Lester, Phy^lliss J. 
(Schaade), Edith Darlene (Romig), Thomas Franklin, Leonard Charles, James Pat- 
rick, Robert Larry. Widow lives in Tiffin, Ohio. 

8. Ralph Oliver Jr. (1935 - . Sonof Ralph 0. and Mayme K. Bartlett, Tiffin, Ohio. 

8. Ralph Sylvester (1906 - m. Mary Alice Conrad (1910 - 

Son of Emanuel S. and Eliza A. Kistner. Born in Northumberland, Pa. Truck driv- 
er for power company, Sunburj", Pa. (Northumberland Co.). Children: Daniel Ralph, 
Marion K. (Shultz). 

7. Ralph Waldo Dubs (I887 - 1953) - m. Marie Victoria Engstrom (I888 - I963) 

Son of Daniel K. and Sarah M. Geyer. Born in Glebe, Va. (Albemarle Co.). Owned 
and operated a gas station, East Moline, 111. Also lived in Dakota Twp., Steph- 
enson Co., 111. Children: Ralph Waldo, Duane KlJne, June Marilyn. 

8. Ralph Waldo (1929 - ra. Carol Irene Feuser (1933 - 

Son of Ralph W. D. and Mary A. Conrad. Owns and operates a gas station. East 
Moline, 111. Children: Gary Alan, Holly Jo. 

181 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Ralph William (1926 - m. Miriam Ruth Schamber (cl92li - 

Son of William F. and Bertha M. Schaeffer. Shoe-factory worker, near Jonestown, 
Pa. (Lebanon Co.)- No children. 

9. Ralph Vlilliam (1936 - m. Jacqueline M. Henry (1936 - 

Son of Ralph M. and Margaret M. Cox. Office -equipment salesman, North Canton, 
Ohio. Also lived in Prairie Village, Kans. Children: Theresa S., Shirley M., 
Jeffrey W. 

9. Randall Allen (1959 - . Son of Donald C. and Viola Brunner, New Washington, Ohio. 

7. Randall M. (195U - . Son of Boyd F. and Lorraine A. Deppen, Dauphin, Pa. 

9. Randolph E. (1952 - . Son of Ernest A. and Alice J. Bordner, Harrisburg, Pa. 

9. Randy Dale (1938 - . Son of George W. and Lucille Vernier, Louisville, Ohio. 

9. Randy Hurrel (19^1 - • Son of Robert H. and Bonnie Lee Johnson, Raytown, Mo. 

9. Randy William (195? - . Son of Ralph L. and Nancy Whelan, Shamokin Dam, Pa. 

Ray (also see Raymond, Roy) 

7. Ray (1906 - m. Dorothy Keeney (l9l6 - 

Son of Henry and Mary E. Siders. Born in Shamokin, Pa. (Northumberland Co.). 
Fireman, Quaker Hill, Conn. Also lived in Scotland, Pa. and Poquonock Bridge, 
Conn. Children: Raymond Kenney, Thomas Noel, Bruce Smith. 

8. (Henry) Ray (1923 - m. Doris Hymbaugh (1925 - 

Son of Ross A. and Minnie Ray. Farmer and factory worker, near I^wistown, 111. 
(Fulton Co.). Veteran World War II - U. S. Arnry - Sgt. No children. 

9. Ray (195U - . Son of Carl S. and Jean Neuschwander, Dakota, 111. 

7. Ray Benjamin (1899 - m. Edith Susan Dietz (1903 - 

Son of Charles R. and Olive F. Schreffler. Bom in Washington Twp., Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. Railroad-track laborer and machinist, Millersburg, Pa. (Dauphin 
Co.). Children: Margaret Eva (Snyder), John Charles, Jean Esther (Border). 

8. Raymond Bruce (1930 - m. Bernice A. Mattern (1931 - 

Son of Harry A. and Grace J. Hoch. Factory worker, near Dornsife, Pa. (Northum- 
berland Co.). Children: Steven R. , Thomas G., Michael A. H. 

8. Raymond Charles (1919 - m. Helen E. Schaeffer (cl920 - 

Son of William T. and Verda E. Fisher. Foreman in Air Force maintenance shops, 
Middletown, Pa. Lives in Myerstown, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). Children: Sally Nan 
(Eisenhauer), Susan Rae. 

8. Raymond D. (1901 - m. Edna Shubert (1903 - 

Son of Harry (Henry H.) and Caroline Parfait. Born in Mahanoy City, Pa. (Schuyl- 
kill Co.). Clock and watch factory employee, Bristol, Conn. Also lived in Water- 
bury, Conn. Children: Joan (Warren). 

182 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MIES AND THEIR FAMILIES 
9. Raymond Douglas (1965 - . Son of Richard L. and Shirley Yates, Orlando, Fla. 

7. Raymond Earl (1888 - 193U) - m. Ina Strayer (188? - 

Son of James and Louisa Rummel. Farmer in Dakota Twp. , Stephenson Co., 111. Child- 
ren: Earl Raymond, Pauline Ellen (Schubert), Carl Strayer, Harold Clyde. 

8. Raymond Edgar (1919 - m. Maunda (cl9?5 - 

Son of Charles E. and Sarah Usher. Born in Delmont, S. D. Worker on oil-drilling 
rig in Louisiana. Last known residence, Harney, La. Veteran World War II - U. S. 
Navy (submarines). Children: Charles Vaughn, Wayne. 

9. Raymond Edgar (l9iil - m. Esther Irene Raker (19U5 - 

Son of Boy E. and Virginia Lentz. Laborer, near Elizabethville, Pa. (Dauphin Co.) 
No children. 

9. Raymond Ellis (19^6 - Unmarried. 

Son of Lyle M. and Helen E. Green, Pinellas Park, Fla. In U. S. Marine Corps. 

8. Raymond Eugene (I9I48 - 1952). Son of Darl E. and Edith M. Langlois, Seneca Co., 0. 

9.. Raymond Gordon (1929 - m. Nancy Lee Immegart (1932 - 

Son of Wilson and Aria I. Nehrboss. Accountant - Internal Revenue Agent, Crit- 
tenden, N. Y. Children: Gary Raymond, Karen Lee, Gregory Wilson. 

7. Raymond Harold (I92li - m. Kathryn Marie Hensinger (1925 - 

Son of Lester and Jennie Meyer. Rubber-plant worker, near Attica, Ohio. Child- 
ren: David Raymond, Susan Marie. 

8. Raymond Keeney (19U0 - . Son of Ray and Dorottiy Keeney, Quaker Hill, Conn. 

7. Raymond Paul (1921 - m. Loretta Sophia Rothenbuhler (1920 - 

Son of Vernon E. and Cleo M. Collins. Born in Kansas, Ohio (Sandusky Co.). 
General contractor, Monclova, Ohio. Veteran VJorld War II - U. S. Navy. Children: 
Juanita Annette (Dayringer). 

8. Recil J. (1910 - m. Donna V. Lesnet (1912 - 

Son of Ralph L. and Catherine E. Friend. Born in Florence Twp., Williams Co., 
Ohio. Manufacturer of magical apparatus. Colon, Mich. (St. Joseph Co.). Child- 
ren: Martin Alan, Greg W. 

9. Reuben (I9I1? - . Son of Juan C. and Regina Limen, Zamboanga, Philllpine Islands. 

8. Richard (1936 - Unmarried 

Son of Henry M. and Frances H. Buffington. Steel-mill worker, Steelton, Pa. 

7. (Charles) Richard (1936 - m. Barbara A. Mader (1937 - 

Son of William M. and Sylvia M. Long. Born in Riverside, Pa. (Northumberland 
Co.). Highway-equipment operator, Danville, Pa. (Montour Co.). Children: 
Richard Michael, Linda Kay, Deborah Ann. 

10. Richard (cl950 - . Son of Melvin C. and Viola R. Metz, Harrisburg, Pa. 

10. Richard Alan (1955 - . Son of William H. and Joan L. Wimer, Rouzerville, Pa. 

183 



PART B - REGISTER OF BOBDNER MALBS AND THEIR FAMILIES 
8. Richard Alan (I960 - . Son of Marlin W. and Carol A. Straw, near Dillsburg, Pa. 

8. Richard Bazzoni (1939 - Unmarried. 

Son of Charles A. and Edith L. Bazzoni. Born in New York City. Draftsman, 
Tonawanda, N. Y. 

9. Richard C. (1933 - m. Eleanor Uhler (cl935 - 

Son of Calvin P. and Mollie P. Balthaser. Born in Strausstown, Pa. (Berks Co.). 
Insurance agent, Jonestown, Pa. (Lebanon Co.) Children: Robert C, James Michael. 

9. Richard E. (1935 - 19UU). Son of Roy E. and Virginia Lentz, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

9. Richard Earl (1931 - m. Evelyn Pearl Berry (1933 - 

Son of Earl C. and Alice M. Merrimen. Field engineer for a steel company, Hassi- 
lon, Ohio. Children; Pamela Jo, David Richard, Brenda Lee, Thomas Robert. 

10. Richard Earl (19U2 - m. Dona Jean Leighton (19U2 - 

Son of Richard McK. and Virginia E. Coldren. In U. S. Navy - Petty Officer. 
Home in Harrisburg, Pa. No children. 

9. Richard Erick (19U5 - . Son of Oswald D. and Bettie I. Mark, near Halifax, Pa. 

9. Richard Eugene (1928 - m. Betty J. David (cl930 - 

Son of Ezra Rinehart and ffyrtle Bordner (Rinehart). Took mother's maiden name 
when she divorced. Truck driver, Wichita, Kans. Also lived in or near Lebanon, 
Pa. Children; Richard Eugene, Kay Lorraine, Cynthia, Daniel, Audrey. 

10. Richard Eugene Jr. (cl950 - . Son of Richard E. and Betty J. David, Lebanon, Pa. 

9. Richard Eugene il9$h - . Son of Leonard A. and Mary J. Shaffer, Selinsgrove, Pa. 

8. Richard Evans (1928 - m. Wanda Stepick (1926 - 

Son of (Isaac) Martin and Gwendolene Evans. Bom in Riverside, Calif. Indust- 
rial-service representative. Walnut Creek, Calif. Also lived in Santa Barbara, 
Santa Monica, Monterey, and elsewhere in Calif. In U. S. Navy U years, includ- 
ing part of World War II. Children; Richard Martin, Nanette Alyce. 

8. Richard Glen (1931 - m. (l) Mary Lou Kiger (cl931 - 5 (2) Mary Susanne Culp 

(cl931 - • Son of William L. and Alice Newman. Bom in Shreve,Ohio (Holmes Co.),. 
In U. S. Army - Staff Sgt., following h years in U. S. Navy. Presently in Wash- 
ington, D. C. Children; (l) William Michael; (2) William Itoy, Harry L. 

8. Richard Jerome (1927 - m. Mary Ellen Long (1928 - 

Son of Robert Simon and Jeanette von Mengeringhausen. Born in Lancaster, Pa. 
Supervisor of industrial relations, Martin -I4arietta Corporation, Orlando, Fla. 
Children; Beth Allison, Linda Kristine, Susan Long. 

10. Richard Jon (l96l - . Son of Thomas E. and Lenita Johnson, near Freeport, 111. 

8. Richard Lee (19U1 - m. Shirley Yates (19U2 - 

Son of Conde H. and Marjorie Trombley. Born in Battle Creek, Mich. Computer 
technician, Orlando, Fla. Children; Raymond Douglas. 

I8h 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MIES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Richard Lee (1950 - . Son of Virgil H. and Pl:yllis Buck, Mishawaka, Ind. 

9. Richard Leroy (19U3 - . Son of Titus L. and Edith J. Lenig. Name changed upon 
adoption by others, unknown. 

7. Richard Lewis (cl872 - 1951) - m. (l) Belle Taylor (cl875 - ? ); (2) Iva Kraft 

(cl880 - ? ). Son of Henry and Caroline Boyer. Attorney at lavi, Jesup, Iowa and 
South Omaha, Nebr. No children. 

8. Richard Lewis (1927 - m. Margaretta E. Brosius (1929 - 

Son of Irvin A. and Josephine E. Hilbush. Auto salesman, Herndon, Pa. Children: 
Christine Adele, Kim Robin. 

9. Richard Martin (1953 - • Son of Richard E. and Vianda Stepick, Walnut Creek, Calif. 

8. Richard Michael (l96l - . Son of (Charles) Richard and Barbara A. Mader, Danville, 

Pa. 

9. Richard McKay (1918 - m. Virginia Esther Coldren (1917 - 

Son of William G. and Bertha V. Rhoads. Railroad freight conductor, Harrisburg, 
Pa. Veteran World War II - U. S. Arny. Children: Richard Earl, Patricia Ann. 

6. Richard R. (l869 - 1937) - m. (l) Lillde L. Burd (cl872 - 1899); (2) Hannah A. 

Stell (Deibler) (cl872 - 1938). Son of Isaac and Harriet Reichenbach, Born in 
Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northuiriberland Co., Pa. Laborer and railroad man, Northum- 
berland, Pa. Children: (l) John, George Robert, Catharine G. (Bowers - Fenton)} 
(2) Minnie V. (Kulp), Anna Matilda (Frehafer). 

7. Richard Thomas (1909 - m. Marian E. Hoats (cl910 - 

Son of George C. and Mary Mo Berger. Bom in Kutztown, Pa. (Berks Co.). Mathe- 
matics teacher, high schools, Audobon, N. J. Also lived in Collingwood and else- 
where in N. J. Children: Kenneth R. 

8. Robert (l888 - 1959) - m. (l) Ida Smith (cl890 - ? ); (2) Margaret Callahan (cl890 

- ? ). Son of Jonathan P. and Emma Merkey. Born in Lebanon, Pa. Railway mail 
clerk, Hummelstown, Pa. and near Philadelphia, Pa. (in Delaware Co.). No children, 

8. Robert (1899 - m. Eunice Merton (I89I4 - 

Son of William H. and Ada L. Paul. Born in Akron, Ohio. Writer, journalist, and 
historian. Peninsula, Ohio. Onetime feature writer for Cleveland News. Veteran 
World War I - U. S. Army. No children. 

7. Robert (I90I4 - 1959) Unmarried. 

Son of John H. and Emma M. Deck. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa, Linotype 
operator, Jersey City, N. J. 

8. Robert Allan (1952 - . Son of Adrian J. and Dorothy M. Nelson, Burbank, Calif. 

9. Robert Allen (1956 - . Son of Merle R. and Dolores Engle, Roseville, Mich. 

9. Robert Bruce (1918 - I96I) - m. Dorotlny 

Son of Elmer A. and Nora B. Dulaney. Born in Independence, Iowa. Died in Atlanta, 
Ga. No other information. 

185 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 
10. Robert C. (1957 - . Son of Richard C. and Eleanor Uhler, Jonestovm, Pa. 

9. Robert Dalton (1962 - . Son of Dalton W. and Susan Wellington, Fullerton, Calif. 

10. Robert David (l95l - . Son of Robert I. Jr. and Martha J. Davidson, Clarinda, la, 

9. Robert E. (1927 - m. Nila S. Bennett (1927 - 

Son of Ezra Rinehart and Myrtle Bordner (Rinehart). Took mother's maiden name 
when divorced. Steel-mill ■worker, near Myerstown, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). Children: 
Beverly Gale. 

9. Robert E. (1939 - Unmarried. 

Son of Roy E. and Virginia Lentz. Laborer, Williamstovn, Pa, (Dauphin Co.), 

9. Robert E. {l9Sh - . Son of Clifford F. and Alma G. Kemrer, Harrisburg, Pa. 

9. Robert Earl (1959 - . Son of Earl E. and Betty B. Sharp, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

8. Robert Edward (1925 - m. Helen Pasarkis (1923 - 

Son of Arleigh E. and Lela M. Westbrook. Truck driver, Chicago, 111. Veteran 
World War II - U. S, Navy. No children. 

8. Robert F. (1929 - m. 

Son of Fremont R. and Alice Lofgren. Lives in Alameda, Calif. In U. S. Army for 
three years. Children: Michael, Kenneth, Eve, Allison, Julie. 

9. Robert Francis (1963 - . Son of Virgil R. and Geraldine L. Hafner, near Attica, 0, 

9. Robert George (1929 - m. Gloria Hay Hornickell (1933 - 

Son of Lloyd P. and Elsie M, Schoffstall. Born in Minersville, Pa. (Schuylkill 
Co.). Laborer in Lebanon, Pa. Children: Rodney W. (cl958 - . 

8. Robert George (19UU - m, Patricia Rathf elder (cl9l45 - 

Son of George W. and Mary K. Eborg. Near Green Springs, Ohio (Sandusky Co.). 

8. Robert Harris' (1920 - m. Betty Stine (1935 - 

Son of Robert 0. and Edith M, Harris. Born in Massillon, Ohio. Bacteriologist, 
U. S. Gov't., Denver, Colo. Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Sgt, 
Children: Beth Robin, Barrie Leigh. 

8. Robert Hurrel (1928 - m. Bonnie Lee Johnson (1929 - 

Son of George S. and Nell M. Hurrel. Born in Kansas City, Mo. Painting contract- 
or, Raytovm, Mo. Veteran World War II (Maritime service). Children: Gregory Lee, 
Randy Hurrel. 

8. Robert Immanuel (I89I - 19lO) - m. Frances Comfort (I883 - 

Son of William L. and Retta H. Reisner. Born in Independence, Iowa. Onetime 
farmer, grain and lumber dealer. Brock, Saskatchewan, Canada. Veteran World 
War I - Canadian Army - Sgt. Later, banker in Lament and Hudson, Iowa. Child- 
ren: Frances Jean (Braley), Robert Immanuel. Widow lives in Shenandoah, Iowa. 

186 



J 



PART B - REGISTER O F BORDNBR MALES AND T HE IR FAMILIES 

9. Robert Immanuel Jr. (I9?h - 1961) - m. Martha Jean Davidson (cl925 - 

Son of Robert I. and Frances Comfort. Born in Lamont, Iowa. Lived in Clarinda, 
Iowa. Widow still lives there. Children: Mary Kathryn, Robert David. 

6. Robert J. (l865 - ? ) - m. Elizabeth Bitner (1865 - ? ) 

Son of Benjamin and Mary Ann Enterline. Born in Berrysburg, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 
Machinist in Philadelphia, Pa. Children: Laura L. (only one known). 

8. Robert James (1919 - m. Audrey Seay (1923 - 

Son of Jtoy J. and Margaret England. Bom in Kokomo, Ind. Letter carrier. High- 
land Springs, Va. Also drives Airport bus, Richmond airport. Lives in Sandston, 
Va. Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Sgt. Children: Roberta Jeanne, 
Elizabeth Louise, Roy Jay, Jacqueline Jeanette. 

9. Robert James (1958 - . Son of Thomas W. and Marguerite L, Pavonarius, Toledo, 0. 

10. Robert Jeffrey (1958 - . Son of Daniel R. and Betty E. Rose, Sunbury, Pa. 

7. Robert John (1919 - m. Lola Dell Fisher (1919 - 

Son of William H. and Bessie L. Shanklin. Farmer, near Cutler, Ind. (Carroll 
Co.). Children: Robert Lynn, Rebecca Lenore (Hawkins), John Thomas. 

8. Robert Larry (19U6 - . Son of Ralph 0. and Mayme K. Bartlett, Tiffin, Ohio. 

7. Robert Lee (1909 - m. Greta Negley (1912 - 

Son of (Henry) Shannon and Franc L. Burgett. Born in Lewistown, 111. (Fulton 
Co.). Director of analysis and procedures, Seaboard Finance Co., Los Angeles, 
Calif. Lives in North Hollywood. Also lived in Fresno and San Francisco, Calif o 
Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy - Lt. Cdr. No children. 

8. Robert Lee (1929 - m. Nancy Anne Haberstroh (1932 - 

Son of Leo E. and Jeannette Sorg. Bom in Ft. Wayne, Ind. Bookkeeper, Albion, 
Ind. Children: Rhonda Marie, Robert Steven, Marc Allen, Jennifer Lynn. 

8. Robert Leroy (1936 - m. Barbara Ann Englehart (l9Ul - 

Son of Graydon S. and Velma E. Harrer. Born in Bucyrus, Ohio. Joint owner and 
operator (with father) of The Herald Printing Company (weekly newspaper and job 
printing services). Children: Sharon Kay. 

8. Robert Lewis (1922 - m. Shirley Lillian Moreland (1923 - 

Son of Moses and Ethel Michaels. Born in Chicago, 111. Printing plant supervisor, 
Sycamore, 111. Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Sgt. Children: Roberta 
Louise (Olson), Craig James. 

8. Robert Lynn (19U2 - m. Jacqueline Lee Garrison (19U2 - 

Son of Robert J. and Lola D. Fisher. Bom in Flora, Ind. (Carroll Co.). In U.S. 
Arny - Staff Sgt. No children. 

7. Robert Otis (l895 - m. Edith M. Harris (l895 - 

Son of Finley B. and Clara J. Krisher. Partner in P. J. Bordner & Co., Inc. 
(food stores), Massillon, Ohio. Children: Robert Harris, Carol Joyce (Miller). 

187 



PAR T B - R EGISTER OF RORDNER MALES AND X^^IA JM^m^ 

8. Robert Paul {1926 - m. Antoinette L. Eviertz (1930 - 

Son of (Clarence) Paul and Anna Potter. Rural mail carrier, Bennett, Colo. Vet- 
eran World War II - U. S. Army - Sgt. Children: Janet Kay, Joan Kathleen, Nancy 
Annette. 

7. Robert Peter (l88l - I9I4I) - m. Agnes Fidler (lS85 - 1966) 

Son of William J. and Emma L. Dundore. Farmer in Bethel Twp. and Tulpehocken 
Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Children: Calvin P., Mary M. (Long). 

9. Robert Russell (1931 - 1919). Son of Lawrence M. Sr. and Phyllis J. Freidag, 

Freeport, 111. 

10. Robert Russell II (1953 - . Son of Philip C. and Doris J. Bloompott, Hurst, Tex. 

7. Robert Simon (I893 - I963) - m. Jeanette von Mengeringhausen (I896 - 

Son of Jerome M. and Mary A. Horstick. Born in Palmyra, Pa. Dentist, Lancaster, 
Pa. Also lived in Collegeville, Pa. and Maitland, Fla . (Originally named"r>imon 
Robert".) Children: Jeanne Marie (Dill), Robert Simon, Craig Miller, Richard 
Jerome. Widow lives in Maitland, Fla. 

8. Robert Simon Jr. (1922 - m. Gladys May Yohn (1923 - 

Son of Robert S. and Jeanette von Mengeringhausen. Born in Lancaster, Pa. 
Administrator, Public Schools, North Bend, Oregon. Veteran World War II - U.S. 
Navy. Children: Martha Sue, Robert Simon III. 

9. Robert Simon III (196h - . Son of Robert S. Jr. and Gladys M. Yohn, North Bend, Ore., 

9. Robert Steven (195U - . Son of Robert L. and Nancy A. Haberstroh, Albion, Ind. 

8. Robert Usher (1917 - 1953) - m. Elizabeth Olson (cl917 - 

Son of Charles E. and Sarah Usher. Born in Delmont, S. D. Worked in lumber mills 
in South Dakota and Oregon. Died in Sweethome, Ore. Veteran World War II - U. S. 
Arny - Sgt. Children: Jan Robert, Dyann Kay. 

8. Robert Walter (1919 - m. Lena M. Lentz (cl920 - 

Son of Ralph C. and Alice E. Meyers. Born in Lebanon, Pa. Welder, Cleona, Pa. 
(Lebanon suburb). Children: Robert Walter, Shelby Jean (Bord), Sandra Louise 
(Carpenter). 

9. Robert Walter Jr. (19U5 - m. Frances K. Delp (19U6 - 

Son of Robert W. and Lena M. Lentz. Ass't. advertising manager - retail store, 
Lebanon, Pa. Children: Robert VJalter III. 

10. Robert Walter III (1963 - . Son of Robert Walter Jr. and Frances K. Delp. 

8. Robert William (I92h - m. Esther L. Garrado (1938 - 

Son of Lloyd E. and Opal T. Liggett. Bom in Plymouth, Ind. In U. S. Navy (in- 
cluded World War II). Lives in Alameda, Calif. Also lived in Santa Ana, Calif, 
and in Guam. Children: Elizabeth Joana, Robert William II, Steven Vincent. 

9. Robert William II (I96I - . Son of Robert W. and Esther L. Garrado. 

9. Robert William (1956 - . Son of Harold B. and Lois A. Birmingham, Canoga Park, Cal. 

188 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THBIR FAMILIES 

9. Robert Wilson (1927 - m. Donna Mae Savage (1930 - 

Son of Wilson and Aria I. Nehrboss. Electrician, Crittenden, N. Y. Children: 
Jame s , Jo hn . 

9. Roderick James (I9l49 - . Son of Maurice and Loretta Brenneman, Canton, 111. 

8. Rodney (19U3 - m. (l) Carol J. Baldwin (19U3 - ; (2) Patricia Ann Simpson (I9h3- 
Son of Lyle W. and Faye Eding. Construction worker. Holt, Mich. Children: (l) 
Jeffrey Scott; (2) None. 

10. Rodney W. (cl958 - . Son of Robert G. and Gloria M. Homickell, Lebanon, Pa. 

8. Roger Irving (1933 - m. Shirley Radway (cl933 - 

Son of Thoburn E. and Miriam L. Griffith. Factory foreman, Grafton, Ohio. No 
children. 

8. Roger J. (i960 - 1965). Son of Paul D. and Mary G. R. Herb, near Herndon, Pa. 

7. Roland Lee (1928 - m. Doris Arlene Harris (1933 - 

Son of Paul R. and Rose K. Woods. Born in Kansas City, Mo. In U. S. Navy. Home, 
Houston, Tex. Children: Miriam Rose, Vicki Lynn, Jeffrey Roland, Cindy Lee. 

7. Roland Delbert (1897 - 1933) - m. Oma Harlan (cl900 - 

Son of William S. and Polly Ann Hoch. Born in Stanton, Nebr. Bank teller, 
Compton, Calif. No children. 

9. Ronald (cl950 - . Son of Carl J. and Gladys Carpenter, Battle Creek, Mich. 
9. Ronald (1961 - . Son of Earl R. and Jane Evans, Dakota, 111. 

8. Ronald Allen (19U6 - . Son of Paul E. and Edith Myers, Port Clinton, Ohio. 

8. Ronald Dean (1929 - m. Ocie May Ewing (cl929 - 

Son of Guy and Ellen Gates. Born in Mishawaka, Ind. Long-distance furniture 
mover. South Bend, Ind. Children: Ronald Dean, Diana Louise, Stephen Eugene. 

9. Ronald Dean Jr. (19U7 - . Son of Ronald D. and Ocie M. Ewing, South Bend, Ind. 

9. Ronald Deane (1955 - . Son of George W. Jr. and Lucille Vernier, Louisville, 0. 

9. Ronald Edwin (19U2 - m. Sandra Lee Jones (19U3 - 

Son of Boy E. and Virginia Lentz. Butcher, near Lykens, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 
Children: Sandra Elaine, William Perry. 

9. Ronald J. (19U5 - . Son of Arthur J. and Carrie V. Graham, Temple, Pa. 

10. Ronald John (1956 - . Son of Weldon L. Jr. and Margie I. Booker, Hillsdale, Mich. 

10. Ronald William (19U3 - . Son of William H. and Marie W. Bower, Millersburg, Pa. 

7. Ross A. (cl890 - m. Minnie Ray (cl890 - 

Son of Henry P. and Margaret Arnett. Farmer, Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. 
Children: Margaret Jean (Welch), (Henry) Ray. 

189 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MAL ES AND TH EIR FAMILIES 

7. Ross C. (1902 - 19114). Son of James E. and Leoria S. McLcuth, Lewistown, 111. 

9. Ross Emery (19U3 - • m. Carol A. Snyder {I9h7 - 

Son of Roy E. and Virginia Lentz. Machinist, Lykens, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). 

Roy (also see Ray) 

7. Roy (1877 - 1883). Son of William H. and Anna E. Herr, Akron, Ohio. 

6. Roy (1886 - m. Blanche Gaye Carl (I889 - 1959) 

Son of Daniel and Amanda Shade. Funeral director, Montpelier, Ohio. Children: 
Willard Gayle. 

6. Roy Cecil (1886 - 1925) - m. (1^ Nellie VJalden (I886 - cl920); (2) (ina) May 
Parker (I893 - . Son of Jeremiah (Jerry) and Sabina Hull. Farmer in Liberty 
Twp., Wood Co., Ohio. Children: (1) Leonard Melvin; (2) None. Widow lives in 
Bowling Green, Ohio. 

6. Roy Clayton (I88U - 19U3) - m. Daisy Hilda Klahr (l89U - 1935) 

Son of Elijah and Susan Hossler. Bom in Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Railroad laborer. Reed Twp., Seneca Co.^ Toledo; and Bucyrus, Ohio. Children: 
Dale Roy, Earl Vernon. 

7. Roy E. (1913 - m. Elsie I. Wolfe (1920 - 

Son of Dorsey A. and Maude A. Lubold. Born in Washington Twp., Northumberland 
Co., Pa. Steel-mill machinist; lives near Linglestown, Pa. (Dauphin Co.) Child- 
ren: Marlin William, Arlene Romaine (Hess), Barbara Diane, David Lee, Steven Ray. 

8. Roy Edward (I898 - 1965) - m. (l) (Catherine) Pauline Wike (I898 - 1931); (2) 

Virginia Emeline Lentz (1912 - . Son of Elmer Chauncey and Alice J. Rheam, 
Born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Laborer and truck-driver; lived near 
Loyalton, Pa. and other places in Dauphin Co. Children: (l) William Elmer, Roy 
Edward Jr., May Esther (Johnston), (Mary) Elizabeth (Warfel), Jerry Elwood, 
Melvin Claude, Alice Jane (Bordner), Frank, William Henry; (2) June Marie 
Virginia Catherine (Srryder), Richard E., Ralph Eugene, Robert E., Raymond Edgar, 
Ronald Edwin, Ross Emery, Teriy Lee, Widow lives near Loyalton, Pa. 

9. Roy Edward Jr. (1918 - m. June Franzese Ballettee (1923 - 

Son of Roy E. and Pauline VJike. Laborer, Harrisburg, Pa. Also lived in Washing- 
ton, D. C. Veteran World War II - U. S. Arny. Children: John Wilbur, Elmer 
Chauncey, Gertrude Renee, Dana Scott, Dannette Jolynn. 

7. Roy Jay (I88O - 19U8) - m. Margaret England (I886 - 1925) 

Son of Israel J. and Nancy M. Cook. Born in Brookston, Ind. Telephone lineman 
and serviceman, Kokomo, Ind. Children: George Kneal, Ellen E. (Martin), (Rich- 
ard) Kenneth, Charles Howard, Robert James. 

9. Roy Jay (19U7 - . Son of Robert J. and Audrey Seay, Sandston, Va. 

8. Roy Lamarr (1936 - m. Sandra Lee Clarke (19U3 - 

Son of William H. and Bernice L. Brown. Bom in Elkhart, Ind. Partner in Bordner 
& Sons Aluminum Foundry, St. Petersburg, Fla. No children. 

190 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDN ER MALE S AND THEIR FAM ILIES 

7. Roy Levi (1889 - 1921) - m. (l) Catharine Victoria Miller (1889 - ? ); (2) 
Catharine Stockert (cl900 - . Son of James Monroe and Emma Bachtel. Farmer 
near Canton, Ohio (Stark Co.). Children: (l) None; (2) Ralph Monroe. 

7. Roy Nelson (1908 - ra. Agnes George (cl910 - 

Son of Benjamin and Catharine Keiser. Born in Northumberland Co., Pa. Laborer 
in Northumberland County and nearby in Snyder Co. No children. 

8. Roy Oliver (1913 - 193U). Son of Otis M. and Levetah L. Shaw. Unmarried. Died in 

Norton, Kansas. 

7. Roy Oscar (1915 - ni. Joyce Alice Christensen (1922 - 

Son of Oscar F. and Sylvia A. Dugan. Born in Hugo, Okla. U. S. Post Office employ- 
ee, Los Angeles, Calif. Veteran World War II - U. S. Army - Corp. Children: 
Michael Anthony. 

8. Roy Owen (1922 - m. Mary Eleanor Seeley (cl922 - 

Son of Daine V. and Flora Gygax. Born in Honolulu, Hawaii. Construction contract- 
or, Seattle, Wash. Formerly in U. S. Navy, including World War II and Korean War 
- Lt. (retired). Children: Owen Steve, Charles Eoy, Janet Marie, Thomas Horace, 
Bret Seeley. 

6. Ruallen (l8hh - ? )• Son of Godfrey and Leah Riehl. Born in Tulpehocken Twp., 

Berks Co., Pa. Went West and never heard from thereafter. 

7. Russell (1916 - 1937 )• Son of John A. A. and Florence M. Robinson, Elysburg, Pa. 

7. Russell Clyde (1911 - m. Dorothy Margaret Lusk (1909 - 

Son of Harry C. and Nona Honsberger. Manager of A & P Store, Tiffin, Ohio. Child- 
ren: Beverly Ann (Ator), Joanne Louise (Kiiranel), Thomas Allen, William Edward. 

7. Russell David (1909 - m. Beulah M. Snyder (1912 - 

Son of Franklin (Frank) W. and Marzella Amer. Service -station operator, near 
Bolivar, Ohio (Tuscarawas Co.). Children: Russell William, Emmabelle, John 
Warren. 

8. Russell Denver (1908 - m. M. Genevera Davis (1910 - 

Son of Niles 0. and Bessie Jolly. Bom near Canton, Ohio. Operator of sporting- 
goods store, Wadsworth, Ohio. Lives in Seville, Ohio (Medina Co.). Veteran World 
war II - U. S. Army - Sgt. Children: Gerry ^lynn. 

7. Russell Lavern (1903 - m. Name unknown 

Son of George E. and Edna M. Stutsman. Born in York Twp., Elkhart Co., Ind. 
Herdsman on dairy farm near New Richmond, Wise. Children: An adopted daughter, 
name unknown. 

8. Russell Monroe (1901 - m. Valerie Bertille Cummings (1902 - 

Son of Charles L. and Nettie E. Folgate. Born in Fort Dodge, Iowa. Also lived 
in Freeport, 111. Staff supervisor. 111. Bell Telephone Co., Chicago, 111. 
Lives in Barrington, 111. No children. 

191 



PART B - REGISTFR OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMIL IES 

8. Russell William (I9I4O - m. Nancy Elizabeth Overton (I9I4O - 

Son of Russell D. and Beulah M. Snyder. Born in Canton, Ohio. Blue-print control 
clerk, near Dover, Ohio. Also lived near Bolivar and New Philadelpia, Ohio, (all 
Tuscarawas Co.). Children: Tracie Kae, Russell William Jr. 

9. Russell William Jr. (I961t - . Son of Russell W. and Nancy E. Overton, Dover, Ohio. 

6. Ruvalon Jefferson (l855 - 1929) - m. Sarah Ann Schrader (cl857 - 1916) 

Son of William and Sarah Ann Snyder. Born in Plain Twp., Stark Co., Ohio. Farmer 
in Whitley Co., Ind. (near Columbia). Children: William Albert, Edith E. (Hatha- 
way), Earl Raymond. 

9. Ryan Michale (1958- . Adopted son of Max W. and Callye M. Palermo, Springfield, Mo. 

5. Samuel (I8UU - 1926) - m. Leanna Stout (iSUia - 1908) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Kocher. Laborer and farmer, Venice Twp., Seneca Co., Ohio; 
Pleasant Tv:p., Henry Co.; Chatfield Twp. and near Tiro in Cravford Co., Ohio. 
Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. H, 123rd Ohio Inf. Children: Will jam Harvey, Noah 
Bartholomew, Mary A., Harrison Andrew (Harry), Milo Alvon, Ida Bell (Ritzhaupt), 
Jerry Elwood, Mary Ellen (Wittel), Dessa (Bonnen), Daniel Ervin. 

5. Samuel (l8li7 - 1919) - m. Rosanna Heckel (cl650 - 1916) 

Son of Peter and Anna Maria Hepner. Farm laborer and blacksmith in and near 
Herndon, Pa. (Northumberland Co.). Children: Mary Alice (Kitzmiller), Gertrude 
(Dunkelberger), Sarah (Bait), Rosa L. (Stineman - Irvin). 

7. Samuel (l859 - 1929) - m. Letticie Boals (I868 - 1955) 

Son of David and Jane Irwin. Farmer in Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. Child- 
ren: Clarence, Ruth. 

8. Samuel (1958 - . Son of William I. and Betty Girton, Danville, Pa. 

7. Samuel A. (I883 - m. Rosa Yerges (l892 - 

Son of Daniel and Amanda Rummel. Farmer and carpenter near Halifax, Pa. (Dauphin J 
Co.). Children: Clifford Franklin, Ernest A,, Ida Mae (Rudy), Samuel Daniel, ' 
Lester Eugene, Dean Edward. 

8. Samuel Daniel (192U - ra. (l) June J. Enders (1928 - ; (2) Elaine Cupp (I93I4 - 

Son of Samuel A. and Rosa Yerges. Born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Machine-shop foreman, Harrisburg, Pa. Children: (l) None; (2) David Scott. 

8. Samuel Dawson (I898 - 19U2) - m. Violet Wilhelm (1901 - 

Son of Grant and Annie V. Sherk. Bom in Swatara Twp., Lebanon Co., Pa. Tin- 
smith in Paln^ra, Pa. Also employed at one time in chocolate plant, Hershey, Pa. 
Children: Warren Wayne, Karl Wilbur. 

6. Samuel Thomas (1856 - 1931) - m. Annie M. Burkhart (I867 - 1933) 

Son of Thomas L, and Melinda Schneider. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa, 
Justice of the Peace, Bernville and Wernersville, Pa, (Berks Co.). Children: 
Thomas B., Margaret Melinda, Catherine. 

192 



bi 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. Samuel Thomas (l865 - 19k9) - m. Ida Louella Eby (1869 - 19U3) 

Son of Levi and Mary Bright. Farmer and painter near or in Plymouth, Ind. Child- 
ren: Or la Samuel, (Mary) Elizabeth (Long), Avarilla Mae (Snoke), Amza Levi, Lloyd 
Ellsworth, Earl, Cleo Louella (Clark), Veto, Ora Thomas. 

8. Samuel Thomas (1901 - 19$6) - m. Dorothy E. Miller (I9l8 - 

Son of Thomas D. and Emma R. Meek. Foundry worker, Tilden Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
Children: Sylvester Samuel, Helen Laura, Edwina Charlene, 

6. Samuel Trego (I863 - 19U3) - m. Emeline (Emma) Haidle (l865 - 1908) 

Son of Einanuel and Mary Ann Trego. Born in Chapman Twp., Snyder Co., Pa. Lumber 
and grain dealer, Pilger, Nebr. Children: Hazel Dora (Cooper), Franklin Glen, 
Leland Stanford, Mildred E. (Tilley), Gertrude M. (Chace), Helen V. (Schmidtman) . 

7. Sanford (l875 - 1951) - m. Anna Beck (I88O - 1951) 

Son of William and Lavinia Fell. Born in Town of layette, N.Y. Barber, Batavia, 
N.Y. Children: Wilson, Gladys (Palone), Lester, Carl, Helen (O'Geen). 

7. Scott (cl891 - 1958) - m. Ethel Tanner (l893 - 1961) 

Son of George and Minnie Hummel. Born in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. 
State policeman, Lewistown, 111. Children: Eloise (Richards), George Tanner. 

9. Scott Allen (1961 - Son of Bobbie 0. and Kathiyn A. Reed, Herndon, Pa. 

10. Scott Paul (1957 - . Son of Paul L. and Jane I. Paul, Janesville, Wise. 
9. Scott Paul (1961 - . Son of Douglas P. and Shirley A. Reed, Attica, Ohio. 

9. Scott Steven (1959 - I96I4). Son of George C. and Patricia L, Ervan, Canton, Ohio. 

9. Scott William (I96U - . Son of (Joseph) William and Carolyn S. Marley, Cutler, Ind. 

6. Serenas John (l8IiU - 1915) - m. Maria E. ____^_ (I8UU - 1932) 

Son of Thomas and Maria . Huckster in Millersburg (now Bethel), Pa. (Berks 

Co.). Children: Elizabeth Elvey (Schaeffer), Clinton Ray. 

6. (Henry) Shannon (I876 - I9I4I) - m. FrancLouise Burgett (I883 - 1958) 

Son of Moses and Margaret Ewers. Hardware merchant, Lewistown, 111. (Fulton Co.). 
Children: Margaret Estelle (Osborn), Charles Leslie, Robert I^e. 

7. Sherman E. (I889 - 1959) - m. Ola Trylba McCormick (1895 - 

Son of William H. and Delia Bigelow. Railroad foreman. Grand Island, Nebr. and 
Chillicothe, Ohio. Children: Marjorie Louella (Wise), Dale E. 

7. (VJilliam Penn Agassus) Sherman Godell (I88O - 1937) - m. Ada Nickle (cl885 - 
Son of (William) Henry Harrison and Hannah S.O.J. Gross. Painter in Shamokin 
Dam, Pa. Children: Marjorie (Bordner), Thelma V. (Trutt). 

6. Solomon (I835 - i860) - m. Catharine Bordner (l835 - ? ) 

Son of Thomas and Maria . Wife, daughter of Daniel and Anna Maria Tobias. 

Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. No known children. 

193 



PART B - REGISTER OF BCRDNKR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. Solomon (cl839 - cl89l) - m. Elizabeth A. Willard (cl839 - I917) 

Son of Philip and Readle. Born in Stark Co. or VJayne Co., Ohio. Farmer 

in Stafford and Wilmington Tvps.j De Kalb Co., Ind. Children: Wilson M.,Cormon J. 

7. Solomon (i860 - 186_). Son of David and Jane Irwin, Stephenson Co., 111. 

8. Stanley (190? - 1915). Son of Walter A. and Bertha Bettilyou, Peru, Ind. 

8. Stanton Noecker (1905 - 1966) - m. Mabel V. Campbell (1913 - 

Son of Dr. David Stanton and Ida E. Noecker. Born in Mt. Aetna, Pa. (Berks Co.) 
and raised in Palmyra, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). Dentist, Harrisburg, Pa. and Atlanta, 
Ga. Veteran of World War II - U. S. krmy Medical Corps - Col. With U. S. Veter- 
ans' Administration following World War II - Director of Supervising Field 
Dental Services, Washington, D. C. when he died. Children: David Stuart, Diane 
Carolyne. Widow lives in Atlanta, Ga. 

7. Stanton W. (I88I - 195h) - m. Laura P. Metherell (cl882 - ? ) 

Son of Jacob and Rebecca Zeller. Shoemaker in Lebanon, Pa. Moved to Pittsburg, 
Calif. No children. 

Stephen (also see Steven) 

8. Stephen Eugene (I9ii9 - . Adopted son of Eugene E. and Mildred J. Stewart, 

Alexandria, Va. 

9. Stephen Eugene (1950 - . Son of Ronald D. and Ocie M. Ewing, South Bend, Ind. 
9. Stephen Harold (1950 - . Son of Lyle M. and Helen E. Green, Pinellas Park, Fla. 
9. Stephen Kane (l96l - . Son of Kane G. and Madeline M. Hanson, Omaha, Nebr. 

8. Stephen Michael (19U8 - . Son of William H. and Susan Labadie, Concord, Calif. 

7. Stephen Oscar (I876 - 19Uii) - m. Annie Baer (cl878 - 1951) 

Son of Daniel J. K. and Rufina Lerch. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
Butcher in Myerstown, Pa. (Lebanon Co.). No children. 

9. Stephen William (1959 - . Son of George N. Jr. and Shelby J. Graybill, Snyder Co,, 

Pa. 

10. Steven E. (1959 - . Son of Thomas E. and Lenita Johnson, near Freeport, 111. 

8. Steven Edward (1955 - . Son of George W. and Reba J. Basom, Camp Hill, Pa. 

9. Steven Patrick (195U - . Son of George T. and McKenna, Lewistown, 111. 

9. Steven Tl. (1952 - . Son of Raymond B. and Bernice A. Mattern, near Dornsife, Pa. 
8. Steven R. (1959 - 1965). Son of Paul D. and Mary G. R. Herb, near Herndon, Pa. 

8. Steven Ray (195U - . Son of Boy E, and Elsie I. Wolf, near Linglestown, Pa. 

9. Steven Ray (1955 - . Son of Harold E. and Patricia M. Huston, Farmington, 111. 

19U 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 
9. Steven Vincent (1962 - . Son of Robert W. and Esther L. Garrado, Alameda, Calif. 

8. Steven W. (195U - . Son of William W. Jr. and Barbara Hafen, Great Falls, Mont. 

6. Sylvester (1893 - 1918) Unmarried 

Son of Elijah and Susan Hossler. Bom in Ghatfield T-wp., Crawford Co., Ohio and 
lived in Reed Twp., Seneca Co., Ohio. Died in service in Vforld War I - U.S. Army. 

9. Sylvester Samuel (1935 - Unmarried 

Son of Samuel T, and Dorothy E. Miller. Plumber, Hamburg, Pa. (Berks Co.). 

8. Terrance Jennings (1895 - m. Beatrice B. Thomas (l895 - 

Son of Charles L. and Nettie E. Folgate. Born in Nodaway Co., Mo. Insurance 
agent and broker, Freeport, 111. Veteran World War I - U. S. Army - Sgt. 
Children: Eleanor Mae (Rolinger), Belva Jean (Burke), (Merrill) Thomas. 

9. Terry Gene (i960 - . Son of Gene H. and Florence A. Shipe, near Shamokin, Pa, 

9. Terry Lee (I9UI4 - cl9UU) • Son of Roy E. and Virginia E. Lentz, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

10. Terry Lee (1956 - . Son of Melvin C. and Nancy L. Sims, Harrisburg, Pa. 

8. Terry Lyle (19U6 - m. Bonnie Van Epps (19U6 - 

Son of Lyle W. and Faye Eding. Factory employee, Oldsmobile Motors, Lansing, 
Mich. Lives in Holt, Mich. Children: Denise Michelle. 

9. Terry Ross (1951 - . Son of Merle B. and Bonnie Peck, Roseville, Mich. 

6. Theodore (1862 - 1906) Unmarried 

Son bf Percival and Lovina Miller, Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Laborer 
in Lebanon Co., Pa. 

7. Thoburn Emerson (I908 - m. Miriam L. Griffith (1909 - 

Son of Daniel E. and Merle Spillette. Bom in Auburn Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. 

Carpenter, Cleveland, Ohio. Also lived in other places in Ohio, Florida, and 

Texas. Veteran World War II - U. S. Arny - Sgt. Children: James Emerson, David 
Howard, Roger Irving, Victoria K. 

5. Thomas (I809 - I883) - m. Maria (cl8ll - cl875) 

Son of John and Elizabeth Hoffman. Hatter in Millersburg (now Bethel), Pa. (Berks 
Co.). Children: Delilah, Solomon, Elizabeth, Serenus John. 

9. (Merrill) Thomas (192? - m. Patricia Sellke (1930 

Son of Terrance J. and Beatrice B. Thomas. Instrument repair-man, near Freeport, 
111. Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: Vicki Lee, Lynn Dianne, Lisa 
Ann. 

8. Thomas Allen (19U0 - m. Mary Jane Giambruno (19U3 - 

Son of Russell C. and Dorothy M. Lusk. Electrician, National Machinery Co., 
Tiffin, Ohio. Children: Tracy I^ynn, Patrick Thomas. 

195 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Thomas B. (1903 - m. Charlotte Westerhoff (cl900 - 

Son of Samuel T. and Annie M. Burkhart. Real estate and insurance broker, Wern- 
ersville. Pa. (Berks Co.). Former mathematics teacher in high schools. Also 
lived in Bernville, Pa. (Berks Co.). No children. 

7. Thomas David (1875 - 1932) m. Emma R. Meek (l879 - 193U) I 

Son of William J. and Emma L. Dundore. Born in Bethel T-wp., Berks Co., Pa. Farm- I 
er in Tilden Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Children: Clarence William, Samuel Thomas, 
Bertha E. (Reider - Althouse), John, Ammon E. 

7. Thomas E. (l879 - 1956) - m. Mary Emma Stoneroad (cl878 - 1956) , 

Son of Daniel and Amanda Rummel. Born in Jefferson Tvjp,, Dauphin Co., Pa. Shoe- 
maker, miner, and laborer in Dauphin Co. and in Buffalo, N. Y. Children: Oscar, 
Lloyd . 

9. Thomas E. (cl930 - m. Lenita Johnson (cl930 - 

Son of Clarence and Martha Erickson. Born in Dakota T-wp., Stephenson Co., Ill, 
Farmer near Freeport, 111. Children: Steven E., Richard Jon, Rebecca Sue. 

9. Thomas Eldon (I9l4h - 1957). Son of Vlayne E. and Alta Hart, Montpelier, Ohio, 

8. Thomas Franklin (19U? - . Son of Ralph 0. and Mayme K. Bartlett, Tiffin, Ohio. 

9. Thomas G. (1955 - • Son of Raymond B. and Bernice A. Mattern, near Dornsife, Pa. 

9. Thomas Horace (1953 - • Son of Roy 0. and Mary E, Seeley, Seattle, Wash. 

5. Thomas L. (18?U - 1899) - m. Melinda Schneider (I83O - 1915) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine Lerch. Farmer in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Inher- 
ited part of farm originally acquired by his great grandfather, Jacob," from 
the Proprietors in I76I. Children: William Jacob, Cyrus Peter, Samuel Thomas, 
Adaline Catherine, Mary Melinda, Francis Albert, Rebecca Sarah, John Henry, 
Charles Levi, George Calvin, Ellen Nora. 

7. Thomas Lyle (1900 - Unmarried 

Son of (Oliver) Perry and Sarah Brovm. Born in Lewistovjn Twp., Fulton Co., Ill, 
Machinist, Peoria, 111. 

8. Thomas Michael (1958 - . Son of William J. and Barbara J. Scheller, Snyder Co., Pa. 

8. Thomas Noel (19U? - . Son of Ray and Dorothy Keeney, Quaker Hill, Conn. J' 

8. Thomas Otto (19U5 - • Son of Glen and La Moile Scheiber, Mishawaka, Ind. In 
military service. 

7. Thomas Quinton (19?9 - m. Florence L. Martz (cl928 - 

Son of Dorsey A. and Maude A. Lubold. Factory worker, near Dalmatia, Pa. (North- 
umberland Co.). Children: Thomas Quinton, Jeffrey Allen, Sheila Loraine. 

8. Thomas Quinton Jr. (cl950 - . Son of Thomas Q. and Florence L. Martz. 

10, Thomas Robert (1957 - . Son of Richard E. and Evelyn P. Berry, Massillon, Ohio. 

196 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Thomas Whalen (1923 - m. Marguerite Lillian Pavonarius (1922 - 

Son of Arnold B. and Coletta J. Curtzwiler. Foreman, Toledo Sanitary District, 
Toledo, Ohio. Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Sgt. Children: Grace Mae, 
Frederick Arnold, Robert James. 

7. Thomas William (I9l6 - ra. Agnes E. O'Brien (Waterman) (1920 - 

Son of Austin E. and Clara Cooper. Railroad dispatcher, Philadelphia, Pa. No 
children, apparently. 

7. Tilden (I876 - ? ) - m. Mable Mary Strausser (cl880 - ? ) 

Son of Isaac J. H. and Amelia L. Wolfersberger. Born in Tulpehocken Twp. , Berks 
Co., Pa. Druggist, Philadelphia, Pa. No children. 

7. Tilon Darias (I87I4 - ? ) - m. Cora Myers (cl875 - ? ) 

Son of Tilon J. and Rebecca Schreffler. Born in Tulpehocken Tvrp., Berks Co., Pa. 
Farmer, public-school teacher, and Railway Mail clerk. Last known to be living 
in Williamsport, Pa. Children: One who died in infancy, name unknown. 

6. Tilon Jacob (l8U2 - ? ) - m. Rebecca Schreffler (I8U3 - ? ) 

Farmer and blacksmith in Tulpehocken Twp. and Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Son 
of Augustus L. and Henrietta (Harriet) Moyer. Children: Emma Naomi (Mills), 
Elizabeth Alice ( Ellenberger), Hai*vey Albert, Tilon Darias, Ida Rebecca (Fisher), 
Margaret Maria, Bstella M. (Hershey). 

10. Tim Lee (I96O - . Son of Ernest E. and Alma J. Strohecker, Herndon, Pa. 

9. Timothy (cl9l5 - . Son of (James) Luther E. and Betty M. Wertz, Millersburg, Pa. 
9. Timothy (cl955 - . Adopted son of William A. and Opal De Freese,V.'inter Haven, Fla. 

8. Timothy (1958 - . Son of Viilliara H. and Susan Labadie, Concord, Calif. 

9. Timothy Alan (1958 - . Son of Donald E. and Olga J. Kozlow, Posen, 111. 

8. Timothy Dugan (l95l - . Son of Earl C. and Smily A. Bacon, Pomona, Calif. 

9. Timothy G. (1958 - . Son of George H. and Eleanor M. Wilhelm, Bethel, Pa, 

8. Timothy James (I96O - . Son of Harry S. and Jean Arlene Napp, Middletown, Pa. 

9. Timothy Mark (1950 - . Son of James E. and Patricia A. Mershing, Gaylord, Mich. 

8. Titus Leroy (1922 - m. Edith June Lenig (cl922 - 

Son of Clarence E. and Mary E. Reich. Born near Mt. Pleasant Mills, Pa. (Snyder 
Co.). Carpenter, Harrisburg and Sunbury, Pa. Veteran World War II - U. S. Army. 
Children: Richard Leroy, Jean Esther, June Grace, Leslie Joan, Susan Jane, 
Barry Bruce, Jeanette Gail, Pamela Elizabeth, Nancy Carol. 

9. Todd Richard (1963 - . Son of Carroll R. and Joyce A. Overholser,Bringhurst,Ind. 

6. Tody (sp.?) Sedeias (l859 - ? )• Son of Isaac and Maria Gergins, Lebanon Co., Pa. 
No record after i860. 

197 



PART B - REG ISTER OJ_BO ro^^BR j^lALES_MD THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Tolan (189U - m. (l) Mabel Prose (l893 - ; (2) Magdalena Gatz (l891 - 

Son of James E. and Leoria S. McLouth. Born in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. 
Stock-buj'-er and trucker, Lewistown, 111. and Delavan, Wise. Lives in Darien, Wise. 
Children: (l) Winifred (Blodgett - Johnson), Berlyn L., James E., Marjorie R. 
(Willoughby); (2) None. 

6. Tracy L. (I896 - m. Janet Shaw (1910 - 

Son of Levi and Mary Jane Waller. Born in Crawford Co., Ohio. Railroad conductor. 
Lives in Largo, Fla. No children. 

7. Vaiden C. (I886 - 19l8) - m. Neva Smith (I887 - 1961) 

Son of William G. and Mary J. Lesley. Probably born in North Manchester, Ind. 
Tool-and-die maker, Coldwater, Mich. Children: Vernon Albert, Fern (Nufer). 

7. Valentine Clinton (1882 - ? ). Died young. Son of Jacob and Rebecca Zeller, 

Bethel, Pa. 

8. Verne St. Patrick (1905 - 1961^) - m. Cathrene Elling (cl905 - 

Son of Viilliam L. and Retta H. Reisner. Born in Independence, Iowa. Lived in 
Chicago, 111. No children. Widow lives in Chicago. 

8. Vernon Albert (1907 - m. Mary Ann Lyczynski (1907 - 

Son of Vaiden C. and Neva Smith. Machinist, South Bend, Ind. Also lived in Cold- 
water, Mich. Children: Sheila June. 

6. Vernon Ellsworth (I887 - 1965) - m. (l) Cleo Mary Collins (I887 - 19hU); (?) 

Belle Colvin (Bennison) (I89I - . Son of Levi and Mary Jane Leister. Born in 
Lykens Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. Farmer near Lykens, Green Springs, and Sycamore, 
Ohio (Crawford, Sandusky, and Wyandot Counties). Children: (l) Glenn Allen, Adah 
(Bartlfitt), Ralph Oliver, Jane (Ford), Darl Eugene, George William, Raymond Paul, 
Clarence, Mary Louise (Drown); (2) None. 

7. Veto (cl903 - CI903). Son of Samuel T. and Ida L. Eby, Plymouth, Ind. 

8. Victor Le Roy (1933 - 195U). Son of Ralph 0. and Mayme K. Bartlett, Tiffin, Ohio. 

10. Vincent Anthony (I96U - . Son of Donald R. and Judith H. White, Lebanon, Pa. 

8. Vincent K. (1922 - m. Lynette Scharlow (1922 - 

Son of Mark H. and Elsie R. Kaufman. Farmer, near Montpelier, Ohio. No children. 

7. Virgil Franklin (1909 - m. Jennie Butler (1917 - 

Son of Franklin N. and Lulu H. Calvin. Born in Henry Co. or Fulton Co., Ohio. 
Marina operating engineer, Jacksonville, Fla. Children: Louann Jean (Zoll), 
Logal Virgil, Lois Kay (Lei^is). 

8. Virgil Hugh (1930 - m. Phyllis Buck (1929 - 

Son of Glen and La Moile Scheiber. Tinner, Mishawaka, Ind. Children: Richard 
Lee, Connie Sue. 

7. Virgil Lester (I918 - m. Mae E. Price (I9l8 - 

Son of Lester and Jennie Moyer. Rubber-con^any employee, near Attica, Ohio. No 

children. 

198 



PART B - REGIS TER OF BORDNER KALKS AND TfffilR F AMILIES 

8. Virgil Richard (I93h - m. Geraldine L. Hafner (l9hl - 

Son of Walter A. and Esta M. Moyer. Farmer, near Attica, Ohio (Huron Co.). Child- 
ren: Robert Francis, Dennis Paul. 

7. Wade H. (l897 - 1950) - m. Garnett Standard (cl900 - 

Son of James E. and Leoria S. Mc Louth. Employee of 111. State Highway Dep't., 
Lewistown, 111. (Fulton Co.). Children: Hilda (Henkel), Virginia. 

7. Walter (1885 - 1959) Unmarried 

Son of Jacob and Rebecca Zeller. Ice-man, Lebanon, Pa, 

7. Walter A. (1879 - m. (l) Bertha Bettilyou (I878 - 1937); (2) Ruth Sublett (1910 - 
Alleged son of George F. and Albaretta Heckert. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., North- 
umberland Co., Pa. Monument dealer, Peru and Noblesville, Ind. Children: Stanley, 
Kathryn; (2) None. 

7. Walter Andrew (1910 - m. Esta M. Moyer (Detterman) (I898 - 

Son of Harry and Sarah Revert. Farmer near Attica, Ohio (Huron Co.). Children: 
Carroll Walter, Virgil Richard. 

7. Walter Jay (I883 - 1936) - m. Ella Cora Plattenberg (1892 - 

Son of John W. and Mary C. Bowers. Born in Jackson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Lived 
in Philadelphia. Children: Ella May (Vanderhar). Widow lives in Philadelphia. 

7. Walter Nelson (1900 - I96U) - m. (l) Helen Clarabelle Lee (1901 - 19h6); (2) 
Gladys Marie Lee (1919 - . Son of Elza E. and Clara M. Zeigler. Born in Van 
Wert Co., Ohio. Truck driver. Ft. Wayne and Kendallville, Ind. Children: (l) 
Dan Dale; (2) None. Widow remarried and lives in Kendallville, Ind. 

7. Warren (cl921 - cl92l). Son of Franklin (Frank) W. and Marzella Arner, Bolivar, 0. 

6. Warren E. (1868 - 19h6) - m. Nellie Ault (I88O - I96I) 

Son of HenryH. and Catherine Metzger. Born in Burr Oak, Mich. Farmer and nursery- 
man, near Onawa, Iowa. Children: Helen (Bush), Wilma (McElwain), Kathryn (Claussen). 

8. Warren Paul (I9h2 - Unmarried 

Son of Vlilliam H. and Bernice L. Brown. Partner in aluminum foundry, Bordner & 
Sons, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

9. Warren Wayne (1928 - m. Elva A. Heisey (1928 - 

Son of Samuel D. and Violet Wilhelm. Owns and operates lumber yard. Palmyra, Pa. 
(Lebanon Co.). Children: Bruce Alan, Deborah Elaine, Suzanna Lee, Dean Scott. 

5. Washington (cl835 - cl8hO). Son of Jacob and Lydia Guest, Crawford Co., Ohio. 

6. (Benjamin) Watson (l85l - 1920) - m. Anna Hess (1858 - 1917) 

Son of Benjamin and Elizabeth . Laborer in Seneca Falls, N. Y. Child- 
ren: Albert, William Ellsworth, JuliaTBracht), Bertha (Servoss), Eva (Catlin). 

9. Wayne (1952 - . Son of Raymond E. and Maunda , Harney, La. 

199 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MAIES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Wayne Eldon (1909 - m. (l) Alta Hart (1917 - ; (2) Geraldine Kime (I9l5 - 

Son of Cloyd E. and Bnma Keppler. Farmer and factory worker, near l-bntpelier, 
Ohio. Children; (l) James De Wayne, Thomas Eldon; (2) None. 

8. Wayne Lorin (1927 - m. (l) Mary Ann Perry (cl927 - ; (2) Vesta 



1 



Son of William L. and Alice Newman. Probably born in Stark Co., Ohio. Plant 
foreman, near Kenton, Ohio. Veteran Vbrld War II - U. S. Navy. Children: (l) 
Debbie; (2) Sandy (daughter), Andy. 

7. Wayne Melvin (1922 - m. Lois Jeanne Kissler (192U - 

Son of Clyde M. and Dora E. Grimes. Born in Tiffin, Ohio. Sup't. of purchasing. 
General Electric Range Div., Louisville, Ky. Veteran World War II - U. S. I-larine 
Corps - 1st Lt. Children: V7ayne McKinley, Corine. 

9. Wayne Michael (1963 - . Son of Earl W. and Nancy H. Slater, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

8. Wayne McKinley (1950 - . Son of Wayne M. and Lois J. Kissler, Louisville, Ky. 

8. Wayne Richard (1933 - m. Shirley C. Clary (cl933 - 

Son of Paul J. and Eva Mae Ritter. Bom in Canton, Ohio. Public-utility em- 
ployee, Miami, Fla. Children: Cynthia Lee, Wayne Richard Jr. 

9. Wayne Richard Jr. (1958 - . Son of Wayne R. and Shirley C. Clary, Miami, Fla. 

8. Weldon La-Mar (1913 - m. (1) Inez McDonald (cl913 - ; (2) Marjorie Beamer (1919- 

Son of Howard E. and Frances Boisher. Born in Florence Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. 
Laboratory technician, Defiance, Ohio. Also lived in Montpelier and Paulding, 
Ohio and Angola, Ind. Veteran World War II - U. S. Army - Corp. Children: (1) 
Weldon La-Mar Jr., Larry Edgar; (2) None. 

9. Weldon La-Mar Jr. (193U - m. Margie Irene Booker (1933 - 

Son of Weldon La -Mar and Inez McDonald. Born in Montpelier, Ohio. Sup't. of 
Ready-Mix concrete plant, near Hillsdale, Mich. Children: Dennis Howard, Ronald 
John, Valerie Ann. 

7. Weldon Richard (1925 - m. Toshiko Kado (1925 - 

Son of Joseph and Gertrude E. Vandegriff. Born in Kimmel, Ind. (Noble Co.). In 
U. S. Air Force, including VJorld War II - Chief I'fester Sgt. Presently stationed 
in Madison, Wise. Children: Larry. 

7. Wesley J. (1859 - 193K) - m. Lillian Cornick (cl865 - ? ) 

Son of Henry and Caroline Boyer. Born in Buckeye Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
Farmer, Jesup, Iowa and near Waupaca, Wise. Children: Jay L. 

8. Wilbur (1900 - cl900). Son of William H. and Ada L. Paul, Akron, Ohio. 

8. Wilbur Amza (1915 - m. Betty Eherenman (1919 - 

Son of Amza L. and Flossie E. Kaufman. Born in Marshall Co., Ind. Owns and oper-. 
ates a garage, Plymouth, Ind. Children: Bruce Richard, Mauri Lee, Amee Maureen. 

7. Wilbur Joseph (1912 - m. Alice Schultz (1915 - 

Son of Oscar F. and Sylvia A. Dugan. Bom in Hugo, Okla. Supervisor, Terminal 
Annex, Los Angeles Post Office. Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy - Petty 
Officer. No children. 

200 ' 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THSIR F AMILIES 

7. Willard Gayle (1911 - m. (1) Beatrice Mae Haynes (cl913 - ; (2) Mary Margaretta 

Beck (1922 - . Son of Roy and Blanche G. Carl. Born in Montpelier, Ohio. Machin- 
ist and painter, Jonesville, Mich. Children: (1) Floyd Leroy, Herbert Eugene; 
(2) Willard James. 

8. Willard James (l9Ul - . Son of Willard G. and Mary M. Beck, Jonesville, Mich. 

3. William (cl757 - l8Ul) - m. (Mary) Elizabeth Koppenhofer (Koppenheffer)(l763-l82_) 
Son of Jacob and Sarah Bait. Born in Tulpehocken Settlement, Berks Co., Pa. 
Farmer in Upper Paxton Twp. (part now in Mifflin Twp.), Dauphin Co., Pa. In Penn- 
sylvania militia during Revolutionary War. Children: Elizabeth (Weiss or Weise), 
Susanna, Jacob, Anna Maria (Mary - Hartman), Catharine (Bitting), John Philip, 
Barbara (Nowinger - Peiffer), Michael, Daniel, (Eva) Christina (Orendorff), 
John, and perhaps one or two others, names unknown, who died in infancy. 

5. William (l82U - I898) - m. Susanna Runk (1833 - I889) 

Son of Jacob and Maria . Born in Mifflin or Lykens Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Farmer, Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: Jacob, Emeline, Philip, Sarah, 
Margaret, Mary, Elizabeth, James, James, Cora (Snyder), Susanna (Eyster), Lydia, 
Amanda, Ellen (Carl), Malinda (VJelker). 

5. William (l825 - 1912) - m. Sarah Ann Snyder (l837 - 1921) 

Son of Godfrey and Sarah Gasser. Born in Bethel Tvp., Berks Co., Pa. Farmer in 
Plain Twp., Stark Co., Ohio and Columbia Twp., Whitley Co., Ind. Children: 
Ruvalon Jefferson, Hettie Albaretta (Schrader), Sarah Elizabeth, Abbysena 
(Abbie - Ummel), William Godfrey, George Washington, John Henry, Minerva Alice 
(Seivers), Mary Ann, Charles Simon, Hannah Augusta (Brokaw), Mandilla May, 
Bessie Jane (Binkley). 

5. William (I828 - I9IU) - m. Caroline Huston (l835 - 1913) 

Son of John and Barbara Caninger. Born in Pike Twp., Stark Co., Ohio; raised in 
Chatfield Twp., Crawford Co., Ohio. Farmer in Flatrock Twp., Henry Co. and North- 
west Twp., Williams Co., Ohio, and in Hanover Twp., Jackson Co., Mich. Lived also 
in Cold Spring, Mo. Children: Catharine (Dunham), Bai-bara Ellen (Ella - Tomlinson), 
Mary A. (Thorne), Arminda (Minnie - Snow), Almeda (White), Emma (Walters - King - 
Murray), (John) William, Charles Franklin (Frank), Maude (Berry). 

5. William (l833 - 1857) Unmarried 

Son of Jacob and Magdalena Wolf. Born in Williamsville, N. Y. Also lived in Burr 
Oak, Mich. 

5. William (I836 - 1905) - m. Mary (Polly) Derrick (1839 - ? ) 

Son of Jonathan and Leah Kiehl. Farmer in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland Co., 
Pa. Children: Harriet (Wentzell), Sarah Catharine (Borrell), David A., Elizabeth 
(Dutery), William I., Leah Sofia (Sausser), Emma Jane (Gessner), John H., Ida 
Rebecca (Vought), Minnie Ames (Enders). 

6. William (18U2 - 1930) - m. Lavinia H. Fell (I8U6 - 1907) 

Son of Benjamin and Elizabeth . Farmer and labc'^er in Town of Fayette and 

Seneca Falls (Seneca Co.), N. Y. Children: Carrie Ulysses (Corry), Ada May, 
Sanf ord. 

7. William (I866 - I866). Son of Daniel T. and Sarah Weaber, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

201 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. (John) William (cl867 - cl890) - in. Lura Frazier (cl867 - ? ) 

Son of William and Caroline Huston. Born in Northwest Twp,, Williams Co., Ohio; 
also lived in Hanover Twp., Jackson Co., Mich. Railroad worker, Denver, Colo. 
Children: William. 

6. William (1868 - 1931) - m. Cora Jane Tarr (l873 - 1920) 

Son of Jacob and Sarah Coler. Fanner in Florence Twp., Williams Co., Ohio. Child- 
ren: Helena Jane (Sommers). 

7. William (cl890 - ? ). Son of (John) William and Lura Frazier, Denver, Colo. No 

information. 

8. (Joseph) William (1936 - 1965) - m. Carolyn Sue Marley (1938 - 

Son of William S. and Mary E. Mann. Farmer near Cutler, Ind. (Carroll Co.). 
Children: Susan Dee, Scott William. 

9. William (l9Ul - . Son of Pedro C. and Victorina Dacara, Zamboanga, Philippine 

Islands. No information. 

9. William (19U5 - . Son of Wilson E. and Connie Ward, Seattle, Wash. In U. S. Navy. 

6. William Adam (l86l - 19U5) - m. Minetta Grace Lambing (l873 - 1962) 

Son of Godfrey and Leah Riehl. Born in Tulpehocken Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Butcher 
and meat-cutter in Salina, Leechburg, and Saltsburg, Pa. Children: Gertrude 
Lydia, John Godfrey, Leah Mary, Alberta May (Keirn). 

7. William Albert (l88l - 1963) - m. Edith May Douglas (l889 - 

Son of Ruvalon J. and Sarah Ann Schrader. Recorder of Whitley Co., Ind., Colum- 
bia City. Also lived in South Whitley. Children: Juanita Henrietta (Vanderford), 
Kenneth Eugene. 

9. William Alan (19U8 - . Son of Glen W. and Juliana N. Bane, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

8. William Allen (1956 - . Son of George W. and Mary K. Eborg, near Green Springs, O.i 

8. William Andrew (1955 - . Son of William J. and Barbara J. Scheller, Snyder Co., Pa. 

8. William Augustus (1909 - m. (l) Jean Power (1909 - I960); (2) Opal De Freese 
(1912 - . Son of Ira J. and Kathryn Alkire. Owns and operates a retail lumber 
and building-supply business, Auburndale, Fla. Lives in Winter Haven, Fla. Born 
in Brookston, Ind. Children: (l) Nancy (Weaver); (2) None. Also two children 
adopted: Bruce, Timothy. 

7. William Benjamin (1912 - m. (l) Bertha Keifer (cl912 - ; (2) Florence E. Hand- 
ville (cl912 - . Born in Northumberland, Pa. Son of Benjamin and Catharine 
Keiser. Factory foreman, Danville, Pa. and Plainfield, N. J. Children: (l) John 
William; (2) None. 

7. William Boyd (1892 - m. Olive Fae Mayfield (1895 - 

Son of William S, and Polly Ann Hoch. Born in Pilger, Nebr. Banker, San Pedro, 
Calif. Children: Nan Marie (Hoeke), Harold Boyd. 

202 



PART B - REGISTER OF BCRDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. William C. (186? - 1926) - m. Christina Chester (1873 - 195U) 

Son of Daniel and Matilda Dressier. Salesman in Berrysburg and V/illiamstovin, Pa. 
(Dauphin Co.) Children: Harold, Sarah Chester (Graham), Dorothy E. (Hauck). 

9. William Charles (i960 - . Son of Charles S. II and Billie K. Kaho, Raytown, Mo. 

6. William Clement (l865 - 1931) - m. Addie Cooper (I87U - 19U5) 

Son of Alfred and Jane Hasson. Farmer in Lewistown Twp., Fulton Co., 111. Child- 
ren: Ira Clifford (Cleve), Faye (Munson). 

7. William Clinton (1903 - Unmarried 

Son of Charles E. and Grace M. Bateman. Born in Ogden, Utah. Disabled Navy 
veteran, San Francisco, Calif. 

8. William D. (1930 - m. Dorothy E. Hockenbrack (1931 - 

Son of William E. and Pearl Fegley. Born near Herndon, Pa. (Northumberland Co.) 
Factory worker, near Northumberland, Pa. Children: Dennis, Lou Ann, David. 

8. William Daniel (1925 - 1925). Son of (Victor) Dewey and Vercie J. Kirby, Decatur, 

111. 

9. William Daniel (1950 - . Son of Winfred P. and Katherine E. Dudtenhoefer, Decatur, 

111. 

6. William E. (1880 - I89O). Son of Henry M. and Sarah Seller, Northumberland Co., Pa. 

8. William E. (1893 - 1961) - m. Rose M. Lirot (cl895 - 

Son of Henry Harrison (Harry) and Caroline Parfait. Born in Mahanoy City, Pa. 
(Schuylkill Co.) Lived in VJaterburj"-, Conn. Children: Rosemary (D'Alfonso). Widow 
lives in Waterbury, Conn. 

7. William E. (l899 - m. Pearl Fegley (190I| - 196h) 

Son of David A. and Hettie A. Klinger. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumberland 
Co., Pa. Laborer, mechanic, and highway worker, Sunbury, Pa. Also lived in Hern- 
don, Pa. Children: Grace E. (Updegrove), Esther, Hazel I. (Bucher), William D., 
June Pearl (Harman), Merlin Dean. 

7. William Edward (l^an) (I878 - 1927) 

Son of David R. and Lydia A. Bonawitz. Probably born in Upper Paxton Twp., Dau- 
phin Co., Pa. and raised in Huron Co., Mich. Changed name to "Ryan" when, as a 
young man, he ran away from home. Captain of tug, Cleveland, Ohio. Veteran 
World War I - U. S. Navy - Lt. Children all named "Ryan". 

8. William Edward (I9h5 - . Son of Russell C. and Dorothy M. Lusk, Tiffin, Ohio. 

7. William Ellsworth (I88I - I9I42) - m. Anna Hahn (I88I - 19U9) 

Son of (Benjamin) Watson and Anna Hess. Machinist, Seneca Falls, N. Y. Children: 
Catherine (Smith), Francis William. 

9. William Elmer (I9l6 - 1916). Son of Roy E. and Pauline Wike, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

203 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. William F. (i860 - 1886) - m. Mary Sickmiller (1862 - 1935) 

Son of David M. and Mary J. Rennecker. Farmer in Flatrock Twp., Henry Co., Ohio. 
Children: Zoa (Magill), Harvey E. 

8. William Frank (l888 - 1957) - m. Bertha Mary Schaeffer (cl896 - 

Son of Addison and Rebecca Shaeffer. Farmer in Lebanon Co. and Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Children: Florence A. (Davis), Grace (Hoy), Anna D. (Miller), Merle (Leininger), 
Ralph William, William Paul. Widow lives near Grantville, Pa. 

9. William Frederick (1938 - m. Linda De Nard (19U3 - 

Son of Francis W. and Edna Van Kirk. Laboratory technician, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
Children: William Frederick Jr. 

10. VJilliam Frederick Jr. (I963 - . Son of '-Mlliam F. and Linda De Nard. 

7. William George (I883 - m. Nancy Wolever (I896 - 

Son of James and Louise Rummel. Farmer in Dakota Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
Children: Mary Louise (Arn). 

8. William George (I889 - 196U) - m. (l) Bertha Viola Rhoads (l892 - 19?3); (2) 

Mary R. Sommers (Evans) (cl895 - . Son of Jacob M. and Agnes A. Shaub. Chemist 
in steel mills, Steelton, Pa. Also lived in Newville, Harrisburg, and Highspire, 
Pa. (all in Dauphin Co.). Children: (l) William Lester, Richard McKay; (2) None. 
Widow lives in Highspire, Pa. 

8. William Gilbert (193U - m. Marilyn Rae Roark (l9hl - 

Son of Donald W. and Esther G. Gilbert. Born in Burlington, Wash. Field repre- 
sentative, Nielsen ratings, Spokane, Wash. Children: William Gilbert Jr. 

9. William Gilbert Jr. (196U - . Son of William G. and Marilyn R. Roark. 

6. William Godfrey (1862 - 195l) - m. (l) Mary J. Lesley (cl865 - 1950); (2) Anna _. 
Son of William and Sarah Ann Snyder. Born in Plain Twp., Stark Co., Ohio and 
raised in Columbia Twp., Whitley Co., Ind. Farmer in Whitley and Vfeibash Counties, 
Ind.; Oregon and Washington; and near Lebanon Junction, Ky; also lived in Lansing 
and Battle Creek, Mich. Children: (l) Vaiden C, Conde Ross, Adam Lesley; (2) 
None. 

6. William H. (l8hU - 1913) - m. Amanda Donkel (l850 - 19l5) 

Son of David and Dina Schneider. Laborer in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Children: 
Calvin Donkel, Elizabeth Margaret, Stella (Kline). 

7. William H. (I87U - 1879). Son of Jacob and Sarah Matter, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

9. William H. (cl9U5 - . Son of Norman L. and Arlene J. Erdman, near Perkasie, Pa. 

7. William Harold (192U - 1966) - m. Susan Labadie (192U - 

Son of Harold P. and Harriet L. McClain. Born in Canton, Ohio. In U. S. Air 
Force, including World War II - Lt. Col. Killed in Viet Nam. Children: William 
Harold Jr., Stephen Michael, Christopher, Timotly. Widow lives in Concord, Calif. 

8. William Harold Jr. (19U5 - . Son of William H. and Susan Labadie, Concord, Calif. 

20li 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. William Harris (1920 - m. (1) Marie C. Bower (cl920 - ; (2) Rose Marie Schrey 
(Cordy) (I9l5 - . Son of Earl G. and Susanna Zimmerman. Factory worker, near 
Millersburg, Pa. (Dauphin Go.) Children: (l) Deanna (Savige), Ronald William; 
(2) None. 

6. William Harvey (l866 - 19U0) - m. Nellie Bittner (cl870 - 1959) 

Son of Samuel and Leanna Stout. Born in Crawford Co., Ohio. Stationary steam 
engineer, Mansfield, Ohio. No children. 

7. William Harvey (I876 - 1877). Son of Alfred and Harriet G. Scrivener, Fulton Co., 

111. 

7. William Harvey (l877 - m. Lillie Ida Gottschall (I88O - I966) 

Son of John Adam and Elizabeth Hawk. Born in Jefferson Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa, 
Telephone company employee, Harrisburg, Lancaster, Reading, Kingston, and Wil- 
liamsport. Pa. Children: Herald Le Roy, Clayton De Witt, Sylva (Stone), 
Marlin Van Buren, Geraldine (Steffen). 

7. William Hayes (l875 - 1955) - m. Ada Lillian Paul (l875 - 19U7) 

Son of William H. and Anna E. Herr. Surveyor and civil engineer, Akron and 
Peninsula, Ohio. Spanish-American War veteran - 8th Ohio Inf. - Sgt. Children: 
Robert, Wilbur, Ada Ellen (Okey), Paul William, Sara (Daugherty). 

6. William Henry (I8U0 - 1929) - m. (1) Anna Elizabeth Herr (l8U5 - 1923); (2) Sina 
M. Prince ( ? - ? ). Son of John and Catharine Miller. Born in East Hanover Twp., 
Dauphin Co., Pa. Clerk, painter, hotel proprietor. Lived in many places in Dau- 
phin, Lebanon, and Cambria Counties, Pa.; Akron, Ohio; East Aurora, N. Y.; Ft. 
Wayne, Ind.; Chicago, 111.; St. Cloud, Fla . Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. A, 
127th Pa. Inf. and Sgt. Co. C, 208th Pa. Inf. Children; (l) Marcus Geary, Ellen 
(Ellis), Cora (Gudikunst), William Hayes, Roy, John Harvey; (2) None. 

6. William Henry (1853 - 1927) - m. (Sarah) Adaline Gregg (l851i - 1919) 

Son of George and Catherine Phillips. Born in Williamsville, N, Y. Blacksmith, 
Burr Oak, Mich. Children: Mabel Celia (Van Etta), (Elmer) Lloyd, Gela Bly(Miller). 

6. William Henry (l853 - l851t). Son of Jessias and Sarah Reed, Stark Co., Ohio. 

6. William Henry (i860 - 1936) - m. (l) Delia Bigelow (cl865 - ? ); (2) Nellie M. 
Sperry (I887 - I963). Son of Daniel and Elizabeth Wilson. Born in De Witt Twp., 
De Witt Co., 111. Farmer, livery-stable operator, restaurant operator, in 
Grand Island and Columbus, Nebr. Children: (l) Sherman E., Nelia (Krause); (2) 
Wilma Madeline (Seidel). 

6. William Henry (l877 - 1957) - m. Cora . 

Son of Hugh and iiHizabeth Gangluff. Born in Seneca Co., Ohio. Laborer, Toledo, 
Ohio. No children. 

6. William Henry (l877 - I878). Son of Frederick M. and Matilda McCurtain, Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. 

6. William Henry (1879 - 1952) - m. (l) Bessie L. Shanklin (l877 - 1936); (2) Ruth 
Peters (I9OO - . Son of John and Catherine Ann Dohmer. Born in Elkhart Co., Ind. 
Farmer near Cutler, Ind. (Carroll Co.). Children: (l) Mary Catherine (Carter), 
William Shanklin, Robert John; (2) None. Widow lives in Cutler, Ind. 

205 



PART B - REGISTER OF BQRDNER KALES AND TH EIR FAMILIES 

7. William Henry (1899 - 196h) - ra. Bernice Lovella Brown (1902 - 196U) 

Son of David Franklin (Frank) and Cora E. Smeltzer. Born in Viakarusa, Ind . (Elk- 
hart Co.) Ovined and operated an aluminiun foiuidry in St, Petersburg, Fla. Also ^ 
lived in Elkhart, Ind. and Niles, Mich. Children: Lyle Manley, Franklin, Helen 
Elaine (King - Preston), Hary Alice (Ward - Hasty), VJilliam Henry Jr., Earl 
Eugene, James Lloyd, Ivan Devon, Cora Lee (Gaskins), Edna Marie (Ryle - Hinchliff), 
Roy Lamarr, Cecil De Wayne, Barbara Jean (Richards), Carleton Alfred, VJarren Paul, 
David Charles, Dolores Lorraine. 

8. William Henry Jr. (1927 - m. Joyce Marie Parrish (1936 - 

Son of William H. and Bernice L. Brown. Born in St. Petersburg, Fla. Truck driver 
and salesman, bottled gas, Pinellas Park, Fla. Children: Linda Ann, Rose Marie, 
William Henry III. 

9. William Henry (1930 - m. Joan Louise Wimer (1930 - 

Son of Hoy E. and Pauline Wike. Truck driver and factory machine operator, 
Rouzerville, Pa. (Franklin Co.). Previously lived in Harrisburg and other places 
in Dauphin Co., Pa. Children: David Lee, William Henry Jr., Richard Alan. 

10. William Henry Jr. (19^0 - . Son of William H. and Joan L. Wimer, Rouzerville, Pa. i 

9. Vailiam Henry III (1957 - . Son of William H. Jr. and Joyce M. Parrish, Pinellas i 
Park, Fla. . 

6. William I. (1868 - ? ) 

Son of William and Mary (Polly) Derrick. Born in Lower Mahanoy Twp., Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. Known to have been living in 1905. No other information. , 

7. VJilliam Ivan (1939 - m. Betty Girton (cl939 - 

Son of VJilliam M. and Sylvia M. Long. Born in Riverside, Pa. (Northumberland Co.) 
Factory worker, Danville, Pa. (Montour Co.) Children: Samuel, Susan. i 

7. William J. (1863 - 1936) - m. (l) Name unknown; (2) Emma L. Lantz (1859 - 1917) 
Son of John VJ. and Isabella (Susan) Vfhitman. Born in Jackson Twp., Dauphin Co., 
Pa. Veterinarian in Millersburg, Pa. (Dauphin Co.) Children: (l) None; (2) 
Earl George. 

7. William J. (1879 - 1880). Son of V/illiam J. and Emma L. Dundore, Berks Co., Pa. 

7. William J. (1931 - m. Barbara Jane Scheller (1931 - 

Son of Frank and Mary Alice Blett. Born in Northumberland Co., Pa. Machinist, 
Shamokin Dam, Pa. (Snyder Co.) Also lived in Buffalo, N. Y. Children: Barbara 
Ann, William Andrew, Thomas Michael. 

9. William Jack (1955 - . Son of William P. and Barbara J. Wailes, Bennett, Colo. 

6. William Jacob (l8U9 - 1909) - m. Emma L. Dundore (cl855 - 1900) 

Son of Thomas L. and Melinda Schneider. Laborer, Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. 
Children: Agnes K. (Schaeffer), Thomas David, William J., Robert Peter, Harry S., 
Paul C, Anne M. (Reinert). 

206 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND THSIR FAMILIES 

8. VJilliani John (I89I - 19h9) - m. Nora Evelyn Wetzler (I89O - 

Son of Edward and Carrie M. Sallada. Born in Dauphin Co., Pa. Cable-splicer, 
Tower City, Pa. (Schuylkill Co.). Children: Thelma Virginia (Wagner), Jean Fay 
Lorraine (Bettinger). 

9. William Leslie (1958 - . Son of Earl E. and Betty B. Sharp, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

9. William Lester (I9l5 - m. Ednal-lae Ulrich (1910 - 

Son of William G. and Bertha V. Rhoads. Clerk, Harrisburg, Pa. Children: Edna 
Mae (Mrakovich), Joan Elaine (Pritchard), Carole Ann (Bretz), William Lester. 

10. William Lester Jr. (19U9 - . Son of William L. and Edna M. Ulrich, Harrisburg, Pa. 

7. William Lewis (l857 - 1913) - m. Retta H. Reisner (1861; - 1925) 

Son of Henry and Caroline Boyer. Born in Buckeye Twp., Stephenson Co., 111. 
Farmer, mason, and public-school janitor, near Jesup and in Indpendence, Iowa 
(Buchanan Co.). Children: Robert Immanuel, Elmer A., A. Lyle, Mildred Reisner, 
Verne St. Patrick. 

7. William Lorin (I896 - m. (1) Alyce Newman (I903 - ; (?) Ruth V. Hine (Chaddock) 

(1697 - . Son of James Monroe and Emma Bachtel. Born in Malvern, Ohio. Machin- 
ist, Louisville, Canton, and Malvern, Ohio. Children: Arlene May (McGeachie - 
Chodrick), Virginia Lee (Scott - Guisinger), William Ray, Wayne Lorin, Richard 
Glenn; (2) None. 

8. William Martin (19OI - 19h3) - m. Catherine Lillian Snyder (1907 - 19U6) 

Son of Emanuel S. and Eliza A. Kistner. Machinist in Northumberland and Sunbury, 
Pa. (Northumberland Co.) Children: Donald La Rue, Shirley M. (Savidge). 

9. William Michael (1953 - • Son of Richard G. and Mary L. Kiger, Lancaster, Ohio. 

6. William Morris (cl908 - m. (l) Sylvia May Long (cl9l6 - ; (2) Elda M. Carleton 

(cl920 - . Son of Isaac E. and Anna Anderson. Laborer and cook. Riverside and 
Penn's Creek, Pa. (Northumberland Co. and Snyder Co.) Children: (l) (Charles) 
Richard, William Ivan; (2) None. 

7. William Oscar (cl920 - 

Son of John H. ana Mary E. Heintzelman. Born in Northuitiberland Co., Pa. No 
information subsequent to 1937, when a guardian was appointed. 

9. William Patrick (1950 - . Son of Maurice and Loretta Brenneman, Canton, 111. 

9. William Paul (1931 - m. Fay I. Basehore (1933 - 

Son of William F. and Bertha M. Schaeffer. Building contractor and carpenter, 
near Hummelstown, Pa. (Dauphin Co.). Children: Bradley, Craig A., Kathy L. 

10. William Perry (I96U - . Son of Ronald E. and Sandra L. Jones, Lykens, Pa, 

8. William Potter (1930 - m. Barbara Jean Wailes (1929 - 

Son of (Clarence) Paul and Anna Potter. Telephone-company manager, Bennett, 
Colo. Children: William Jack, Jeffery Allen, Susan Marie. 

207 



PART B - REGISTER OF BORDNER MAI£S AND TliF.IR FAMILIES 

5. William R. (l8Uh - 1916) - m. Mary Catherine Keller (1851 - 188?) 

Son of John P. and Sarah Bordner. Farmer in Canton Tvip., Stark Co., Ohio. 
Children: Johnson Per Lee. 

8. William Ray (192$ - m. Esther Karbula (cl925 - 

Son of William L. and Alice Newman. Bom in Stark Co., Ohio. Factory worker, 
Mansfield and Gallon, Ohio. Veteran World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: 
Penny Lee, Barbara Ellis . 

9. William Robert (195U - . Son of Karl M. and Helen I. Downer, Ruskin, Fla. 
9. William Roy (1957 - . Son of Richard G. and Mary S. Gulp, Alexandria, Va. 

6. William S. (l852 - 1892) - m. Kate Brillhart (l8U9 - 1889) 

Son of John and Margaret Fishel. Born in Hopewell Twp., York Co., Pa. Lived in 
Shrewsbury, Pa. (York Co.). Children; Edward. 

7. William S. (1917 - m. Beatrice Marie Heim (1922 - 

Son of Dorsey A. and Maude A. Lubold. Born in Washington Twp., Northumberland 
Co., Pa. Army depot employee, Stroudsburg, Pa. (Monroe Co.). Children; Betty 
Ann, Bonnie Lou, Shirley Eilene. 

7. William Shanklin (191U - 19U2) - m. Mary Elizabeth Mann (1917 - 

Son of William H. and Bessie L. Shanklin. Farmer near Cutler, Ind. (Carroll Co.) 
Children; (Joseph) William, Carol Richard, Charles I4ann. Widow married Ray Cloe 
and lives in Greenwood, Ind. 

6. William Sylvester (l858 - 19la) - m. Polly Ann Hoch (l859 - 19Ul) ^ 

Son of Emanuel and Mary Ann Trego. Born in Chapman Twp. (part now in Union Twp.) 
Snyder Co., Pa. Branch manager of a lumber and grain concern in Stanton, Pilger, 
and Nickerson, Nebr. Also ovmed farmlands in Nebr., Colo., and Tex. Lived last ) 
years in Long Beach, Calif. Children: (Evan) Guy, Nellie Grace, Beulah Leona 
(Nicholson), William Boyd, Cecil I^yle, Rolland Delbert, Dalton Dwight. Also al- 
leged father of a son, Emanuel Sylvester (mother, Phoebe Sechrist) in Snyder Co., 
Pa. 

7. William Thomas (I896 - m. Verda E. Fisher (cl896 - 

Son of John H. and Einma M. Deck. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Bricklay- 
er, Mt. Aetna and Ifyerstown, Pa. (Berks Co, and Lebanon Co.) Children: Raymond 
Charles . 

6. William Walter (l872 - 19U8) - m. (l) Margaret (cl872 - cl910); (2) 

Margaret A. I^yons (I89O - I96I). Son of Jonathan and Mary (Sarah) Mace. Born 
near Baldwin, Kans.; raised in or near Butler, Ind. (De Kalb Co.). Railroad 
locomotive engineer, Butler, Ind. and Butte, Mont. Children; (1) Dorothy F. 
(Flynn); (2) John R., Henry (Harry) D., William Walter Jr. 

7. William Walter Jr. (1920 - m. Barbara Hafen (1917 - 

Son of William W, and Margaret A. Lyons. Born in Butte, Mont. Railroad -switch- 
man, Butte and Great Falls, Mont. Veteran World War II - U. S. Marine Corps - 
Sgt. Children: Steven W. 

208 



PART B - R EGISTER OF BORDNER MALES AND TH EIR FAMILIES 

7. William Washington (l879 - 19h9) - m. Minnie Viola Vaughn (I88I - 

Son of (Francis) Marion and Martha Levingston. Born in Lewistown Twp., Fulton 
Co., 111. Foreman, International Harvester Co., Canton, 111. Children: Irene 
(Crabtree), Inez (Wilson). Widow lives in Canton, 111. 

7. Willis Edgar (I88O - 19U2) - m. (1) Katherine Clark (cl890 - 1918); (2) Cather- 

Geraghty (1895 - . Son of George I. and Emma L. Johnson. Born in Upper Paxton 
Twp., Dauphin Co., Pa. and raised in Council Grove, Kans. Welder and boiler- 
maker, Topeka, Kans. Children: (1) Clark Edmund, Mary Emma Irene (Gardner- 
Benedict); (2) Francis Willis, Rita Marie (Gudenkauf), Catherine Arlene(Schmidt). 

8. Wilson (1902 - m. Aria Isabelle Nehrboss (1905 - 

Son of Sanford and Anna Beck. Born in Batavia, N. Y. Electrician, Crittenden, 
N. Y. Children: Robert Wilson, Raymond Gordon, George William, Janet Isabelle 
(Robinson), Carol Ann (Matus). 

6. Wilson Elroy (1923 - m. (1) Mary Joyce Miller (1923 - ; (2) Shirley Smith 
(1927 - ; (3) Kichaline Bernice Stroh (1939 - ; (U) Wanda J. Moats (192U - . 
Son of Wilson W, and Harriet McComb (Pentz). Born in Canton, Ohio. Now lives 
in Massillon, Ohio. Veteran World War II - U. S. Marine Corps. Children: (l) 
(2) (U) None; (3) Chrayel, Stephany. 

8. Wilson Ernest (1916 - 1951) - m. Connie Ward (cl920 - 

Son of Daine V. and Flora Gygax, Lived in Seattle, Wash. Children: Kenneth, 
William, Michael. Widow married Glen Walker and lives in Bend, Oregon. 

6. Wilson M. (cl866 - 1926) - m. (l) Delia Martin (cl866 - ? ); (2) Mildred Woodhams 
(cl870 - 1931). Son of Solomon and Elizabeth Willard. Born in De Kalb Co., Ind. 
Railroad station agent and telegrapher, Munson, Mich, and probably elsewhere. 
Subsequently owned and operated a saw-mill, and then a grocery store. Later 
lived in Jackson Co., Miss., probably in or near Moss Point. Children: (l) 
Daine Victor; (2) None. 

5. Wilson W. (1875 - 19U6) - m. (1) Gertrude Schneider (cl891 - ; (2) Harriet 

McComb (Pentz) (1885 - . Son of John P. and Sophia Weiteman. Born in Pike Twp., 
Stark Co., Ohio. Owned and operated a storage business in Canton, Ohio. Child- 
ren; (1) None; (2) Wilson Elroy. 

8. Winfred Paul (1923 - m. Katherine Elisabeth Dudtenhoefer (1927 - 

Son of (Victor) Dewey and Vercie J. Kirby. Product inspector. Caterpillar Tract- 
or Co., Decatur, 111. Veteran World War II - U. S. Army Engineers - Sgt. Child- 
ren: John Paul, William Daniel, Gary Lee, Vicki Jo. 



209 



PARI C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

NuBiber preceding name indicates generation, counting Balser Bortner as first genera- 
tion, his children as second generation, their children as third generation, etc. 

6. Abraham K. (l839 - 1912) - m. Sarah Catharine Zeller (l8Uii - 192U) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine M. Kemp. Originally named "Abram". Bom in Dayton 
Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio (part later in Mad River Twp.) Farmer in Lanier Twp., 
Preble Co. and German Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co.F, 
131st Ohio Inf. Children: Emma F.,Ida May (Mickey), Carrie A.(Pottenger), Edward, 
Myrta . 

7. Abraham Lincoln (I863 - 1932) - m. Amelia E. Baptist (I869 - 1958) 

Son of William 0. and Minerva B. Ennis. Probably born in Coles Co., lU.; also 
lived in Douglas Co. and near Broadlands, 111. (Champaign Co.). Children: 
Edna Mae (Thornton). 

5. Adam (I63I - 1911i) - m. (l) Malinda (I836 - I867); (2) Eliza Ann (Thomas 7) 

(1833 - 1896). Son of Peter and Susanna Ernst. Farmer in Franklin Twp., York 
Co. and Latimore Twp., Adams Co., Pa. Children: (l) Enina I. (Bonner); (2) 
Octavia E., Lemuel Austin, Annie M. (Bluebaugh). 

7. Alan (1927 - 1927). Son of Clare S. and Nelle G. Cochran, Butler Co., Pa. 

9. Alan Wayne (1958 - . Son of Kenneth W. and Yvette T. Follinger, Verdun, France. 

7. Albert (Cornelius Albertus) (1852 - 1900) - m. Clara Elizabeth Light (cl855 - 1912) 
Son of Ezra and Louise Keeran. Born in Keezletown, Va. (Rockingham Co.) Minister 
in United Brethren Church in various places in Pa., including York and Harrisburg. 
Presiding Elder, Pa. Conference for four years. Children: (Clara) Madeline 
(Hazlittj, Rene de Carte. 

6. (George) Albert (I86U - 1950) - m. Anna Rosette Alter (I86U - 1929) 

Son of George W. and Mary Ann Swartslander. Born in Fawn Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. 
Photographer, carpenter and farmer, Freeport, Pa., Huntington and Henderson, 
W. Va. Children: Marlyn Hale, (Victoria) Laverna (Scott), Paul Alter. 

7. Albert Charles (1905 - m. Helen Adzima (1906 - 

Son of Albert G. and Joanna Creighton. Originally named "Charles Albert". Born 
in Duquesne, Pa. (Allegheny Co.), Carpenter, Greenville and Hadley, Pa. (Mercer 
Co.). Children: Alberta Lucille (Webber). 

8. Albert Fouts (I89I1 - 189U). Son of William L. and Stmna Fouts, Preble Co., Ohio. 

6. Albert Grant (I868 - 1935) - m. Joanna (Anna) Creighton (cl87U - 1928) 

Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Einrick. Bom in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Carpen- 
ter and steel-mill worker, Duquesne and Ardara, Pa. Previously lived in Morgan 
Co., Mo. Children: Elmer, William C, (Richard) Telford, (Catherine) Pearl(Finley 
-Daugherty), Elton Raymond, Anna Mary, Charles Albert(Albert Charles), Robert 
Melvin, Flora Bell (Koerber), George Norman, (James) Raymond, Anna May (Mertz). 

5. Albert James (185U - 1921) - m. Emma Stevenson (1855 - 1907) 

Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Fair. Born in Butler Co., Pa. Farmer near Clarksburg, 
Mo. (Moniteau Co.) Children: Andrew Bryson, Clara Belle (Yessen),Mary Ellen(Scott). 

210 



\ 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNKR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIE S 

8. Albert Paul (191U - 1957) - m. (1) Clara Farmer (cl9l5 - ; (2) Viola Elizabeth 
Dobson (1928 - . Son of Homer P. and Anna Stover. Born in Mt. Solon, Va. (Rock- 
ingham Co.) Manager of McCrory Stores in Florida, Ohio, Georgia, and Texas (died 
in San Antonio, Tex.). Children: (l) Gayle Marion (Lord); (2) Albert Paul Jr., 
Floyd Bruce . 

8. Albert Paul Jr. (19U8 - . Son of Albert P. and Viola E. Dobson, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

8. Albert Weldon (I892 - 1900). Son of Newton Vfeldon and Ella M. Albert, Dayton, Va. 

7. Alexander (l8U9 - I868). Son of William 0. and Minerva B. Ennis, Douglas Co., 111. 

7. Alfred Frederick (1919 - m. Anita Nolene Mattox (1922- 

Son of Alfred T. and Foss Wilson. Born in Harrisburg, Pa. Senior clerk, oil re- 
fining company, Reading, Pa. (also Treas. of Credit Union). Veteran World War II - 
U. S. Air Corps - Sgt. Children: Frederick Carlisle, Tyrone Richard, Darcell Nolene, 
Colleen Lorena. 

6. Alfred Tennyson (l877 - 1936) - m. Foss Wilson (l875 - 19U3) 

Son of Jefferson and Ennia J. McCarrier. Born in Butler, Pa. Bookkeeper, Harrisburg, 
Reading, Pa. Children: Philip Wilson, Emma Jane, (Dora) Kathleen (Weinerth), Alfred 
Frederick, Richard Hugh. 

Allan (also see Alan) 

9. Allan C. (1938 - m. Anna May Frost (1937 - 

Son of Charles Walton Jr. and Florence A. McCullough. Employee of a rubber-stamp 
firm, San Jose, Calif. Children: Sheryl Ann, Jeffery Allan. 

h. Andrew (l8l5 - 1899) - m. Elizabeth Fair (I818 - I909) 

Son of John Bortner (Burtner) and Christina Bmerich. Changed his name to "Burtner**. 
Farmer in Buffalo, Clearfield, and Connaqueniping Twps., Butler Co., Pa.; in Ind.; 
and in Willow Twp., Moniteau Co., Mo. Died in Clarksburg, Mo. Children: Barbara 
Ellen (Stevenson), William John (John William), Amanda (Stevenson), Catharine (Artis), 
George Washington, Albert James, Clara Melissa (Smith-Burton-Webb), Andrew Curtin. 

$. Andrew (1827 - I88U) - m. Elizabeth Emerick (Eraerich) (I83U - 1903) 

Son of Jacob Bortner (Burtner) and Sarah (Ekas ?). Changed his name to "Burtner". 
Farmer in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa. and in Millcreek Twp., Morgan Co., Mo, 
Widow returned with most of femily to Allegheny Co., Pa. Children: William B., 
John E., Catharine Ann (Lancaster), Magdalena, Ellsworth, Charles Wesley, Albert 
Grant, James Andrew, Emma E^^izabeth, (Sarah) Emily (Dent-Simnons). 

9. Andrew Allen (19U8 - . Son of Donald P. and Dorothy Journsay, Pittsburgh, Pa, 

6. Andrew Bryson (I886 - m. (l) Mary Gertrude Martie (I89I - ; (2) Eveleyn Hall(Bea) 
(1897 - . Son of Albert J. and H^ama Stevenson. Born in Clarksburg, Mo. Engineer 
in a dairy plant, California and Columbia, Mo. Children: (l) Edward Bryson, Emma 
Gertrude (Bruce), Minnie Geraldine (Kees); (2) Shirley E. (Oberrailler) . 

2U 



PART C - REGISTSR OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. Andrew Curtin (i860 - 19U6) - m. Louisa Belle Petty (I86I - 1955) 1 

Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Fair. Born in Connaqueniping Twp., Butler Co., Pa. ' 
Farmer in Moniteau Co., Mo. and near Lakeside and Nestor, Calif. Died in San Diego, 
Calif. Children: Golda Elizabeth, Callie Rose (Macdonald). 

8. Andrew Wayne (I96U - . Son of Robert E, and Dortha L. Hill, Wilmington, Del. 

7. Arnold (I89U - cl9?0) - in. Sarah John (cl900 - 

Son of James A. and Katherine Fletcher. Probably born in or near Irwin, Pa. Laborer^ 
in Irwin, Pa., Youngstown and Cleveland, Ohio. Children: Alberta, Clara, Mary Jane'. 

10. Arnold Andrew (192U - m. Betty Ellen Dulin (192? - 

Son of Otto 0. and Zella M. Garrett. Born in Elizaville, Ind. (Boone Co.). Auto 
mechanic, Lebanon, VfLnamac, and Medaryville, Ind. Veteran World War II - U. S. 
Arny - Sgt. Children: Phyllis Merle (Stultz), Betty Rae, John Andrew. 

8. Arthur Kenney (188? - I888). Son of Charles J. and Estelle F. Randolph, Kansas City., 

7. Arthur Roy (1911 - m. (Margaret) Elizabeth Ambrose (1916 - 

Son of Forest H. and Mary L. Giles. Carpenter, near Butler, Pa. Children: Joanne 
Elizabeth (Bennett), Larry Arthur, Elaine Kay (Usell). , 

9. Barry Clair (19U1 - Unmarried 

Son of Clair M. and Margaret B. Smith. Farmer near Windsor, Pa. (York Co.). 

10. Basil Eugene (1930 - m. Myrna Louise Taylor (1938 - 

Son of Hobart E. and Sabina P. Reiber. Tool-and-die maker, Lebanon and Whitestown, 
Ind. Children: Dennis Leo, Charles Douglas. , 

7. Benjamin Franklin (I8U8 - 1930) - m. (l) Mary E. Robertson (cl830 - I878); (2) Lucy 

(Lucinda) Foraker (l850 - 19U6). Son of Jacob L. and Leah Evinger. Born near " 1 
Westfield, 111. (Coles Co.). Farmer, carpenter, and building contractor, Tuscola . ' 
and Chrisman, 111. and Ttockwall, Tex. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. B, l5Uth 111, ! 
Inf. Children: (l) Walter, Wilbur Earl; (2) Frank A., Nona E. (Forgason), Horace 
Albert, James Paul. •> ' 

10. Bernard Ivan (1937 - m. Mary Ann Whitt (1938 - 

Son of Hobart E. and Sabina P. Reiber. Film-developing supervisor for a photograph 
ic studio, Indianapolis, Ind. Also lived in Lebanon, Ind. Cliildren: Dale Wayne. 

Bert (see Albert) 

11. Bobby Ray (1952 - . Son of Raymond P. and Margaret S. Andrews, Springfield, Mo. 
10. Brad L. (1956 - . Son of Cecil R. and Myrlee R. Dodd, near Middletown, Md. 

10. (Louis) Bradley (1952 - . Son of Rene L. Jr. and Helen Richter, Charlotte, N. C. 

9. Brian William (I966 - . Son of William L. Jr. and Merrill Clady, Staten Island, N.Y. ' 

10. Bruce Barry (1962 - . Son of Willard H. and Nancy M. Rambo, near New Buffalo, Mich. 

8. Bruce Keith (I951i - . Son of Charles Keith and Mary E. Greer, Butler, Pa. 

212 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES A ND TH EIR FAMILIES 

7. Bruce L. (1905 - m. Bernetta V. Quigle (1906 - 

Son of Lemuel A. and Annie E. Deardorf. Born in Flora Dale, Pa. (Adams Co.). 
Pa. State Policeman, Hershey, Pa. Children: Roger L. 

10. Bruce Robert (1937 - m. Helen Louise Opitz (1938 - 

Son of Robert R. and Mary Sanford. Laboratory technician, Skokie and Niles, 111. 
Children: Matthev. 

8. Bryan Paulins (19^0 - . Son of Giles P. and Charlotte A. Heim, Webster, N. Y. 

8. Byard Bayliss (190U - 196l) - m. Margaret Gertrude Croan (1909 - 

Son of Homer P. and Anna V. Stover. Born in Mt. Solon, Va. (Rockingham Co.). Steel- 
mill worker, Gary, Indiana. Children: Willard Homer. Widow lives in ClearHater,Fla. 

9. Calvin Erman (1920 - m. Irma Louise Vandiver (1926 - 

Son of Charles F. and Mabel Oliver. Sales representative, Detroit and Royal Oak, 
Mich. Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Lt. Children: Brenda Louise, Douglas 
Alan. 

6. Calvin Reid (I896 - m. Olive Sarah Smith (190U - 

Son of William and Virginia Reid. Born in Monroe Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. In 
U. S. Arit^y beginning in World War I; service included World War II - Lt. Col. (Ret.) 
Children: Katharyn Louise (Brown), Calvin Reid Jr., Doris Caroline (Wojcik), Gene- 
vieve Ruth (Held), Robert Eugene, Now lives in New Cumberland, Pa. 

7. Calvin Reid Jr. (1927 - m. Ella Wagner (1931 - 

Son of Calvin R. and Olive S. Smith. Born in Mechanicsburg, Pa. In U. S. Army 
beginning in World War II - presently Master Sgt., krmy Finance School, Indianapolis, 
Ind. Children: Robert Calvin, Raymond Calvin, Dennis James, Sandra Lee. 

8. Carl (1913 - m. Marion Myers (1917 - 

Son of Martin H. Jr. and Mary C. Evans. Machinists' union representative, York, Pa. 
Veteran World War II - U. S. Air Corps. No children. 

8. Carl Alan (1956 - . Son of Giles P. and Charlotte A. Heim, Webster, N. Y. 

8. Carl Drew (19U2 - m. Lynne Diane Fenton (l9k$ - 

Son of Raymond D. and Maryann Seaman. Born in Pittsburgh, Pa. In U. S. Marine 
Corps in Viet Nam. - 1st Lt. No children. 

7. Carl Norris (1911 - m. Miriam Louise Latto (1913 - 

Son of Dorsey P. and Florence Norris. Merchant, steel storage -equipment and office 
furniture, Beaver Falls, Pa. Also lived in Butler, Pa. Veteran World War II and 
in U. S. Army until 196h - Ma J. (Ret.). No children. 

7. Carl Raymond (191U - m. Gladys J. Cunningham (cl91h - 

Son of Edward J. and Cora L. Dodds. Born in Ohio. Ship-stevedore superintendent. 
Southern Calif, ports. Lives in Los Alamitos, Calif. In U. S. Merchant Marine in 
World War II. Children: Marjorie Elaine (Guy), Carol Lee. 



213 



1 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Carroll Elmer (1926 - m. Patricia Lorraine Jackman (1932 - 

Son of Roy H. and (Florence) Mary Adams. Bom in Vfeshington, D. C. Fire-protec- 
tion engineer, The Boeing Co., Seattle, Wash. Lives in Bellevue, Wash. Veteran of 
World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: Caryl Lorraine, Sharon Patricia. 

9. Carroll Lloyd (1925 - m. Mary Ann Cashour (1932 - 

Son of Lloyd W. and Carrie Huffer. Farmer, near Frederick, Md. Children: James 
Eric, Michael Lee. 

8. (William) Cecil (1891 - 1918) - ra. Irene Johnson (cl890 - 

Son of George C. and Izora F. Clatterbuck. Grocery clerk, Harrisonburg, Va. (Rock^^ 
inghamCo.). Children: (William) Cecil. 

9. (William) Cecil (I9l6 - m. Hazel Elizabeth Turnbull (1920 - 

Son of (William) Cecil and Irene Johnson. Born in Harrisonburg, Va. (Rockingham 
Co.) Supervisor of model finishing, National Aeronautics and Space Administration,* 
Langley Field, Va. Lives in Hampton, Va. Children: (William) Cecil Jr. 

10. (William) Cecil Jr. (19U3 - m. Shirley Ann Hill (19U5 - 
Son of (William) Cecil and Hazel E. Turnbull. Designer, Newport News Shipbuilding ^,| 
Co., Newport News, Va. Lives in Hairpton, Va. No children. 

7. Cecil Forest (191U - m. Pearl Leona Bachman (1917 - 

Son of Forest H. and Mary L. Giles. Expediter in Steel Mill, Butler, Pa. Veteran' 
of World War II - U. S. Navy, Children: Carol Lee (Peters), Ronald Cecil, Marsha 
Jean. 

9. Cecil Roy (1930 - m. Ifyrlee R. Dodd (1929 - 

Son of Noah W. and Daisy Marker. Slaughter-house employee, near Middletown, Md. 
(Washington Co.) Children: Charles, Teresa, Brad L., Mary Kay. 

6. Charles (l869 - 1872). Son of John N. and Eliza Belle Logan, Allegheny Co., Pa. 

10. Charles (1950 - . Son of Cecil R. and %rlee R. Dodd, near Middletown, Md. 

8. Charles Albert (1900 - 1959) - m. Pauline Frances Harshbarger (cl900 - 

Son of William H. Jr. and Martha J. Huffman. Farmer, near Harrisonburg, Va. (Rock-*"- 
ingham Co.) Children: Lester Paul, (Lawrence) Daniel, Lowell David, Charles Albert.] 

9. Charles Albert Jr. (1935 - . Son of Charles A. and Pauline F. Harshbarger, Harrison-^ 

burg, Va. 



7. Charles Allen (1929 - m. Janet Ellen Flora (1936 - 

Son of William D. and Golda Dearmont. Born in White Post, Va. (Clarke Co.) Vice 
Pres. and Secy, of Chamber of Commerce, Lynchburg, Va. Also lived in Boyce, South 
Boston, Ashland, Waynesboro, and Pulaski, Va. and Charlotte, N. C. Children: 
Tarasey Leigh, Sydney Ann. 

10. Charles David (I9li3- m. Kuth Ann Haverfield (cl9U3- 

Son of Dale K. and Mildred N. Davidson. Born in Kansas City, Kans. Volunteer in 
Peace Corps, in Philippine Islands. Now in U. S. Air Force, Lackland A.F.B., Tex. 



I 



211i 



i 

i 



PART C - REGI S TER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

10. Charles David (1959 - . Son of Dr. L. Daniel and Louise H. Roller, Harris© nburg,Va. 

11. Charles Douglas (1958 - . Son of Basil E. and Myrna L. Taylor, Whitestowi, Ind. 

9. Charles Edgar (l92h - m. Mary Ann Long (1926 - 

Son of Charles W. and Olive 0. Campbell. Bom in Lebanon, Ind. In U. S. Air Force 
for 22 years, including World War II and Korean War - Lt. Col. (Ret.) Now lives in 
Houston, Tex. Children; Barbara Ann, Elizabeth, Patricia I^ynn. 

9. Charles Elias (19U2 - m. Carol Ann Estus (19U3- 

Son of Frederick S. and Beatrice M. Barrett. Born in Panama, N, Y. Operating eng- 
ineer, Lottsville, Pa.; Forestville, N. Y.; Biloxi, Miss.; Fallon, Nev. ; Rochester 
and Dunkirk, N. Y. No children. 

6. Charles F. (cl857 - cl885). Son of Peter and Helen (Dennis ?), Cincinnati, Ohio. 

8. Charles Forrest (I89I - m. Mabel Oliver (I89U - 

Son of Johnson A. and (Mary) Emma Deputy. Born in Dayton, Va. (Rockingham Co.). 
Carpenter in Detroit and Royal Oak, Mich. Veteran of World War I - U. S. Arny. 
Children: Forrest Oliver, Calvin Erman. 

10. Charles Frederick (1959 - . Son of Harold G. and Theresa Rahe, Muncie, Ind. 

8. Charles Henry (19U3 - m. Myra Bishop (CI9I43 - 

Son of Chester V. and Pearle Long. Born in Allegher^ Co., Pa. Paper-company em- 
ployee, San Jose, Calif. No children. 

7. Charles Herman (cl868 - 19U3) - m. Hattie A. Ware (l873 - 1939) 

Son of (William) Henry H. and Josephine Muder. Probably born in Butler Co., Pa. 
Farmer, oil-field, and factory worker. Sand Spring, Bardell, and Chelsea, Okla. 
Also lived in Toledo, Ore. Children: Leslie Orlando, Philip Henry, Frederick 
Stevenson. 

7. Charles J. (or I. ?) (l875 - 19UU) - m. J. Corinne Merkelbach (l877 - 19U8) 

Son of Joseph P. and Elizabeth Campbell. Born in or near West Alexandria, Ohio 
(Preble Co.). Bank employee. Tiffin, Ohio. No children. 

7. Charles Jacob (i860 - 1932) - m. Estelle F. Randolph (i860 - 1933) 

Son of Jacob L. and Melinda Hackett. Born in Douglas Co., 111. Carpenter in or 
near Tuscola, 111.; Jasper, Lamar, and Kansas City, Kans. Children: Snowden 
Orville, Arthur Kenney, Mable Clair (Kelly), Hazel Marcia (Johnson-Fritz), Mildred 
Vivian (Bassinet-West-Ham), Lillian Estella (McAlahaney). 

9. Charles Jefferson (1915 - m. Winnifred Alice Stewart (l9lU - 

Son of Leslie 0. and Nancy E. Baker. Born in Chelsea, Okla. Welder, Ft. Collins, 
Colo. Previously in U. S. Air Force for 23 years, including World War II and Kor- 
ean War - Lt. Col. (Ret.). Children: Charlene Elizabeth (Mo ran). 

9. Charles Patrick (1959 - . Son of Oliver L. and Mary C. Ceilings, Marwood, Pa. 

215 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Charles Washington (1897 - m. Olive 0. Campbell (1902 - i 

Son of George H. and Sarah C. Wilson. Born in Edgar Co., 111. Railway-mail clerk, 

Chicago, 111. and Lebanon, Ind. Veteran of World War I - U. S. Army - Sgt. Child- ^. 
ren: Charles Edgar. 

6. Charles Wesley (cl861; - 1950) - m. Anna Cadwallader (I876 - cl952) 

Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Emerick. Born in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa.; also 
lived in Morgan Co., Mo. when young. Glass-worker, Irwin and Duquesne, Pa. Farmer - 
in later life, near Byron Center, Ohio. Children: Charles Wesley Jr., Clarence 
Raymond, William John, Robert Sylvester, Emily Martha (Brooks). 

7. Charles Wesley Jr. (l895 - m. Mable Irene Fraley (I898 - 

Son of Charles W. and Anna Cadwallader. Born in Irwin, Pa. Steel-mill employee, 
Youngstown, Ohio. Now lives in Bradenton, Fla. Veteran of World War I - U. S. 
Arny. Children: Gertrude Jeannette (Neff), Winifred Elaine (Fitzpatrick). ^x 

8. Charles William (192U - m. Shirley Jean Clark (1927 - 

Son of Robert S. and Dorothy Mitchell. Born in Youngstown, Ohio. Employee of City, 
of San Diego, Calif. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army - Corp. Children: James 
Charles, Robert Lawrence, Charles William, Gail Ann, Beth Ann, Margaret Ellen. 

•'I 

9. Charles William Jr. (195U - . Son of Charles W. and Shirley J. Clark, San Diego, Cal. | 

7. Chester Vincent (1909 - m. Pearle Long (1911| - 

Son of Henry G. and Delia Irwin. Born in Tarentum Pa. (Allegheny Co.). Gardener 
for Moreland Schools District. Lives in San Jose, Calif. In U. S. Army for more 
than four years, including Vforld War II. Children: Alice Emily (Woodrow - adopted),, 
Janice Allene, Charles Henry. 

5. Christian (I826 - 1900) - m. Elizabeth Kapp (1835 - 1916) 

Son of George and Elizabeth . Born in Franklin Twp., York Co., Pa, Laborer, 

Franklin and Carroll Twps., York Co. and Monroe Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa, Children:* 
Catharine Ann (Grossman), (Sarah) Elizabeth (Baker), (Lydia) Emma (Moorehead-Hinkle):. 
Franklin C, (Frank), Cora A. (Keister), John Wesley. 

11. Christopher Brooks (1965 - . Son of James R. and Doris M. Middlebrooks, IndianapoliSuj 

10. Christopher Mark (1959 - * Son of Roger E. and Sylvia Creager - - In Nigeria. 

4 

8. Christopher Scott (1959 - . Son of William F. Jr. and Lauretta L. Gumpp, New Kensing- 

ton, Pa, ' I 

8. Clair Martin (1915 - m. Margaret Bernice Smith (19I6 - ' 

Son of James A. and Mary M. Frey. Born in York, Pa. Fanner and factory worker; ' 1 
lives in Lower Windsor Twp., York Co., Pa. Children: Barry Clair. 

7. Clair Paul (I886 - m. Harriett Fowler Leister (I89I - 1966) ' I 

Son of George A. and Mary E. Paules. Born in Churchtown (now Allen), Pa. (Cumber- } 
land Co.). Pres. Burtner Coal Co., Philadelphia, Pa. Children: Clair Paul Jr. I 



216 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Clair Paul Jr. (1920 - m. Margaret Letwas Burt (1919 - 

Son of Clair P. and Harriett F. Leister. Born in Philadelphia, Pa. In U. S. Air 
Force, including World War II - now Lt. Col., stationed in Japan. Children: Paul 
Daniel, Sally Anne, David Mark. 

6. Clare Singer (188? - m. Nelle Gertrude Cochran (1889 - 19Uli) 

Son of Isaac P. and Amanda J. Singer. Farmer and insurance agent, near Butler, Pa. 
Previously law clerk, court stenographer, secretary, civil engineer, mechanical 
engineer, and real estate broker in Butler Co. and Allegheny Co., Pa. Veteran of 
World War I - U. S. Arn^^ - Corp. Children: Lois Jane (Gerlach), Leah Gertrude 
(Snyder-Sharer), Vera Elizabeth (Ferree), Robert Clare, Donald William, Paul Atlee, 
Nelle Jean (Reardon), Alan, Lynn Cochran, David Singer. 

8. (Ora) Clarence (1889 - m. Lillie Bell Whitesell (cl890 - 

Son of Marion A. and Hannah J. Stackhouse. Born near Broadlands, 111. (Champaign 
Co.)> Lives in Kokomo, Ind., in which vicinity he has lived all adult life. Child- 
ren; George Edward, Lester Everett, Clarence Leroy, Ethel Evelyn (Heffelmire), 
Clara May (Burnett), Flora Hannah (Jones), Mary Elizabeth (Haymes), Beatrice Irene 
(Shaffer), Mildred Belle (Smith-Nichols). 

8. Clarence Clinton (l897 - m. Lucy Delilah Miller (Emery) (I896 - 

Son of Thomas J. and Amanda Kingery. Born near Bourbon, 111. (Douglas Co.); also 
lived near Miles City, Mont, when young. Farmer and laborer, in and near Oakland, 
111. (Coles Co.). Children: (Charles) Thomas, Naida Louise (Gregory), Mary Frances 
(Daugherty). Step-son, Clifford Eugene Emery, changed name to "Burtner", 

9. Clarence Leroy (1920 - m. Ada Mildred Owens (1920 - 

Son of (Ora) Clarence and Lillie B. Whitesell. Born in or near Lebanon, Ind. Lives 
in Marion, Ind. Children: Orland (adopted), Mary Belle, Clarence Leroy Jr. 

10. Clarence Leroy Jr. {I9h9 - . Son of Clarence L. and Ada M. Owens, Marion, Ind. 

7. Clarence Raymond (1897 - 196$) - m. Gertrude Wilderson (cl900 - 

Son of Charles W. and Anna Cadwallader. Born in Irwin, Pa. Steel-mill worker in 
Youngsto^m, Ohio. Veteran of World War I - U. S. Marine Corps. Children: Richard 
Lamont. Widow lives in Youngstown, Ohio. 

9. Clifford Eugene (1917 - m. Anna Marie Rothermel (1920 - 

Step-son of Clarence C. and son of Lucy D. Miller (Emery). Born in Oakland, 111. 
Mechanic, Chicago, 111. Children: Dorothy Ann (Esposito), Richard Eugene, William 
Joseph, Mary Ellen (Mungiovie), Michael Edward, Steve Robert, Patrick Thomas. 

6. Clinton Percy (cl86Li - cl9l6) - m. I sola (Zoe) Embry (cl865 - 1929) 

Son of Reuben and Mary J. Neidig, Born in Muscatine, Iowa. In coal business in 
East Chicago, 111. Photographer's assistant in Pittsburgh, Pa. Children: (Gibson 
Embry) Lambert, (Clinton) Lyle. 

9. Dale Charles (1926 - m. Leona May Wright (1928 - 

Son of William R. and Eleanor Cooper. Born in Portland, Ore. Dean, School of Arts 
and Science, Fresno State College (Calif.). Also chemist and teacher. Previously 
lived in Seattle, Wash, and Richmond, Calif. Children: Don Reed, Ann. 

217 



PARI C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Dale Kenneth (1920 - ra. (1) Mildred Nadine Davidson (1917 - ; (2) Ila R. Smith 

(1918 - . So;i of Snowden 0. and Sarah J. Lee. Bom in Kansas City, Kans. Specia] 
representative, life insurance company, Bijou, Calif. (Lake Tahoe). Also lived in | j, 
Stockton, Calif. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Corp. Children: (l) 
Dale Kenneth Jr., Charles David j (2) None. «• n 

10. Dale Kenneth Jr. (l9Ul - m. Carolyn Ruth Penner (cl9Ul - ^5. 
Son of Dale K. and Mildred N. Davidson. Bom in Kansas City, Kans. Teacher of 
Mathematics and Ph. D. student. University of Kansas, Ottawa Kans. No children. 

11. Dale Wayne (1965 - • Son of Bernard I. and Mary A. Whitt, Indianapolis, Ind. 

U. Daniel (cl8lU - cl875 ?) - ra. Elizabeth Stepp (?) (I8I6 - I836) 

Son of John Bortner (Burtner) and Christina Emerich. Changed name to •*Burtner'*. J 
Farm laborer in Buffalo Township and Jefferson Township, Butler Co., Pa. Children! 
Mary (?) - she may have changed her name to "Stepp". 



5. Daniel (1828 - I889) - m. Susan Rhinehart (cl831 - 1899) 

Son of Samuel and Elizabeth Fought. Bom in Silver ^ring Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa 
Laborer and farmer in Silver Spring Twp., Cumberland Co., near Bridgeport, Pa., an<f, 
in Muscatine, Iowa. Also merchant in East Pennsborough Twp,, Cumberland Co., Pa., 
and agricultural implement dealer and boarding-house keeper in Muscatine, Iowa, wheVt 
he lived in later life. Children: Clara V. (Schenck), Elizabeth L., George Shomar,, 
Samuel E., John (Otis) Dickson (Dick), (Desdemona) Artamesia (Mistie - Byrne). 



10 

t 






9. (Lawrence) Daniel (192? - m. Louise Hester Roller (1932 - 

Son of Charles A. and Pauline F. Harshbarger. Physician and pediatrician in Harri 
onburg, Va. (Rockingham Co.). Veteran of World War II - U. S. Arny Med. Corps -Sgtt 
Children: (Lawrence) Daniel, Barbara Ann, Charles David, Brenda Gail. 

10. (Lawrence) Daniel Jr. (1957- . Son of Dr. L. Daniel and Louise H. Roller. 

9. Daniel Clark (1962 - . Son of Richard L. and Joanne L. Fennell, Youngstown, Ohio. 

6. Rev. Daniel Emory (l862 - 1958) - m. Alice Mary Evers (I86U - 193U) 

Son of Samuel and Catharine May. Born in East Pennsborough Twp., Cumberland Co., 
Pa. Minister in the Congregational Church, Clay Centre, Kans.; West Boylston and 
Swan?)scott, Mass.; Williamsport, Pa.; Medford and Lynn, Mass. Children: Evers. 

10. Daniel Geroge (1953 - . Son of George S. and Patricia A. Butts, Clear Spring Md. 

8. Daniel Lewis (19U2 - m. Joan Carol Schultz (19U3 - _ 

Son of Donald W. and Betty J. Lewis. Born in New Albany, Ind. Maintenance trouble- p 
shooter, Luxaire Cushion Co., Newton Falls, Ohio. Also lived in Valencia, Pa. 
(Allegheny Co.). Children: Daniel Lewis Jr. 1 

9. Daniel Lewis Jr. (1965 - . Son of Daniel L. and Joan C. Schultz, Newton Falls, Ohio.- ; 
8. Darrell Eugene (1950 - . Son of Vance W. and Esther E. Hogg, near Butler, Pa. 

10. Darrell Wayne (1959 - . Son of Lloyd 0. and Mildred L. Warren, Lebanon, Ind. 

218 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Darwin Mark (1958 - , Son of Vance W. and Esther E. Hogg, near Butler, Pa. 

9. David Alan (19$8 - . Son of William L. and Phyllis J. Schell, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

10. David Allen (19SU - • Son of Lloyd 0. and Mildred L. Warren, Lebanon, Ind. 

5. David Alter (l8U2 - 1907) - m. Catherine Angeline Beale (l858 - 19liO) 

Son of George and Maria (Polly) Rowley. Born in East Deer Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. 
Laborer in and near Natrona, Pa. (Allegheny Co.). Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. A, 
5th Pa. Heavy Art. Children: Margaret Elizabeth (Forrester), Maria Antoinette 
(Whitley), John Wesley, Ida Irene (Ford), David Newton. 

9. David Daniel (1938 - m. Vanessa June Johnson (1937 - 

Son of Frank and Catherine M. Haley. Born in Detroit, Mich. Physician, Ann Arbor, 
Mich, and New Haven, Conn. Children: Jason David. 

10. David Edward (196U - . Son of David E. Jr. and Betty J. Smith, Greensboro, N. C. 

8. David Emerson (19U8 - . Son of Emerson E. and Ethel L. Yingling, St, Petersburg,Fla. 

11. David Eugene (1959 - o Son of Delmar R. and Betty M. Strawmyer, Noblesville, Ind. 

8. David Ezra (190U - m. Melrose Vance (cl905 - 

Son of David H. and (Ella) Florence Knott. Owns and operates a retail furniture 
store, The Burtner Furniture Co., Greensboro, N. C. Children: David Ezra Jr., 
William Henry. 

9. David Ezra Jr. (1929 - m. Betty June Smith (1930 - 

Son of David E. and Melrose Vance. Merchant and farmer, Greensboro, N. C. Child- 
ren: Jennifer Sue, David Edward. 

7. David Henry (1862 - 193U) - m. (1) Emma Spalter (cl865 - 1893); (2) (Ella) Florence 

Knott (cl865 - ? ). Son of Ezra and Sarah E. Harp. Born in Keezletown, Va. (Rock- 
ingham Co.); also lived near Hagerstown, Md. and Charlotte, N, C. Owned and oper- 
ated a retail furniture store in Greensboro, N. C, Children; (1) Rene Leroy; (2) 
Henry K., James, David Ezra. 

8. David Howard (1952 - . Son of David S. and Barbara E. Elliott, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

9. David Jacob %and (1932 - m. Joyce Lee Adams (I9h2 - 

Son of Lloyd W, and Carrie Huffer. Farmer near Frederick Md. Children: Kathy May, 
Karen Lee. 

10. David Kirk (19U9 - . Son of Rev. Robert W. and Cleo B„ Wakefield, Portland, Ore. 
9. David Mark (1953 - • Son of Clair P. Jr. and Margaret L. Burt, in Japan. 

8. David Melvin (1953 - . Son of David N. Jr. and Valjean Elliott, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 



219 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. David Newton (I886 - 1959) - m. Nellie Shook (cl889 - 1961) 

Son of David A. and Catherine A. Beale. Coal miner, Natrona Heights, Pa. (Alle- 
gheny Co.). Children: Roy I^jmn, (Nellie) Irene (Ormescher), David Newton Jr. 

7. David Newton Jr. (1926 - m. Valjean Elliott (1930 - 

Son of David N. and Nellie Shook. Born in Natrona Heights, Pa. Salvage repairman,| 
Ford Motor Co., Standing Div., Walton Heights, Ohio. Lives in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohic 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Navy Air Corps. Children: Deborah Jean, David 
Melvin. 

9. David Paul (1957 - . Son of John P. and Mary Fasulo, Staten Island, N. Y. ■♦] 

9. David Scott (1959 - . Son of James E. and Virginia A. Cole, Hampstead, N. H. 

*. 

7. David Singer (1932 - m. (l) Barbara Elaine Elliott (1932 - ; (2) Dixie Caroline 

Stroup (1936 - . Son of Clare S. and Nelle G. Cochran. Born in Butler, Pa. 
Service supervisor, Dow Industrial Service, Depew, N« Y. Lives in Buffalo, N, Y. •■ 
Previously lived in Butler, Pa.j Lawrence, Kans.; Muskogee, Okla.; Canfield, Ohio, 
Children: (l) Betty Loraine, David Howard; (2) Jeffrey Lance, Joel Leslie. 

6. David Smith (l853 - I878) - m. India J. Vanduver (cl853 - ? ) 

Son of Rev. John and Margaret A. Berry. Born near Perryville, Ind. Lived briefly^ 
in Edgar Co., 111. and Johnson Co., 111. Children: A daughter, name unknown. 

8. David Thomas (I9i;5 - . Son of Donald W. and Betty J. Lewis, Newton Falls, Ohio. 
8. David Vance (19U9 - . Son of Vance W. and Esther E. Hogg, near Butler, Pa. 
8. Dean Ray (1955 - . Son of Harry C. and Jennie L. Taylor, near Butler, Pa. 

10. Delraar Raygene (1935 - ni. Betty Maxine Strawmyer (193U - 
Son of Hobart E. and Sabina P. Reiber. Born in or near Lebanon, Ind. En^loyed by 
Sound and Equipment Co., Noblesville, Ind. Children: Anna Kathleen, Orval Raygene^,! 
Peggy Maxine, David Eugene. 

8. Dennis James (1956 - . Son of Calvin R. Jr. and Ella Wagner, Indianapolis, Ind. 4, 

11. Dennis Leo (1955 - . Son of Basil E. and Myrna L. Taylor, Whitestown, Ind. 

8. Don Charles (19U8 - . Son of Charles K. and Mary E. Greer, Butler, Pa. 

10. Don Reed (1953 - . Son of Dale C. and Leona M. Wright, Fresno, Calif. 

8. Donald Paul (1926 - m. (l) Dorothy Journsay (1925 - ; (2) June Lowery (cl925-196l); 
(3) Bernice Neeley (1926 - . Son of Raymond I. and Elva E. Henphill. Born in 
Natrona, Pa. Blectric-utility maintenance-man, Grafton and Pittsburgh, Pa. Veteran 
of World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: (1) Andrew Allen, Linda Elaine, Gary Paul;' 
(2) and (3) None. 



220 



PART C - REGISTBR OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Donald Ralph (192? - ra. Blanche Elizabeth Silva (1932 - 

Son of Edwin R. and Ethel Provis, Service-station operator, Grass Valley, Calif. 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army - Sgt. Children: Debra Lynn. 

7. Donald William (1918 - m. Betty Jean Lewis (1921 - 

Son of Clare S. and Nelle G. Cochran. Born in West Pittsburgh, Pa. Chemical en- 
gineer and industrial executive, Newton Falls, Ohio. Also lived in Butler, Pa.; 
Jeffersonville, Ind.; Warren and Borne, Ohio; Valencia and Stoneboro, Pa. Veteran 
of World War II - U. S. Navy. Children; Donna Jean (Rog), Daniel Lewis, David 
Thomas. 

6. Dorsey Paulins (I878 - 1914?) - m. (l) Florence Norris (I88O - 1917); (2) Pearl 

%ant (1880 - . Son of Isaac P. and Amanda J. Singer. Born in Fawn Twp., Alle- 
gheny Co., Pa. Owned and operated an auto service-station in Beaver, Pa. Child- 
ren: (1) Mary E. (Schneider), Raymond Dorsey, Carl Norris, Virginia A. (Carver); 
(2) None. 

10. Douglas Alan (195U - . Son of Calvin E. and Irma L. Vandiver, Royal Oak, Mich. 

9. Douglas Milton (19U3 - . Son of Charles Walton Jr. and Florence A. McCullough. 

In U. S. Navy; presently in Placentia, Newfoundland, Canada. 

10. Duane Alan (1956 - . Son of Sherwin M. and Mary L. Huff, near Staunton, Va. 

8. Duane Wesley (1952 - . Son of Vance W. and Esther E. Hogg, near Butler, Pa. 

8. Dwight Curtis (1955 - . Son of Harry C. and Jennie L. Taylor, near Butler, Pa, 

8. Earl (I89U - I896). Son of Marion A. and Hannah J. Stackhouse, Broadlands, 111. 

7. Earl (cl900 - cl907). Son of James A. and Katherine Fletcher, in Western Pa. 

7. Earl Cleveland (l895 - I896). Son of Franklin (Frank) C. and Elraerta M. Nelson, 
York Co., Pa. 

9. Edallen York (l95l - . Son of Edward C. and Wilma Craun, Mt. Solon, Va. 

7. (Jonathan) Edmund (Ed) (l87h - 1903) - Unmarried. 

Son of John E. and Susan B. Criswell. Born in Butler Co., Pa. Died in Beaumont, 
Tex. No other information. 

6. Edward (cl865 - cl865). Son of Philip and Rebecca Shobert, Butler Co., Pa. 

7. Edward (cl873 - CI89O). Son of Abraham K. and Sarah C, Zeller, Montgomery Co., Ohio. 

7. Edward Bryson (1911 - m. (l) Lenora 0. Hall (1910 - ; (2) Kathryn Bohlander (1906- 
Son of Andrew B. and Mary G. Martie. Born in California, Mo. Truck driver, Tacoma, 
Wash. Children: (l) Kenneth Edward, Patricia Laura (Klos), Carolyn Gertrude (York), 
Sharon 0. (Herbert), Pamela Sue (Wboten); (2) None. 



221 



PAR T C - REGISTER O F BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Edviard Carl (1912 - m. Wilma Craun (1915 - 

Son of Homer P. and Anna V. Stover. Farmer, near Mt. Solon, Va. (Rockingham Co.),"^ 
Children: Judy Bert, Patsy Dawn, Larry Scott, Sdallen York. 

6. Edward John (l38l - 1966) - m. Cora Lillian Dodds (l880 - 1926) "*' 

Son of John N. and Eliza Belle Logan. Born in Jefferson Twp., Butler Co., Pa. One- ' 
time oil-gauger at various places in Pa. and Ohio. Later, farmer in Jefferson Twp. J 
Butler Co., Pa. Children: Frank Dodds, John Finley, Carl Raymond, Snerson Edward. 

6. Rev. Edward Otterbein (1866 - 195U) - m. Helen Rauch (I870 - 1953) 

Son of Samuel and Catharine May. Born in East Pennsborough Twp., Cumberland Co., ' 
Pa. Minister in United Brethren Church, Philadelphia, Hummelstown, Mount Joy, ' 
Lykens, Palirryra, Allentown, Steelton, and Harrisburg, Pa. Children; Robert Rauch, j 
(John) Howard, (Katherine) Elizabeth, Warren Edward. i 

8. Edward Paul (l9hU - . Son of Paul A. and Marjorie M. Bedwell, Huntington Beach, Cal 

7. Edward William (I889 - 1961^) - Unmarried. 

Son of Milton D. and Margaret M. Rice. Born in East Pennsborough Twp., Cumberland 
Co., Pa. Veteran World War I - U. S. Arny. Farmer, laborer, and gardener in and 
around Harrisburg, Pa. and at Pennsylvania Soldiers' and Sailors' Home, Erie, Pa. 

7. Dr. (ELmer) Edwin (188I - 1923) - m. Maude Truxal (cl885 - 

Son of Rev. William H. and Perthena F. Paul. Born in Rockingham Co., Va. Minister 
in United Brethren Church, Missoula, Mont.; Spokane, Wash.; and Westerville, Ohio. 
Children: (Elmer) Edwin Jr., Margaret (Hibbard). Widow lives in Lebanon, Ohio. 

8. Dr. (Elmer) Edwin Jr. (1912 - m. Bonita Engle (1911 - 

Son of Dr. E. Edwin and Maude Truxal. Born in Missoula, Mont. Minister in United 1 
Brethren Church. Professor at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio. Children-' ' 
Robert Edwin (adopted). ,l 

9. Edwin Earl (1922 - 19l;2). Son of Walter S. and Alice Robison. In or near Lebanon,Im 

7. Edwin Russell (1389 - 1962) - m. Ethel Provis (I893 - 

Son of Rev. George Washington and Mary E. Steffey. Dry-cleaner and presser. Grass* 
Valley, Calif. Veteran of World War I - U. S. Amy Med. Corps - Sgt. Children: 
Edwin Russell Jr., Frances Ethel (Wright), Donald Ralph. 

8. Edwin Russell Jr. (1920 - m. Madeline Jean Chapman (1922 - 

Son of Edwin R. and Ethel Provis. Born in Grass Valley, Calif. In U. S. Air Force 
for 25 years, including World War II - - presently Chief Master Sgt., Lockbourne ' 
A. F. B., Ohio. Children: Edwin Russell III, Kathleen Marie, Carol Jane, Roger 
Frank, Ann Lynette. 

9. Edwin Russell (1928 - m. Nancy Ladd (1935 - 

Son of Howard W. and Ix^uise Miller. Bom near Keedysville, Md. Division Manager, 
Controller Operation, Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., Washington, D. C. Lives* 
in Chevy Chase, Md. Also lived in New York City. Children: Edwin Russell Jr.. 
Judith Eleanor. ' 



222 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALE S A ND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Edwin Russell III (19U6 - . Son of Edwin R. Jr. and Madeline J. Chapman, Lockbourne 

Air Force Base, Ohio . 

10. Edwin Russell Jr. (I96I - . Son of Edwin R. and Nancy Ladd, Chevy Chase, Md. 

6. Ellsworth (1863 - 1863). Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Emerick, Butler Co., Pa. 

7. Elmer (I889 - cl95l) - m. Anna Lindahl (cl890 - ? ) 

Son of Albert G. and Joanna Creighton. Steel-mill worker, Duquesne, Braddock, 
Mifflin, and Ardara, Pa. No children. 

7. Elmer Clinton (l873 - cl880). Son of Rev. George Washington and Mary E. Steffey. 
Died probably in Woodbridge, Calif. 

7. Elton Raymond (1900 - 1900). Son of Albert G. and Joanna Creighton, Duquesne, Pa. 

7. Emerson Edward (I9l6 - m. Ethel Louella Yingling (I918 - 

Son of Edward J. and Cora L. Dodds. Bom near Marietta, Ohio. Barber, near Butler, 
Pa. and St. Petersburg, Fla. Children: Robert Jay, David Emerson, Linda Jean. 

10. Eric A. (1961 - . Son of Sheldon K. Jr. and Joann Smith, Canal Winchester, Ohio. 

6. Eugene Millett (I878 - 1885). Son of Reuben and Mary J. Neidig, Pomona, Kans. 

9. Eugene Philip (192I4 - m. Billye Ruth Reese (1926 - 

Son of Philip H. and Nora M. McCullough. Born in Chelsea, Okla. Employee of Amer- 
ican Airlines, Ft. Worth, Tex. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Ariry - Sgt. Child- 
ren: Richard Eugene, Cynthia Jean. 

9. Evan Hugh (1913 - 1963) - m. Olga Alings (I9l6 - 

Son of Gorman R. and Olwen Hughes. Born in Tygh Valley, Oregon. Exploration geol- 
ogist, Los Gatos, Calif.; Boulder, Colo.; and Amarillo, Tex. Children: Olwen Ellen 
(Chaniberlin), Sonja Gwendolyn. Widow lives in Boulder, Colo. 

10. Everett Lester (19U6 - . Son of Lester E. and Faye Burnett, Marion, Ind. 
In U. S. Navy. 

7. Evers (1893 - m. Mary Ellen Dubois (1897 - 

Son of Rev. Daniel E. and Alice M. Evers. Born in West Boylston, Mass. Engineer, 
Yacht-measurer, and Associate Prof, of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering at 
Mass, Inst, of Tech., Wakefield, Mass. Children: Cynthia Janet (Thayer), James 
Emory . 

6. Ezra (1828 - 1898) - m. (l) Louise Keeran (I83I - i860); (2) Sarah Elizabeth Harp 
(l8hl - 1932). Son of Rev. Henry and Margaret Statler. Born near Leitersburg, Md. 
Farmer, near Keezletown, Va. (Rockingham Co.) and near Hagerstown, Md. In Confed. 
Ani^y in Civil War for brief period in I86I - Priv. Co. F, 58th Va. Militia. Child- 
ren: (1) Cornelius Albertus (Albert), Mary Margaret, Markwood Monroe, Louisa Belle; 
(2) David Henry, Osceola Winfield, (Sarah) Ella, Fanny May (Wyand), (Elizabeth) 
Blanche (Summers), William T. Hamilton, Gurnea Cora (Wilkinson), Jacob Harp, Emma 
Bell, Roy Ezra, 

223 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNSR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Ezra Emerson (I89O - m. Pearl Gray (I896 - 

Son of Rev. Markwood Monroe and Margaret B. Reed. Bom in St. Thomas, Pa. (Frank- 
lin Co.). Horticulturist and farmer, near Dufur, Ore. Children: Lynn Lockley. 

6. Floyd (IS9I - I960) - m. Nora Ewer (clB95 - ? ) 

Son of (Martin) Luther and Ellen Harvey. Born in Harrison Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa, 
Steel-mill worker, Brackenridge, Pa. Children: Grace E. 

8. Floyd Bruce (19^0 - . Son of Albert P. and Viola E. Dobson, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

8. Forest Edward (1893 - I89U). Son of Thomas J. and Amanda Kingery, Douglas Co., 111." ,, 

6. Forest Harmon (l882 - m. Mary Lena Giles (I888 - J 

Son of Isaac P. and Amanda J. Singer. Born in Harrison Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa, 
Farmer, near Butler, Pa. (Butler Co.). Children: Elsie Amanda, Arthur Roy, Giles 
Paulins, Cecil Forest, Lena Joyce (Trurabauer), (Charles) Keith, Jessie Alice 
(Skinner), Roger Quentin, Neal Richard, Vernon Laurel, Charlotte Jenifer, Mary 
Frances (Boggs), Vance Wesley, Wendell Harmon, Russel Stanley, Harry Curtis, 
Marylin Ethel (Glasgow). 

10. Forrest James (19U9 - . Son of Forrest 0. and Annette B. Garras, Rockford, 111. 

9. Forrest Oliver (I92I4 - m. Annette Bertha Garras (1926 - 

Son of Charles F. and Mabel Oliver. Born in Detroit, Mich. Program-coordinatin 
manager, Chrysler Motors, Detroit, Wayne, and Livonia, Mich, and ifcckford. 111. 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Corp. Children: Forrest James, Gary 
Alan, Carol Anne. 

Francis (also see Frank) 

8. Francis Ronald (19?U - m. Doris Ruffner (cl925 - 

Son of Wilbur L. and Cecilia Hiwiller. Born in Marwood, Pa. Laborer, Butler, Pa. 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Arny. No children. 

7. Francis True (l89h - cl895). Son of Henry G. and Delia Irwin, Tarentum, Pa. 
Frank (also see Franklin, Francis) 

8. Frank (1901 - 1965) - m. Catherine Margaret Haley (1901 - 

Son of Johnson A. and Emma Deputy. Born in Dayton Va. (Rockingham Co.). Mechani- 
cal engineer, Santa Barbara, Santa Monica, Calif.; Detroit, Mich. Children: June 
Bstelle, David Daniel. Widow lives in Detroit, Mich. < 

8. Frank A. (I883 - 1952) - m. Adda Lee Martin (1892 - 

Son of Benjamin F. and Lucy Foraker. Bom in Chrisman, 111. (Edgar Co.). Cotton 4 
broker and cotton-gin manager, Rockwall, Wharton, and San Antonio, Tex. Children: I 
Frank Alan. Widow lives in Clemson, S. C. 

9. Frank Alan (191U - Unmarried 

Son of Frank A. and Adda L. Martin. Born in Wharton, Tex. Professor of Sociology, 
Clemson University, Clemson, S. C. i 

22U 



11 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 



6. Frank (Franklin) C. (186? - 190^) - m. Elmerta M. Nelson (I87U - 1905) 

Son of Christian and Elizabeth Kapp. Farmer in Franklin and Washington Twps., 
York Co., Pa. Children: William Raymond (Raymond William), Earl Cleveland, Lottie 
Jane (Wonder), Robert Grenville, Gail Elizabeth (Weigel). 

8. Frank Charles (1901 - m. (1) Reba Hester Epperly (cl900 - 1961); (2) Dorothea 
Baker (James) (cl900 - . Son of William L. and Emma Fouts. Born in Preble Co., 

Ohio. Salesman, Beckley, West.Va. and West Alexandria, Ohio (Preble Co.)- No 
children. 

7. Frank Dodds (1909 - 1962) - m. Mary Dolores Howley (1909 - 

Son of Edward J. and Cora L. Dodds. Born in Jefferson Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Serge- 
ant, Pennsylvania State Police, Sciota, Hazleton, and Stroudsburg, Pa. Children: 
Rosemary Anne (Getz), Patricia Cora, Frances Edvardine, Anne Louise. Widow lives in 
Stroudsburg, Pa. 
6. Frank (Francis) M. (18^6 - I89I) - m. Emma A. Cline (l857 - 1903) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine M. Kenp. Born in Lanier Twp., Preble Co., Ohio. Farmer 
in German Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. No children. 

6. (Joshua) Franklin (l8U9 - 1929) - m. Ella Eberle (18U9 - 193U) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine M. Kemp. Born in Lanier Twp., Preble Co., Ohio. Hard- 
ware dealer, Franklin, Ohio (Warren Co.) and Dayton, Ohio (Montgomery Co.). Also 
previously lived in German Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. Children: Jessie E. (Hamma 
- Benson), Mary Margaret. 



Franklin (also see Frank) 

8. Fred (Frederick) Stevenson (191U - m. 
Son of Charles H. and Hattie A. Ware. 



Beatrice Margrette Barrett (1920 - 

Born in Chelsea, Okla. Construction engin- 



eer. South Dayton, N. Y. Children: Charles Elias, Babette Allene. 

Fred Wahl (1923 - m. Dorothy June Tutt (1925 - 
Son of (Clinton) Lyle and Mamie L. McCarley. Born in Riverside, Calif. 
Chamber of Commerce, Pomona, Calif.; also lived in Corpus Christi, Tex.; 
Wise; and Whittier, Calif. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Array - Sgt. 
Keith Edward, Ann Lewis. 



Mana ger , 

Milwaukee, 

Children: 



7. Frederick (I88O - cl883). Son of James and Emma Drolinger, Pottawotamie Co., Kans. 

8. Frederick Carlisle (19U5 - . Son of Alfred F. and Anita M. Mattox, Temple, Pa. 

6. Frederick Gantz (cl858 - 1932) - m. Mary A. Enck (1858 - 1913) 

Son of William and Barbara Gantz. Farmer in Monroe Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. 
Onetime County Assessor and holder of other public offices, and salesman for an 
investment firm. Lived in Mechanicsburg, Pa. in later years. Children: Raymond M. 
and Maude (Swiler). 

9. Frederick Homer (19UU - . Son of Roscoe H. and Thelma E. Abbott, Blacksburg, Va. 

8. Fuller (I90h - m. Juanita Claire Kingswell (1911 - 

Son of Thomas J. and Amanda Kingery. Born in Tuscola, 111. Welder, Salem, Ore. 



Also lived in Mont., Colo., and Calif. 

225 



No children. 



PART C - REGISTER QF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES ^ 

10. Gary Alan (I95l - • Son of Forrest 0. and Annette B. Garras, Rockford, 111. 

10. Gary Lamar (1956 - . Son of Jackie L. and Freda M. Colet (Hiriton),Thorntown, Ind, 

9. Gary Paul (1953 - - Son of Donald P. and Dorothy Journsay, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

9. Gary Stephen (19U7 - . Son of Otto S. and Jane K. Westfall, Pasadena, Calif. 

Gene (see Eugene) 

h. George (cl772 - I838) - m. (Margaret Elizabeth ?) Catharine Hoke (I78O - I86U) 
Son of Jacob Bortner and Susanna (Meyer ?). Generally knovin as "Burtner", al- 
though he retained the "Bortner" name. Probably born in Lancaster Co., Pa. Farmer 
East Pennsborough Twp., West Pennsborough Twp., Southampton Twp., and Dickinson 
T-wp., Cumberland Co., Pa., and Dayton T-wp. (part now in Harrison Twp., North of 
Dayton), Montgomery Co., Ohio. Children: Henry, George Otterbein, Jacob, Samuel, 
Fannie (Kumler), John, Catharine (Pefflf>y), Joseph, and probably two other daughtej 
names unknown, who died young. Children changed their name to "Burtner". 

k. George (1797 - 1877) - m. Elizabeth (I808 - I876) \ 

Son of Peter Bortner and Elizabeth V/ayne. Changed name to "Burtner". Born in Codorj 
us Twp., York Co., Pa. Weaver in Latimore Twp., Adams Co., Pa. and Franklin Twp., 
York Co., Pa. Children: Henry, Christian, William, Magdalena (Lena - Hamilton), 
Susan (stokes), Jacob, Elizabeth (Betsey - Wolf), Sarah, Mary. W 

h. George (l802 - 1879) - m. Maria (Polly) Rowley (I807 - I898) 

Son of Philip Bortner (Burtner) and Margaret Negley. Changed name to "Burtner". 
Farmer in Harrison Twp. (formerly in Deer Twp., then Fawn Twp., then East Deer 
Twp.), Allegheny Co., Pa. Inherited part of his father's farm. Children: John N., 
George W. , Louisa Maria (Fleming), David Alter. \ 

6. George Addison (I86I - 1921) - m. (l) Mary Elizabeth Paules (I86U - 19U8); (2) 1 
Name unknown. Son of William and Barbara Gantz. Born in Monroe Twp., Cumberland l 
Co., Pa. Wholesale grocer in Altoona, Pa. Later lived in Aberdeen, Miss, and Littltf 
Rock, Ark. Children: (l) Clair Paul, Vance Harold; (2) Names unknown, if any. 

6. George C. (I867 - I868). Son of Samuel Jr. and Catharine May, Cumberland Co., Pa. 

9. George Cecil (1919 - m. Mary D'Orto (cl920 - 

Son of Harry K. and Nella M. Fultz. Plumber, Washington, D. C. Veteran of World 
War II - U. S. Navy. No children. 

7. George Clayton (I869 - 19UU) - m. Izora Frances Clatterbuck (cl867 - cl93U) 

Son of George P. and Mary Elizabeth Eakle. Born in Keezletoim, Va. (Rockingham 
Co.). Leather worker, Dayton and Harrisonburg, Va. (Rockingham Co.). Children: 
(William) Cecil, Richard Henry, Harry Kemper, Little WiUiett. 

9. George Edward (I9l5 - 19li5) - m. (l) Agnes Pelfney (cl9l5 - ; (2) (Eunice) Louise 
Woods (1923 - . Son of 0. Clarence and Lillie B. Whitesell. Born in Red Key, Ind. 
In U. S. Army in World War II - died in France. Children: (l) None; (2) George 
Edward Jr. Widow lives in Fultondale, Ala. 

226 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 
10. George Edvard Jr. (19UU - . Son of George E. and E. Louise Woods, Fultondale, Ala. 

7. George Henry (18^5 - 1930) - m. Sarah Catharine Wilson (l858 - 1925) 

Son of William 0. and Minerva Bo Ennis. Born near Westfield, 111. in Coles Co. 
Farmer in Douglas Co. and Edgar Co., 111.; near Pleasanton, Kans.; and near Lebanon, 
Ind. Children: Walter Sanford, Rosa Ellen (Rolison), James Albert, Stella Mary 
(Tiffin), Alice A. (Crosstreet), Laura Delia (Wbodard), Emma Minerva (Higgins), 
Charles Vfashington. 

8. George Homer (1919 - m. June Constance Lebeck (1921 - 

Son of Jesse H. and Marie W. Armbruster. Painting contractor, Petaluma, Calif. 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Arny - Sgt. Children: Patricia Jeanne, Janice 
Elaine, Cheryl Marie. 

7. George Konrad (1927 - m. Mary Celene Kraus (1933 - 

Son of Merrill G. and Florence M. Parker. Bom in Butler Co., Pa. Nuclear-re- 
search technician, Newport News, Va. Also in U. S, Navy for three years. Children: 
Kim Louise, Kathy Marie, George Merrill. 

8. George Merrill (1959 - . Son of George K. and Mary C. Kraus, Newport News, Va. 

7. George Norman (1912 - m. Annabelle Creighton (cl912 - 

Son of Albert G. and Joanna Creighton. Born in Duquesne, Pa. Welder, Larimer, Pa. 
Children: Gertrude Margaret (Ken^), Shirley Jean (Sanders), Harriet Lorraine 
(Blair), George William, Sylvia Ann, Robert Albert. 

5. George Otterbein (l802 - 1855) - m. Mary Ann Schuler (l80li - 1881;) 

Son of George Bortner (Burtner) and (Margaret Elizabeth ?) Catharine Hoke. Changed 
name to "Burtner". Farmer and tailor, Dayton Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio and near 
Ashmore and Westfield, 111. in Coles Co. Born in Cumberland Co., Pa. Children: 
Jacob L., William Otterbein, Catharine (Downey), Henry, Mary Ann, Samuel, Jeremiah, 
Fannie (Smith), Sophia Elizabeth (Melton), George Schuler, Barbara Ann (Sowers - 
Bragg), Simon Peter. 

6. George Peter (I832 - I89O) - m. (Maiy) Elizabeth Eakle (I83U - 1911) 

Son of Rev. Henry and Margaret Statler. Born near Leitersburg, Md.; also lived 
near Dayton, Va. (Rockingham Co.) in early life. Miller in Keezletown, Va. (Rock- 
ingham Co.), In Confedo Amy during part of Civil War - Sgt. Co. A, lii6th Va. 
Militia and Priv., 1st Va. Cav. Children: John Henry, Hiram Lewis, Mary Virginia 
(Barman), Lucy Alice, Fannie Lenore (Hanna-Maroney), George Clayton, Bertha Eakle, 
Richard H. 

8. George Robert (I887 - m. Dora Newsom (1892 - 

Son of Hiram L. and Elsie Cumraings. Born in Keezletown, Va, (Rockingham Co.). 
Civil engineer (highway, structural, l^draulics), Texas Highway Dep't., Tyler, 
Greenville, Marlin, Goldthwaite, and Dallas, Tex. Also in Cuba at onetime. 
Children: George Robert Jr. 

9. George Robert Jr. (1917 - m. Mary Ellen Pulliam (I918 - 

Son of George R. and Dora Newsom. Born in Tyler, Tex. Property controller. Sears, 
Roebuck & Co., Dallas, Tex. Veteran of World War II - U. S, Air Force - Corp. 
Children: Sidney Anne, George Robert III. 

227 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

10. George Robert III (19U9 - . Son of George R. Jr. and Mary E. Pulliam, Dallas, Tex. 

9. George Russell (192U - m. Florence Mildred Stewart (1926 - 

Son of Walter S. and Fannie M. Dunnigan. Brick and stone mason, Lebanon, Ind. 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army - Corp. Children: Sandra Kay, Barbara Susan, 
Cathy Lynn. 

9, George S. (1927 - m. Patricia Ann Butts (cl930 - 

Son of Samuel J. W. and Lena Kefauver. Farmer, near Clear Spring, Md. (Washington 
Co.). Children: Daniel George, Michael Paul, Henry Edwin, Linda Ann. 



!' 



I 



6. George Schuler (18U3 - 1937) - m. Jennie C. Durborow (cl8U8 - 1925) 

Son of George 0. and Mary Ann Schuler. Born in Dayton Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio.-: 
Also lived near Westfield and Ashmore, 111. (in Coles Co.) in early life. Farmer 
and carpenter, Tuscola Twp., Douglas Co., 111.; Ross Twp., Edgar Co., 111. and ; 
St. Cloud, Fla. Civil War veteran - Corp., 6lst, 68th, and 123rd 111. Inf. Child * 
rent Edna May (Goss), (George) Lloyd, Ethel (Reid-Reifschneider) . 1 

6. George Shoman (1856 - 1928) - m. (l) Rosa Weismiller (l85U - 1892); (2) Avalene 7 
Edwards (Turner) (l859 - 1935). Son of Daniel and Susan Rhinehart. Born in East . 
Pennsborough Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. Foreman of a construction crew for an 
electric utility, Muscatine, Iowa. Children: (l) Laura May (Griffin), Robert 
Daniel; (2) None. 

5. George W. (l835 - 1918) - m. Mary Ann Swartslander (I8UI4 - 1927) 

Son of George and Maria (Polly) Rowley. Farmer and laborer, Fawn Twp., Allegheny 
Co., Pa. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. D, 6th Pa. Heavy Art. Children: (George) 
Albert, Henry Grant, Margaret Caroline (Skillen), William Franklin. 

6. Rev. George Washington (I8I42 - 1916) - m. Mary Elizabeth Steffey (l8U5 - 1932) 

Son of Rev. John and Margaret Ann Berry. Born in Dayton Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio/ 
Also lived in Western Ind, and Eastern 111. in early life. Minister in United ^ 
Brethren Church, New Hebron, Parkersburg, Sumner, 111; Ploverville, Woodbridge, 
Gridley, and Olinda, Calif. Lived last years in San Jose, Calif. Onetime farmer 
and school-teacher. Civil War veteran - Corp. Co. H, Uth Mo. Eng. of the West; 
also in Co. D, 1st Mo. Eng. Children: John William, Martha Samenah, Elmer Clinton, 
(George) Homer, Jesse Herman, (Charles) Walton, Minnie Florence (Smith), Millie ' 
Flora, Edwin Russell. ,^1, 



I 



George Washington (l85l - I87I1) - Unmarried 
Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Fair. Born in Clearfield Twp., Butler Co., Pa, Laborer; 
near Tipton, Mo. (Moniteau Co.). 



8. C-eorge William (19U3 - • Son of George N. and Annabelle Creighton, Larimer, Pa, 
7. George Wirt (l882 - I887). Son of John E, and Susan B. Criswell, Butler Co., Pa, 



i 



10. Gerald Gene (1931 - m. Susan Naomi Edkin (1931 - 

Son of Herbert E. and Lorene G, Frye. Born in Kansas City, Kans. Salesman, oil- 
field pumps and valves, Tulsa and Pauls Valley, Okla.: Charleston, West Va.; Ash- 
land, Ky.; New Orleans, La. Adopted children: Sally Ann, Steven Paul. 

228 * 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Giles Paulins (1912 - m. Charlotte A. Heim (1915 - 

Son of Forest H. and Mary L. Giles. Born in Butler, Pa. Mechanical engineer, 
Rochester, N. Y. Lives in Webster, N, Y. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Air 
Corps. Children: Linda Joyce, Glenda Jo (Zobel), Karen Arlene, Bryan Paulins, 
Carl Alan. 

9. Glen William (19U7 - . Son of Roscoe H. and Thelma E. Abbott, Blacksburg, Va. 

8. Glenn Franklin (1911 - m. Louisa Mary Stackhouse (1909 - 

Son of Martin H. Jr. and Mary C. Evans. Printer, York, Pa. No children. 

9. Gordon Ellwood (1928 - ra. Geraldine Jeanette Porter (1926 - 

Son of John C. and Martha Hawley. Born in Corvallis, Ore. High-school teacher, 
Woodburn and Lebanon, Ore. Children: Cynthia Ann. 

8. Gorman Reed (l886 - I96I4) - m, (1) Olwen Hughes (I89O - • (2) Hilda Clen (1890 - 

I96I1). Son of Rev. Markwood Monroe and Margaret B. Reed. Bom near Chambersburg, 
Pa.; also lived in Washington and Oregon in early life. Druggist, Los Gatos, Calif. 
Children: (l) Evan Hugh, Ellen (Bevilacqua); (2) None, 

9. Gregory Lee (I9li9 - . Son of Richard L. and Marjorie F. Patrick (adopted), Akron, Ohio. 

8. Gregory Roy (1953 - . Son of Roy L. and Mary B. McLaughlin, near Butler, Pa. 

9. Harold Glenn (1928 - m. Theresa Rahe (1931 - 

Son of Henry S. and Ethel Overman. Born in Indianapolis, Ind. Employed by Borg- 
Warner Corp., Muncie, Ind. Children: Harold Glenn Jr., Margaret Louise, Barbara 
Joann, Charles Frederick. 

10. Harold Glenn Jr. (1951 - . Son of Harold G. and Theresa Rahe, Muncie, Ind. 
Harry (also see Henry) 

9. Harry Arthur (1953 - . Son of Harry R. and Theresa R. Lalonde, Detroit, Mich. 

7. Harry C. (1929 - m. Jennie Lee Taylor (1936 - 

Son of Forest H. and Mary L. Giles. Farmer, near Butler, Pa. Children; Kathy Lee, 
Dean Ray, Connie Lynn, Raylene Sue, Dwight Curtis, Colleen Joy. 

8. Harry Kemper (1893 - m. Nella Mildred Fultz (I89I - 

Son of George C. and Izora F. Clatterbuck. Born in or near Harrisonburg, Va. (Rock- 
ingham Co.). Auditor, Washington, D. C. Children: George Cecil, Mary Franklin 
(Sgueo), Harriet Mildred (Sellers -Rosenberg). 

8. Harry (Henry) Osmond (1932 - m. Evelyn Cerkvenik (1936 - 

Son of William L. Sr. and Helen Bullen, Fireman, N. Y. City Fire Dep't., Staten 

Island, N. Y. Children: Lee Ann, Laura, Henry, Paul, Joseph. 
8. Harry Robert (1926 - m. Theresa Rita Lalonde (1925 - 

Son of Harry W. (William Henry) and Emma R. Landrum. Final adjuster, Burroughs Corp., 

Detroit, Mich. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: Harry Arthur, 

Marsha Perscilla. 

229 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 



Harry William (1879 - 1928) - m. Emma Rachel Landrum (l89h - 1957) ff 

Son of John E. and Susan B. Criswell. Originally named "William Henry". Bom 
in Etna, Pa. (Allegheny Co.) probably. Engineer, Butler, Pa. and Detroit, Mich. 
In U. S. Navy at one time. Children; June Marie (Pettigrew-Parker-Alexander), 
Harry Robert. May have been married more than once; if so, no information con- 
cerning other wives or children. 

(Chalmers) Harvey (188G - m. Lula Spaur (l885 - 
Son of Herman J. and Nancy Welsh. Bom in Harrison T-wp., Allegheny Co., Pa. 
Carpenter, Carleton, Litchfield, and Lincoln, Nebr. Children: Frances Hester 
(Meier), Martha Lucille (Thompson). 



Henry (also see Harry) 



5. Rev. Henry (l800 - 1857) - m. Margaret Statler (or Stotler) (1796 - 1866) 

Son of George Bortner (Burtner) and (Margaret Elizabeth ?) Catharine Hoke. Changed 
name to "Burtner". Born in West Pennsborough Tvp. , Cumberland Co., Pa. Farmer 
and minister in United Brettiren Church, near Leitersburg, Md. (Washington Co.). and 
near Dayton, Va. (Rockingham Co.). Children: Solomon, Ezra, Mary A. (Coffman), 
George Peter, William Henry, (Margaret) Elizabeth Catharine (Coffman). 



ii 



5. Henry (cl825 - ? ) - Apparently unmarried. 

Son of George and Elizabeth . Bom in Franklin Tvjp., York Co., Pa. Laborer 

and hostler, Franklin Twp. York Co., Pa. and East Pennsborough Twp., Cumberland 
Co., Pa. Lived in latter place in 1880 - - last known location. 

6. Henry (1832 - 1892) - m. Malinda Hackett (Burtner) (1827 - 1916) 

Son of George 0. and Mary Ann Schuler. Born in Dayton Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. 
Farmer in Coles and Douglas Counties, 111. and near Jasper, Mo. Civil War veteran 

- Priv. Co. E, 123rd 111. Inf. Married widow of his brother, Jacob. Children: 
Martha (Mattie). For step-children, see family of brother. 

5. (George) Henry (l85U - 1926) - m. Catharine Tucker (1855 - 19U3) 

Son of Jacob and Martha Byerly. Farmer in Harrison Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. (form- 
erly in East Deer Twp.). Children: Martha Mabel (Kennedy), Aseneth Desmond (Moor 
head), Helen (Austen). 

9. Henry (l96l - . Son of Harry (Henry) 0. and Evelyn Cerkvenik, Staten Island, No Y. 

10. Henry Edwin (1955 - . Son of George S. and Patricia A. Butts, Clear Spring, Md. 



i 



6. Henry Grant (1867 - 1952) - m. Delia Irwin (1869 - 19U6) 

Son of George W. and Mary Ann Swartslander. Born in Fawn Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. 
(now in Harrison Twp.). High-school teacher, Tarentum and Natrona Heights, Pa. 
(Allegheny Co.). Children: Raymond Irwin, Inez Tola, Francis True, Walter Russell*, 
Wilbur Leroy, Elva Loretta, Chester Vincent. 

6. (William) Henry Harrison (18U3 - 1930) - m. Josephine Muder (cl8l;9 - 1889) 

Son of Philip and Rebecca Shobert. Born in Freeport, Pa. Blacksmith in early life; 
later oil-driller and -gauger, Saxonburg, Oakdale, and Mt. Lebanon, Pa. and Sand 
Spring, Okla. Civil-war veteran. Children: Charles Herman, Elsie (Sparks), EstelLi 
M. (Wilson-Wagner), Anna, Josephine (Scott), Albaretta Elizabeth (Stevenson). 

230 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Henry K. (I898 - I9I8) 

Son of David H. and Florence Knott. Born in Greensboro, N. C. In U. S. krmy in 
World War I. Died in Battle of Chateau Thierry. 

8. Henry Milton (192? - . m. Name unknown 

Son of G. Walton Sr. and Irene Charlson. Born and lives in Terra Bella, Calif, 
No other information. 

8. Henry Samuel (I887 - 1959) - m. Ethel Overman (I889 - 1959) 

Son of Marion A. and Hannah J. Stackhouse. Born near Broadlands, 111. (Champaign 
Co.). Employee of the Hoover Company, Indianapolis and Muncie, Ind. Children: 
Willard Marvin, Lowell Maurice, Henrietta June (Jefferis), Kenneth Clare, Harold 
Glenn. 

8. Henry Thomas (I886 - 1918) - m. Name unknown 

Son of Thomas J. and Amanda Kingery. Born in Tuscola, 111. (Douglas Co.). Farmer 
and laborer, Miles City, Mont, and Rawlins, Wyo . Children: Daughter, name unknown. 

9. Herbert Eugene (190? - m. Lorene Gertrude Frye (I906 - 

Son of Snowden 0. and Sarah J. Lee. Born in Kansas City, Kans. Branch manager, 
distributor of oil-field equipment and supplies, Lafayette, La. Children: Patricia 
Ann (Ashlock), Gerald Gene. 

7. Herman George (1910 - 1961) - m. Edla Johnson (l91ii - 

Son of Loyal H. and Minnie Hermsmeyer. Born in Spokane, Wash. Enployee of State 
Agricultural Soil Conservation Office, Circle, Jordan, and Chinook, Mont. Children: 
Mary Kay (Thompson), Nancy Jane, Patricia Ann, John David. Widow lives in Cumberland, 
Iowa. 

5. Herman Jacob (185? - I918) - m. Nancy Welsh (l85l - 192U) 

Son of Jacob and Martha Byerly. Originally named "Jacob Harmon". Born in Harrison 
Twp. (then in East Deer Twp.), Allegheny Co., Pa. Farmer near Carlton and Litch- 
field, Nebr. Children: Loyal Holmes, Hester Villa (Estabrook), (Chalmers) Harvey, 
Martin Herman, Martha Mary (McCollum). 

7. Hiram Lewis (l857 - 1936) - m. Elsie Cummings (cl860 - cl9i4l) 

Son of George P. and Mary Elizabeth Eakle. Miller, Keezletown, Va. (Rockingham 
Co.). Also lived in Penn Laird, Va. Children: Ethel Cummings, George Robert, Irma 
Eakle. 

8. Hobart Dudley (I896 - 1956) - Unmarried 

Son of Johnson A. and Emma Deputy. Artist in Dayton, Va. (Rockingham Co.). 

9. Hobart Elmer (1903 - m. Sabina Pearl Reiber (1907 - 

Son of VJalter S. and Mary Alice Rolison. Born in Clark Co., 111. Millwright, 
Lebanon, Ind. In U, S. Army for four years. Children: Leo Albert, Basil Eugene, 
Delmar Raygene, Bernard Ivan, Howard Noble. 

6. Holmes (I896 - Unmarried 

Son of (Martin) Luther and Ellen Harvey. Farmer and security guard. Lives on home- 
stead of his great grandfather, Philip Bortner, in Harrison Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. 

231 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMHIKS 

(George) Homer (l875 - 1962) - m. Emma Lou Moore (I878 - 

Son of Rev. George Washington and Mary E. Steffey. Bom in Lawrence, 111. Retail- 
store accountant, San Jose and Cupertino, Calif. Children: Mildred Louise (Martin) . ' 
Widow lives in Santa Clara, Calif. 



I 



9. Homer Leslie (1903 - m. (Jessie) Lucille Paul (190U - - 

Son of James A. and L. Maude Salter. Born near Norborne, Mo. (Carroll Co.). Civil,, 
engineer, Lawrence and Parsons, Kans. and Springfield, Mo. Children: Raymond Paul, 
Hugh Weldon, James Robert, Homer Leslie Jr. ''i 

10. Homer Leslie Jr. (19U5 - m. Judy Wright (19U5 - 

Son of Homer L. and Lucille Paul. Born in Springfield, Mo. Student, Alaska Method- 
ist University, Anchorage, Alaska. No children. ^ 

7. Homer Paul (I868 - 193U) - m. Anna Vesta Stover (1877 - 196U) f 

Son of Rev. William H. and Perthena F, Paul. Born in Mt. Clinton, Va. (Rockingham , 
Co.). Farmer, Mt. Clinton and Mt. Solon, Va. Children: Marion McKinley, Mabel 
Stover (Crossen), Byard Bayliss, Madge Frances (Wilfong), Margaret J. (Smith), * 
Olga (Hawkins), Edward Carl, Albert Paul, Roscoe Homer, Vada Vesta, Beda Violet ,\ 
(McMahan). 

8. Horace Albert (I887 - 1955) - m. Elworth Inez Parrish (1893 - 

Son of Benjamin F. and Lucy Foraker. Born in Rockwall, Tex, Druggist in Rockwall 
and Roxton, Tex. Children: (Benjamin) Parrish, Llewellyn (Snell). Widow lives in 
Roxton, Tex. 



f 



4 



8. Horace Perkins (I888 - m. Nora Ellen Busbey (I888 - 1937) 

Son of Thomas J. and Amanda Kingery. Born near Tuscola, 111. (Douglas Co.). Farmer- 

and laborer, Miles City, Mont. No children. 

-1 

7. Rev. (John) Howard (1903 - m. Alva Wall (I9II - 

Son of Rev. Edward 0. and Helen Rauch. Born in Hummelstown, Pa. Minister in the 
United Brethren Church for seven years; now minister of Brookfield Bible Church 
(non-denominational), Harrisburg, Pa. Lives near Middletown, Pa. No children. 

10. Howard Noble (19U0 - m. Patricia Louise Huntley (19U3 - ••p 

Son of Hobart E. and Sabina P. Reiber. Born in or near Lebanon, Ind. Special- 
products assembler, R. C. A. plant, Indianapolis, Ind. Lives in Danville, Ind. 
Children: Michael Joseph. 



8. Howard Vfyand (I89U - m. (Reta) Louise Miller (1900 - 

Son of Osceola W. and Katie Wyand. Born near Sharpsburg, Md. Farmer. In U. S. 
Soil Conservation Service, Keedysville, Hd. (Washington Co.). Children: Roger 
Ellsworth, Edwin Russell. 

8. (Jesse) Hubert (cl9l5 - m. Name unknovm 

Son of Jesse H. and Marie W. Armbruster. Probably born in San Jose or Petaluma, 
Calif. No other information, except lives in Tucson, Ariz. 



232 



\s\ 



i 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

10. Rev. Hugh Weldon (193U - m. Mary Ellen Amerman (1936 - 

Son of Homer L, and Lucille Paul. Born in Huntsville, Ala. Methodist minister, 
Bentonville and Rogers, Ark.; Sedalia and Napoleon, Mo.; Hebron and Naperville, 
111. Children: Karen Lynn, Pamela Sue, Beth Ellen. 

S. Isaac Paulins (l8U9 - 1927)-m. Amanda Jane Singer (l850 - 1933) 

Son of Jacob and Martha Byerly. Born in Harrison Twp. (then in East Deer Twp.), 

Allegheny Co., Pa. Farmer in Harrison Tv/p., Allegheny Co. and Jefferson Twp., 

Butler Co., Pa. Children: Roy Irving, Dorsey Paulins, Ethel Leah, Forest Harmon, 
Clare Singer. 

Jack (see John, Jonathan) 

9. Jackie Lamar (1935 - m. Freda May Colet (Hiriton) (1935 - 

Son of Walter S. and Fannie M. Dunnigan. Born in Lebanon, Ind . Brick mason, 
Thorntovin, Ind. In U. So Air Force for eleven years. Children: Gary Lamar, Walter 
Sanford II, Kenneth Jay, Robert Cecil, Jackie Lee, Randy Dean. 

10. Jackie Lee (1963 - 1963). Son of Jackie L. and Freda M. Colet (Hiriton), Lebanon, Ind. 

h. Jacob (cl799 - 1B27) - m. Sarah (Ekas ?) (cl8lO - l85l) 

Son of John Bortner (Burtner) and Christina Emerich, Sometimes erroneously called 
"Burtner"; although he did not change his name. Born in Pine Grove Twp., Berks Co., 
Pa. probably. Farmer in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Children: Andrew (Burtner). 

5. Jacob (1808 - 1886) - m. Catharine Margaret Kemp (1816 - 1386) 

Son of George Bortner (Burtner) and (Margaret Elizabeth ?) Catharine Hoke. Changed 
his name to "Burtner". Born in Cumberland Co., Pa. Farmer in Dayton Twp. (Part 
now in Mad River Twp.), Montgomery Co., Ohio; Lanier Twp., Preble Co., Ohio; and 
German Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. Children: Mary Julia A. (Coffman), Lucinda 
(Zehring), Sarah Ann (Zehring), Abrara (Abraham) K., Joseph Peter, Jacob John, 
(Joshua) Franklin, Francis (Frank) M. 

U. Jacob (1811; - 1863) - m. Martha Byerly (1822 - 1901) 

Son of Philip Bortner (Burtner) and Margaret Negley. Changed his name to "Burtner". 
Born in Deer Twp. (part later called Fawn Township, East Deer Twp., and presently 
Harrison Twp.), Allegheny Co., Pa. Farmer. Inherited part of his father's farm, 
including homestead. Children: Susanna, John Negley, Margaret Jane (Huey), Isaac 
Paulins, Jacob Harmon (Herman Jacob), (George) Henry, Mary Lavina (Hunter), Martha 
Wilhelmina (Batching), Philip Augustus, (Martin) Luther. 

5. Jacob (l3hl - 1922) Unmarried. 

Son of George and Elizabeth . Born in Franklin Twp., York Co., Pa. Labor- 
er and onetime stage-coach driver. York Springs and York, Pa. (York Co.). Civil 
War veteran - Priv. Co. B, ll;9th Pa. Inf. 

7. Jacob Harp (I878 - m. Mary Julia Friend (cl882 - 1957) 

Son of Ezra and Sarah E. Harp. Farmer, near Boonsboro, Md. (Washington Co.). 
Inherited parents' farm. Children: Sarah Elizabeth (Conner), Rosemary, Jacob 
Henry, Walden Harp. 

8. Jacob Henry (1918 - cl926). Son of Jacob H. and Mary J. Friend, Boonsboro, Md. 

233 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THB I R FAM ILIES 

6. Jacob John (CI8I46 - 1913) - m. Mary Ann Huston (iQhh - 193U) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine M. Kenp. Probably born in Lanier Twp., Preble Co., Ohioj 
if not, in Mad -River Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. Farmer near West Alexandria, Ohio 
(Preble Co.). Children: Alice Louise (Schunke), Grace I. (Hill), Nellie H. (Rhine 
hart). 

6. Jacob L. (1826 - 1862) - m. (l) Leah Evinger (I828 - l8U9); (2) Malinda Hackett 
(1827 - 1916). Son of George 0. and Mary Ann Schuler. Born in Dickinson Twp., 
Cumberland Co., Pa. Also lived in Dayton Twp., Montgonery Co., Ohio in early life. 
Farmer in Coles Co. and Douglas Co., 111. Children: (l) Benjamin Franklin, 
William Henry; (2) (Mary) Elizabeth (Watkins), Thomas Jefferson, Alvaretta, Amanda 
(Minnie - Hoots), Millard Fillmore, Charles Jacob, Lucy Jane (Parsons). Widow 
married Henry Burtner, brother of Jacob L. ^ 

6. James (I8U8 - 1936) - m. Emma Drolinger (cl855 - 1926) 

Son of William and Margaret Griner. Born in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Farmer 
in Clinton Twp., Butler Co., Pa.; Blue Twp., Pottawotamie Co., Kans.; and near 
Manhattan, Kans. Lived last years in Lafayette, Ind. Children; Nellie, Frederick, * 
William, Eva (Potter), Grace (Wilmer), James Jr. >^ 

7. James Jr. (I886 - 1897). Son of James and Emma Drolinger, near Manhattan, Kans. 

8. James (cl900 - cl905). Son of David H. and Florence Knott, Greensboro, N. C. 

8. James Albert (I88O - 1957) - m. (Lillie) Maude Salter (I88O - 

Son of George H. and Sarah C. Wilson. Born in Edgar Co., 111. Farmer in early 
life; onetime manager of a coal-mine; construction contractor. Lived near Nor- 
borne and Marshfield, Mo. Children: Lillie Edith (Herring), Naomi E. (Smith - 
Mulcahy), Homer Leslie, (Anna) Mildred (Malone-Watson-Yankee), James Elmer, Clair 
Virginia (McNabb), Mary Martha (Breesee), Eleanor lone (Williamson). Widow lives in 
Springfield, Mo. 

6. James Andrew (I87O - 1938) - m. Katherine Fletcher (I869 - 1939) 

Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Emerick. Born in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Also 
lived briefly in early life in Morgan Co., Mo. Carpenter in railroad-car shops, 
Trafford, Irwin, Larimer, and Swissdale, Pa. and in Youngstown, Ohio. Children; 
Arnold, James Bernard, Earl. 

7. James Andrew (1883 - 19hl) - m. Mary Margaret Frey (I88I - I96U) 

Son of Martin H. and Lydia M. Knaub (Strickler). Born in Dillsburg, Pa. (York 
Co.). Farmer in Lower Windsor Twp., York Co., Pa. Children; Mildred May (Hafer), 
Clair Martin, Ruth Elizabeth (Young) . 

7. James Bernard (I896 - m. Mary Francis Campbell (1899 - 

Son of James A. and Katherine Fletcher. Born in Irwin, Pa. Secretary and clerk, 
Youngstown, Ohio and Miami, Fla. Veteran of World War I - U. S. Arn^^ Engineers. 
Children; Ruth (Lees). 

9. James Charles (I9l;8 - . Son of Charles W. and Shirley J. Clark, San Diego, Calif. 



<i 



23k 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. James Criswell (1870 - 1932) - m. Carrie Block (1879 - 

Son of John E. and Susan B. Criswell. Born in Clinton Twp., Butler Co., Pa, Oil- 
drilling contractor, Butler Co., Pa. and Wooster, Ohio. Children: BeulahBeatrice 
(Conte), James Crisswell Jr. Widow lives in Houston, Tex. 

8. James Crisswell (1921 - m. Roberta Frances Graber (1920 - 

Son of James C. and Carrie Block. Born in Wooster, Ohio. Petroleum engineer, 
Houston, Tex. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Ari^y - 1st Lt. Children: Susan 
Joan, James Crisswell III. 

9. James Crisswell III (1952 - . Son of James C. and Roberta F, Graber, Houston, Tex. 

11. James David (1955 - • Son of Raymond P. and Margaret S. Andrews, Springfield, Mo, 

9. James Edwin (1915 - m. Billy Mae Cheney (1921 - 

Son of James Paul and Mamie Burch. Born in Rockwall, Tex. Process foreman, Pan 
American Petroleum Corp., Levelland, Tex. Also lived in Sand Springs, Okla. and 
Los Angeles, Calif. Veteran of World War II - U, S. Air Corps - Sgt. Children: 
James Paul, Mark Edwin. 

9. James Elmer (1909 - m. Lawaun Moore (1915 - 

Son of James Albert and L. Maude Salter. Born in Norborne, Mo. Iron-worker, 
Hebron, Ind. Children: Marilyn Mansfield (Ingram). 

8. James Emory (1928 - ra. Virginia Ann Cole (193U - 

Son of Evers and Mary E, Dubois. Bom in Lynn, Mass. Accounting clerk, Lawrence, 
Mass. Lives in Hampstead, N. H. Children: David Scott, Nancy Jean. 

10. James Eric (i960 - . Son of Carroll L. and Mary A. Cashour, near Frederick, Md. 

6. James Henry (l859 - 1933) - m. Flora Adelaide Burson (i860 - cl936) 

Son of Rev, John and Margaret Ann Beriy. Born in Fayette Twp., Vigo Co., Ind. 
Also lived in early life in Vermillion, 111. Railroad General Agent, Riverside 
and San Gabriel, Calif. Children: Mabel Henrietta. 

10. James Kevin (196U - . Son of Lowell D. and Juanita A. Nesselrodt, Keezletown, Va. 

9. James Lee (i960 - . Son of Janice A. Burtner, San Jose, Calif. 

8. James Paul (l89U - m. Mamie Burch (l889 - 

Son of Benjamin F. and Lucy Foraker. Born in Rockwall, Tex. Store owner. White 
Face, Tex. and Sand Springs, Okla. Children: James Edwin, Louis Allen, Robert Earl, 
Paul, Sarah Lou (Pryse). 

10. James Paul (191^6 - . Son of James E. and Billie M. Cheney, Levelland, Tex. 

8. James Price (1910 - m. Oneida Crawford (1910 - 

Son of William and Del^a F. Price. Born in Bayfield, Colo. Locomotive engineer. 
Southern Pacific R. R. , Durango, Colo.; Berkeley, Richmond, and Pomona, Calif.; 
El Paso, Tex. Children: Simeon J., Billie Lou. 

235 



PARI C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. James Richard (1939 - m. Charlotte lynne Kauf (19U3- 

Son of Merrill G. and Florence M. Parker. Steel-mill employee, near Butler, Pa. 
Children: Holly Lynns. 

10. James Robert (I9li0 - m. Doris Marie Middlebrooks (19U1 - 
Son of Homer L. and Lucille Paul. Born in Parsons, Kans. In U. S. Arny-Capt. 
Presently in Indianapolis, Ind. Children: James Robert II, Christopher Brooks. 

9. James Robert (1961 - . Son of William L. and Phyllis J. Schell,Mechanicsburg,Pa. 

11. James Robert II (1963 - . Son of James R. and Doris M. Middlebrooks, Indianapolis. 

10. James Scott (1957 - . Son of Sheldon K.Jr. and Joann Smith, Canal Winchester, 0. 
10, James Steven (196U - , Son of Rev. Roger E. and Sylvia Creager, in Nigeria. 
10. Jason David (1963 - . Son of David D. and Vanessa J. Johnson, New Haven, Conn. 

5. Jefferson (l8U5 - 1913) - m. Emma J. McCarrier (cl85U - 1927) 

Son of Philip and Elizabeth Murdock. Bom in East Deer Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. 
Clerk of Courts in Butler Co., Pa. Plumber and gas-fitter, Butler, Pa. and 
Harrisburg, Pa. (in State Capitol). Lived in Canp Hill, Pa. (suburb of Harris- 
burg). Civil War veteran - Corp. Co. E, 103rd Pa. Inf. (lost his leg). Children: 
Dora Ethel, (Lida) Katherine (Deen), Alfred Tennyson. 

10. Jeffery Allan (I960 - . Son of Allan C. and Anna M. Frost, San Jose, Calif. 

8. Jeffrey Alan (1962 - . Son of Vdlliam F.Jr. and Lauretta L.Gunpp,New Kensington, Pa. " 
8. Jeffrey Lance (1958 - . Son of David S. and Dixie C. Stroup, Butler, Pa. 

8. Jeffrey Russel (1957 - . Son of Russel S. and Freda M.Holsapfel, Greenville, Pa. 

6. Jeremiah (I836 - I88I) 

Son of George 0. and Mary Ann Schuler. Bom in Dayton Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. 
Also lived in Coles Co. and Douglas Co., 111. No other infonnation. ' 

10. Jerry Lynn (196U - . Son of Paul and Eula Gibson, Buena Park, Calif. 

7. Jesse Herman (1877 - 19Ul) - m. Marie Wilhelmina Arrabruster (l881i - 193li) 

Son of Rev. George VJashington and Mary E.Steffey. Probably born in Ploverville, 
Calif. Carpenter in San Jose and Petaluma, Calif. Children: (Jesse) Hubert, 
George Homer, Robert William. 

8. Joel Leslie (l96l - . Son of David S. and Dixie C Stroup, Butler, Pa. 

3. John (1765 - 1833) - m. (1) Christina Eraerich (cl770 - cl820); (2) Mary 

(cl770 - ? ). Son of Philip Bortner and Maria Elisabetha Velt. Sometimes ^ 

called "Burtner", although he retained the "Bortner" name. Bom in Bethel Twp., 
Berks Co., Pa. Farmer in Pine Grove Twp., Berks Co.; Pitt Twp., Allegheny Co.; 
and Buffalo Twp. (part now in Clinton Twp.), Butler Co., Pa. Children: Philip, 
Jacob, Barbara (Haws), Elizabeth (^yan), William, Catharine (Emerick), Mary(Hkas), , 
Christina, Daniel, Andrew. (2) None. Either sons or grandsons changed their 
name to "Burtner". j 



236 



PART C -REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILI ES 

h. John (1803 - 1881) Unmarried 

Son of Peter Bortner and Elizabeth Wayne . Sometimes called "Burtner", although he 
retained the '*Bortner" name. Farm laborer, Franklin Tovnship, York Co., Pa. 

5. John (I81U - 1875) - m. Sarah Molmesmith (cl8?7 - ? ) 

Son of Samuel and Elizabeth Fought. Farmer in East Pennsborough and Silver Spring 
Twps., Cumberland Co., Pa. Children: (Sarah) Mary (Walters), Blanche. 

$. John (cl8l5 - cl82_). Son of Philip and Ellen Gallagher, Butler Co., Pa. 
Probably carried "Bortner" name. 

5. Rev. John (I816 - 1885) - m. Margaret Ann Berry (l821 - 1902) 

Son of George Bortner (Burtner) and (Margaret Elizabeth ?) Catharine Hoke. Changed 
his name to "Burtner". Born in Dickinson Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa.; also lived in 
Dayton T-wp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. Minister in United Brethren Church in Clark Co., 
111.; near Charleston, 111. (Coles Co.); near Perrysville, Ind. (Vermillion Co.); 
near New Goshen, Ind. (Vigo Co.); and in Vermillion, 111. (Edgar Co.). Children: 
Emellne (Maxwell), Serenah Julet (Owen), George Washington, Pamelia (Dick), John 
Ezra, David Smith, James Henry. 

I4. John (1821 - 1833). Son of Philip Bortner (Burtner) and Margaret Negley, Allegheny 
Co., Pa, Probably carried the "Bortner" name. 

7. John (1859 - 1881) Unmarried 

Son of William 0. and Minerva B, Ennis. South Homer Twp., Champaign Co., Ill, 

10. John Allen (1953 - . Son of B. Parrish and Nancy J, Womack, Clarksville, Tex. 

11. John Andrew (1953 - . Son of Arnold A. and Betty Dulin, Medaryville, Ind. 

8. John Cole (l895 - 1950) - m. Martha Hawley (l895 - 19U5) 

Son of Rev, Markwood Monroe and Margaret B, Reed. Bom in West Fairview, Pa. (Cum- 
berland Co.). Head of News Bureau, Oregon State College, Corvallis, Ore. Also 
onetime Professor of Journalism there. Veteran of World War I - U, S, Arny. Child- 
ren: Robert Wallace, Gordon Ellwood, Barbara Nell. 

9. John Daniel (1962 - . Son of Larry A. and Mary Ann Heineraan, Butler, Pa, 
8. John David (19U9 - . Son of Herman G. and Edla Johnson, Boulder, Mont. 

6. John (Otis) Dickson (l865 - 19li3) - m. (l) Name unknown; (2) Anna Nauman (cl880 - 

Son of Daniel and Susan Rhinehart. Bom near Bridgeport, Pa.; also lived in Cum- 
berland Co., Pa. and Muscatine, Iowa. Shoe merchant; later insurance agent, in 
Waterloo, Iowa. Councilman in Waterloo for many years; President of Council from 
19U0. No children. Widow lives in Waterloo, Iowa. 

6. John E. (1856 - CI932) - m. (1) Minnie (2) Name unknown 

Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Emerick. Born in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co,, Pa, Also 
lived for a few years in Morgan Co,, Mo. Onetime coal-miner in Randolph Co., Mo, 
Custodian of public library, Duquesne, Pa, (Allegheny Co,). Children: (?) Margaret 
(Miller), and a son, name unknown (who probably died young). 

237 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. John Edward (l8U5 - 1917) - m. Susannah (Susan) Bell Criswell (18U9 - 1930) 

Son of Philip and Rebecca Shobert. Born in Freeport, Pa. (Armstrong Co.). Farme 
laborer, and store clerk in Jefferson Twp., Clinton Twp., '".enter Twp., and Saxon- 
burg, Butler Co., Pa.; Etna, Pa.; Wirt Co., West Va . ; Barberton, Ohio. Lived in c 
near Butler, Pa. when he died. Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. C, 100th Pa. Inf. 
Children: James Criswell, Rebecca, (Jonathan) Edmund, Norman Philip, Ti^lliam Henr 
(Harry William), George Wirt, Katherine May, Eliza (Lydia) Jane (Huselton), Letit 
Vernell (Hill), (Zella) Mable (Stampfle), Teressa May (Baldwin). 

6. John Ezra (l8h9 - 1869). Son of Rev. John and Mary A. Berry, Vermillion, 111. 

7. John Finley (1911 - m. Anna Martha Petshot (1903 - 

Son of Edward J. and Cora L. Dodds. Born in Lebanon, Ohio. Steel-mill employee, 
Pittsburgh and Butler, Pa. No children: 

7. John Henry (l8$6 - 1856). Son of George P. and Elizabeth Eakle, Keezletown, Va. 

8. John Henry (19U6 - . Son of Warren E. and Ruth C. Martin, Hummelstown, Pa. 

9. John J. (19U6 - . Son of Samuel J. W. and Lena Kefauver, Hagerstown, Md, 

5. John N. (1832 - 1906) - ra. Elizabeth Hepler (I832 - 1919) 

Son of George and Maria (Polly) Rowley. Born in East Deer Twp.(now in Harrison 
Twp.), Allegheny Co., Pa. Clerk in paper store, Freeport, Pa. (Armstrong Co.). 
No children. 

5. John Negley (l8ii3 - 1932) - m. Eliza Belle Logan {lQh9 - 19l8) f 

Son of Jacob and Martha Byerly. Born in East Deer Twp. (now in Harrison Twp.), 
Allegheny Co., Pa. Farmer, Jefferson Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Civil Warveteran - 
Corp. Co. D, 6th Pa. Heavy Art. Children: Charles, Mary L. (George), Nannie M., i 
Blanche M. (McChesney), Edward John, Merrill George. r 

8. John Paul (1927 - m. Marj- Fasulo (1932 - 

Son of William L. and Hellen Bullen. Track-maintenance worker, N. Y. City Transi 
Authority, Staten Island, N. Y. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Coast Guard. 
Children: John William, Richard Stanley, David Paul, Mary Ellen. Doris Elizabeth. 

5. John Peter (181|7 - ? ) 

Son of Martin Bortner (Burtner) and Sarah Ernst. No information after I87O, when 
he was living with widowed mother in Franklin Twp., York Co., Pa. May have carrie. 
either "Bortner" or "Burtner" name. 

9. John Preston (1962 - . Son of Paul E. and Donna Boyer, Cumberland Co., Pa. 

6. John Wesley (cl876 - 196U) - m. Susan Snyser (cl876 - 1932) 

Son of Christian and Elizabeth Kapp. Laborer, Dillsburg, Pa. (York Co.). Also 
lived in Monroe Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. Children: Maybert I., Katherine E., 
Paul Smyser. 

6. John Wesley (1882 - I96U) m. Rhoda Reedy (cl885 - ? ) 

Son of David A. and Catherine A. Beale. Coal miner, near Tarentum, Pa. (Allegheny 
Co.). Also lived in Oakmont, Pa. No children. 

238 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

S. John William (181? - 1919) - m. (1) Mary Erne line Stevenson (cl8U5 - I89I4); (2) 

Anna (Abbott) (I87I - ? ). Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Fair. Originally 

named "William John". Born in Butler Co., Pa. Farmer, Butler Co., Pa.; near 
Oswego, Ind.; Kansas; near Tipton, Mo. (Moniteau Co.); Rennick, Mo. (Randolph Co.); 
Sedalia, Mo. (Petit Co.); Webster Groves, Mo.; Big Sandy, Mont.; and Nestor, Calif. 
Civil War veteran - Priv. Co. A and Co. C, lOth 111. Cav. Children: (l) Alpha, 
Minnie (>borfield); (2) None. 

7. John William (I868 - I886). Son of Rev. George Washington and Mary E. Steffey, Calif. 

8. John William (19U1 - . Son of Paul S. and Jean P. Kuhn, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

9. John William (195U - . Son of John P. and Mary Fasulo, Staten Island, N, Y. 

7. Johnson Ashby (i860 - I9I4O) - m. (Mary) Emma Deputy (I863 - 19Ul) 

Son of Solomon and Harriet Ann Dudley. Carpenter, Dayton, Va. (Rockingham Co.). 
Children: Charles Forrest, Hobart Dudley, Fannie Bell (Osmun), Frank, Helen Gould 
(Webb), Sarah Ashby (Hester), 

10. Jon Patrick (1953 - • Son of Robert E. and Jane L. Robards, Wasco, Calif. 

5. Joseph (1821 - 1901) - m. (l) Elizabeth Miller (cl8l9 - cl890); (2) Amanda Williams 

(1832 - 1902). Son of George Bortner (Burtner) and (Margaret Elizabeth ?) Catharine 
Hoke. Changed his name to "Burtner". Born in Dickinson Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. 
Farmer, Dayton Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio and Lanier Twp., Preble Co., Ohio. Retired 
inAnderson, Ind. Children: (l) Mary C. (Mause), Sarah E. (Brower); (2) None. 

9. Joseph (1963 - . Son of Harry (Henry) 0. and Evelyn Cerkvenik, Staten Island, N. Y. 

8. Joseph Albert (I89I - 1892). Son of Thomas J. and Amanda Kingery, Douglas Co., 111. 

6. Joseph D. (CI85I4 - ? ) 

Son of Peter and Helen (Dennis ?). Born in Cincinnati, Ohio. No record after I87O 
when he was in his father's household. Suspect that he died in l870's. 

6. Joseph Peter (18U2 - 1929) - m. Elizabeth Campbell (I8U3 - 1930) 

Son of Jacob and Catharine M. Kemp. Born in Dayton Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. 
Farmer, near West Alexandria, Ohio (Preble Co.). Children: William Loren, Alice J. 
(Livingston), Charles Jo (or I. ?). 

7. flharles) Keith (I9I6 - m. Mary E. Greer (1922 - 

Son of Forest and Mary L. Giles. Blacksmith in steel mill, Butler, Pa. Children: 
Nancy E. (Heberling), Janet A., Don Charles, Bruce Keith. 

9. Keith Edward (1957 - . Son of Fred W. and Dorothy J. Tutt, Pomona, Calif. 

8. (Conrad) Kenneth (1882 - 19^2) - m. Zelma Ann Howe (1689 - 19U0) 

Son of Thomas J. and Amanda Kingery. Farmer, near Tuscola, 111. (Douglas Co.). 

Also lived briefly near Miles City, Mont. Children: Mary June, Marjorie Ann (Kearns). 



239 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Kenneth Clare (1917 - m. (l) Dorothy ; (?) Vivian Reed (cl920 - 

Son of Henry S. and Ethel Overman. Lives in Muncie, Ind. No children. 

!j 
8. Kenneth Edward (1935 - m. Pauline Patricia Smith (1939 - 

Son of Edward B. and Lenora 0. Hall. Born in California, Mo.; also lived in Tac- 
oma, Wash. In U. S. Navy since 1953; Yeoman; Quonset Point, R. I.; Honolulu, 
Hawaii; Streamwood, 111. Children: Michael Kenneth, Teresa Lenore, Nancy Lynn. 

10. Kenneth Jay (1959 - . Son of Jackie L. and Freda M. Colet (Hiriton), Thorntown,Ind, 

8. Kenneth Leroy (1910 - 1955) - m. (l) Agnes Morrison (cl910 - ; (2) Gwendolyn Lor- 

raine Vfatkins (1912 - . Son of G. Lloyd and Minnie M. Baker. Service and parts 
manager for an auto agency, Decatur, 111. Children: (l) None; (2) Roger Leroy, 
Ruth Lorraine (Lichtenberger) . 

9. Kenneth Leroy (1962 - . Son of Kenneth W. and Yvette T. Follinger, Verdun, France. 

10. Kenneth Robert (1951 - » Son of Robert K. and Mona J. Leadinghouse, La Habra, Cal. 

8. Kenneth William (1930 - m. Yvette T. Follinger (1936 - 

Son of Raymond I. and Elva E. Hemphill. Born in Harrison Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. 
In U. S. Array since 1951 - Sgt. - Aircraft-maintenance supervisor, Verdun, France. 
Previously in Germany, Japan, and Formosa, as well as U. S. Children: Theresa Ann, 
Alan Wayne, Kenneth Leroy, Christine Joyce. 

10. (Michael) Kent (1958 - . Son of Sherwin M. and Mary L. Huff, near Staunton, Va. 

8. Kevin Ralph (195U - . Son of Wendell H. and Marjorie J. Christie, Rochester, N. Y. 

9. King Philip (1910 - 1951) - m. Emma Sarah Pickett (1917 - 

Son of Leslie 0. and Nancy E. Baker. Born in Chelsea, Okla. Radio and electrical- . 
appliance repair business, Artesia, N. M. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army - 
Sgt. Children: Shirley Kay. Widow lives near Peoria, Ariz. 

7. (Gibson Embry) Lambert (cl890 - ? ) - m. (l) Iva Muriel Nipper (cl890 - ; (2) Name 

unknown. Son of Clinton P. and Isola (Zoe) Embry. Probably born in Kansas. 
Lived in Fresno, Calif, at one time; probably died there. Children: (l) Robert 
Lambert; (2) Probably none. 

Larry (also see Lawrence) 

8. Larry Arthur (1937 - m. Mary Ann Heineman (1939 - j 

Son of Arthur R. and Margaret E. Ambrose. Steel-mill foreman, Butler, Pa. Child- ~' 
ren: lynn Ann, John Daniel, Philip Arthur. 

10. Larry Duane (1956 - . Son of Otis S. and Dorothy L. Warren, near Lebanon, Ind. 

10. Larry Paul (196U - . Son of Paul and Eula Gibson, Buena Park, Calif. , 

9. Larry Scott (19U8 - . Son of Edward C. and WiLna Craun, Mt. Solon, Va. 

9. Lawrence Lament (195U - . Son of Richard L. and Joanne L. Fennell, Youngstown,0hio. , 

2U0 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Leland Glen (1922 - 1922). Son of Otto S. and Lula Stad. 

6. Lemuel Austin (cl87U - 1953) - m. Annie E. Deardorf (l875 - 19$8) 

Son of Adam and Eliza Ann Thomas. Born in Latimore Twp., Adams Co., Pa. Farmer, 
near Flora Dale, Aspers, and Bendersville, Pa, (all in Adams Co.). Children: 
Bruce L., Dorothy L. (Rice), Raymond Henry. 

10. Leo Albert (1928 - 19U6). Son of Hobart E. and Sabina P. Reiber. Probably born in 
or near Lebanon, Ind. In U. S. Navy, including World War II; died in service. 

9. Leroy (1937 - Unmarried 

Son of Rene W. and Chleo Snyder. Public-utility employee, Keedysville, Md, 

9. Leroy Wayne (1953 - • Son of Richard L. and Margaret Lewis, McKeesport, Pa. 

8. Leslie Orlando (I89I - m. (l) Nancy Elizabeth Baker (I888 - I963); (?) Josephine 

(cl890 - . Son of Charles H. and Hattie A. Ware. Born in Bardell, Okla. 

Employed in irrigating farmland in Arkansas, Calif., Ariz., and Okla. Now lives in 
Watson, Okla. Veteran of World War I - U. S. Ari^y. Children: (l) King Philip, 
Josephine (Evans-Cummings), Charles Jefferson; (2) None. 

9. Lester Everett (1917 - m. Faye Burnett (1922 - 

Son of (Ora) Clarence and Lillie B. Whitesell. Born in or near Red Key, Ind. 
Printer, Marion, Ind. Children: Janice - adopted (Lines), Everett Lester, Patricia 
Diann. 

9. Lester Paul (192U - Unmarried 

Son of Charles A. and Pauline F, Harshbarger. Teacher, Harrisonburg, Va. (Rocking- 
ham Co.). Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army - Technician. 

5. Levi (I8U2 - 1912) - m. Laura Frances Urich (cl866 - ? ) 

Son of William Bortner (Burtner) and Susannah . Probably a farmer; lived in 

Franklin Twp., York Co., Pa. Children; Mabel P. - adopted (Schultz). He changed 
his name to "Burtner". 

7. (George) Lloyd (1879 - 1956) - m. (l) Minnie Marie Baker (cl880 - ? ); (2) Sara 

(cl890 - . Son of George S. and Jennie C. Durborow. Probably born in 

Ross Twp., Edgar Co., 111. Lived in Decatur, 111. Children: (l) Kenneth Leroy; 
(2) None. Widow lives in Decatur, 111. 

9. Lloyd Orval (1926 - m. Mildred Lucille Warren (1928 - 

Son of Walter S. and Fannie M, Dunnigan. Born in Zionsville, Ind. Masonry con- 
tractor, Lebanon, Ind. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army. Children: David 
Allen, Pamella Diane, Darrell Wayne, Rodney Dean. 

8. Lloyd Wyand (I898 - m. Carrie Huffer (cl900 - 

Son of Osceola W. and Katie Vfyand. Born near Sharpsburg, Md. (Washington Co.). 
Farmer, near Frederick, Md. Children: Carroll Lloyd, Robertlee Huffer, David 
Jacob Wyand, Raymond Richard. 



2ia 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Louis Allen (1917 - m. Freda Marie James (1917 - 

Son of James Paul and Mamie Burch. Born in Rockwall, Tex. Salesman, Wichita, 
Kans. and Oklahoma City, Okla. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Air Corps. No 
children. 

9. Lowell David (19?9 - m. Juanita Ann Nesselrodt (1935 - 

Son of Charles A. and Pauline F. Harshbarger. Born in Harrisonburg, Va. Farmer 
and factory worker, near Keezletown, Va. (Rockingham Co.). Children: William 
Lowell, James Kevin. 

9. Lowell Maurice (1913 - m. Wiletta Nadine Edwards (I9l6 - 

Son of Henry S. and Ethel Overman. Building contractor, Muncie, Ind. Children: 
Janice Lorraine (Groves). 

10. Lowell Wayne (19U3 - 19U3). Son of Walter G. and Eva I Moore, Boone Co., Ind. 

6. Loyal Holmes (I876 - m. Minnie Hermsmeyer (I88I - 1965) 

Son of Herman Jacob and Nancy Welsh. Born in Harrison Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. 
Farmer, Carleton and Litchfield, Nebr.; Spokane, Wash.; and Circle, Mont. Child- 
ren: Olive Bernice, Herman George, Grace Doris (McClurg). 

5. (Martin) Luther (l862 - 1935) - m. Ellen Harvey (I863 - 1925) 

Son of Jacob and Martha Byerly. Farmer in Harrison Twp, (formerly Fawn Twp.), 
Allegheny Co., Pa. Inherited homestead of grandfather, Philip, Children: Floyd, 
Holmes . 



I 



'" 



1 



7. Rev. Luther Olin (1858 - 1910) - m. Jennie Light (cl860 - 19U3) 

Son of Rev. William H. and Perthena F. Paul, Born in Rockingham Co., Va. Minister 
in United Brethren Church in various places in the U. S.; also missionary in Africa 
Last lived near Dayton, Ohio. No children. . 

7. (Clinton) lyle (1893 - 1938) - m. Mamie Lee McCarley (I89U - 

Son of Clinton P. and Isola (Zoe) Embry. Probably born in Kans. Police officer 
in Riverside, Calif. Previously lived in Half Moon Bay, Calif, and San Antonio, 
Tex. Children: Phillippa Wright (Smith-McLean- ? ), (Clinton) Lyle Jr., Fred Wahl. 
Widow married Paul Isaksen and lives in Anchorage, Alaska. 

8. (Clinton) Lyle Jr. (1919 - 1935). Son of (Clinton) I^le and Mamie L. McCarley, 

Riverside, Calif. 

7. Lynn Cochran (1928 - m. Mattie Mae Courson (cl930 - 

Son of Clare S. and Nelle G. Cochran. Born in Grove City, Pa. Engineering super- 
intendent, Witco Chemical Co., Butler, Pa. Children: Holly Carolyn. 

9. Lynn Lockley (1921 - m. Bessie Muirhead (1915 - 

Son of Ezra E. and Pearl Gray. Farmer and school custodian, Dufur, Ore. Veteran 
of World War II - U. S. Array Engineers. Children: Virginia Sllen. 

7. Marion Andrew (1862 - 1929) - m. Hannah Jane Stackhouse (l36U - 1939) 

Son of William 0. and Minerva B. Ennis. Farmer and carpenter, near Broadlands, 111 
Lebanon, Ind. and Redkey, Ind. Children: Estella Mae, Minnie (Moore), Henry Samuel, 
(Ora) Clarence, Nettie Belle (Carder), Earl, Otto Schuyler, Anna Elizabeth (Steiger- 

wait). 

2li2 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEI R FAM ILIES 

8. Marion McKinley (1902 - m. Pribble Maude Given (1899 - 

Son of Homer P. and Anna V. Stover. Born in Mt. Clinton, Va. (Rockingham Co.). 
Supervisor, open-hearth steel furnace, Gary, Ind. Also lived in Crown Point, Ind. 
Now lives near Staunton, Va. Children: Beverly Ann (Lewis), Sherwin Marion, 
Randall Lynnwood. 

10. Mark Edwin (19U9 - . Son of James E. and Billie M. Cheney, Levelland, Tex. 
8. Mark Eugene (1966 - . Son of Robert E. and Dortha L. Hill, Wilmington, Del. 

10. Mark Sanders (1950 - . Son of B. Parrish and Nancy J. Womack, Clarksville, Tex. 

7. Rev. Markwood Monroe (18^8 - 1932) - m. Margaret Benedict Reed (I863 - 19U6) 

Son of Ezra and Louise Keeran. Born near Keezletown, Va. (Rockingham Co.). Also 
lived near Hagerstown, Md. when young. Minister in United Brethren Church in 
various places in Pennsylvania, Washington, and Oregon. Owned and operated fruit 
and nut orchards near Dufur, Ore. Children: Gorman Reed, Nell Keeran (Simpson- 
Riggs), Ezra Emerson, William Reed, John Cole, Katherine Elizabeth (Marvel), Mary, 
Walden Markwood . 

7. Marlyn Hale (I887 - 1893). Son of G. Albert and Anna R. Alter, Freeport, Pa. 

h. Martin (I807 - 1869) - m. Sarah Ernst (I8O8 - 1872) 

Son of Peter Bortner and Elizabeth Wayne. Sometimes known as "Burtner", although 
he retained "Bortner" name. Miller In Latimore Twp., Adams Co., Pa. and Franklin 
Twp., York Co., Pa. Children: Samuel, Elizabeth Ann, John Peter. His daughter, 
and perhaps his youngest son also, changed name to "Burtner". 

6. Martin Henry (I86I - 1927) - m. Lydia M. Knaub (Strickler) (1857 - 1926) 

Son of Elizabeth Ann Burtner, daughter of Martin Bortner. Born in Franklin Twp., 
York Co., Pa. Chain-maker, York, Pa. Children: James Andrew, Martin Henry Jr., 
Martha ^tin^, Evelyn A. 

7. Martin Henry (Harry) (I88U - I938) - m. Mary Charlotte Evans (1892 - 1931;) 

Son of Martin H. and I^ydia M. Knaub (Strickler). Born in or near Franklintown, Pa. 
(York Co.). Machinist, York, Pa. Children; Glenn Franklin, Dolores Elizabeth 
(Lease), Carl. 

6. Martin Herman (1885 - 1958) - m. Minnie Haller (cl890 - 

Son of Herman Jacob and Nancy Welsh. Born in Jefferson Twp., Butler Co., Pa. 
Farmer, baker and hardware dealer, Carleton, Ansley, and Litchfield, Nebr. No 
children. Widow lives in Litchfield, Nebr. 

11. Matthew (I96U - . Son of Bruce R. and Helen L. Opitz, Niles, 111. 

6. Merrill George (1886 - 19U7) - m. (1) Linda Patterson (cl890 - ; (2) Florence May 
Parker (1901 - . Son of John N. and Eliza Belle Logan. Farmer, butcher, cook, 
and sawyer in Jefferson Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Also in U. S. Army for ten years, 
including World War I. Children: (l) None; (2) Roy Lester, Mary Belle (McLaughlin), 
Margaret Ann (Benninger), George Konrad, Helen Estella (Frenchak), Eva Jean (Ohl), 
Nancy Lee (Mowery), James Richard. Widow lives near Butler, Pa. 

2h3 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURINER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 
10. Michael David (1956 - . Son of Rene L. Jr. and Helen Richter, Charlotte, N, C. 

10. Michael Edward (19U8 - . Son of Clifford E. and Anna M. Rothermel, Chicago, 111. 

11. Michael Joseph (1965 - . Son of Howard N. and Patricia L. Huntley, Danville, Ind. 

9. Michael Kenneth (1959 - » Son of Kenneth E. and Pauline P. Smith, Streamwood, 111. 

10. Michael Lee (1958 - . Son of Carroll L. and Mary A. Cashour, near Frederick, Md, ' 
10. Michael Paul (195U - . Son of George S. and Patricia A. Butts, Clear Springs, Md. , 

7. Millard Fillmore (l859 - 1862). Son of Jacob L. and Malinda Hackett, Douglas Co,, 111. 

6. Milton Dickison (i860 - 19U6) - m. (l) Margaret M. Rice (1863 - 1908); (2) Minnie M. | 

Zeigler (cl868 - 19U7). Son of Samuel and Catharine May. Farmer in East Penns- i 
borough Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. Children: (l) Bessie Ethel (Quigley), Edward ' 
William; (2) None. j 

8. Neal Arthur (I9h8 - . Son of Neal R. and Esther M, Cook, near Pottstown, Pa. 

7. Neal Richard (1919 - m. Esther Marie Cook (1923 - 

Son of Forest H. and Mary L. Giles. Born near Butler, Pa. Teacher of Agriculture, 
Butler, Pa. and Pottstown, Pa. Lives near Pottstown. Veteran of World War II - 
U. S. Arny - Tech. Sgt. Children: Neal Arthur, Eileen Ruth. 

7. Rev. Newton Weldon (l862 - 1933) - m. Ella Mae Albert (1865 - 1956) 

Son of Rev. William H. and Perthena F. Paul. Born in Mt. Clinton, Va. (HDckingham 
Co.). Minister in United Brethren Church in Baltimore, Md.; Johnstown, Scottdale, 
Punxatawney, and Huntingdon, Pa>; Harrisburg, Pa. and Canal Winchester^ Ohio. 
Children: Albert Weldon, Virginia Marie (Kefauver-Stevens-Otstot), Sheldon Kephart, 
William Thomas . ' 

8. Noah Wyand (l899 - m. Daisy Marker (1906 - 

Son of Osceola W, and Katie Wyand. Born near Sharpsburg, ^k3. (Washington Co.). 
Owns and operates a slaughter-house near Middletown, Md. (Washington Co.). Childreni 
Velma (Sheppard), Sylvia (Wonner), Cecil Hoy. 

7. Norman Philip (I876 - 19U3) Unmarried 

Son of John E. and Susan B. Criswell. Born in Etna, Pa. (Allegheny Co.). Laborer 
in and near Butler, Pa. 

8. Oliver Leo (1926 - m. Mary Catherine Ceilings (cl930 - 

Son of Wilbur L. and Cecilia Hiwiller. Electrician, Marwood, Pa. (Butler Co.). 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Navy, Children: Charles Patrick. 

7. Oren Llewellyn (lB75 - 19U6) - m. Annie Bowman Spitzer (I878 - 1962) 

Son of Rev. William H. and Perthena F. Paul. Bom near Mt. Clinton, Va. (Rocking-, 
ham Co.). Business-man and farmer, Hinton, Va. (Rockingham Co.). Children: Helen 
Esther, Oren Llewellyn Jr. - 

8. Oren Llewellyn Jr. (cl913 - cl92l). Son of Oren L. and Annie B. Spitzer, Hinton, Va.'' 

2Uk 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNBR MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

10. Or land (I9li2 - . Adopted son of Clarence L. and Ada M. Owens, in or near Marion, Ind. 

11. Orval Raygene (1957 - * Son of Delmar R. and Betty M. Strawmyer, Noblesville, Ind. 

9. Orville Leslie (1911 - m. Mildred Nadine Davidson (Burtner )Cl917 - 

Son of Snowden 0. and Sarah J. Lee. Born in Kansas City, Kans . Estimating engin- 
eer, Ft. Worth, Tex.; Buffalo, N. Y.; and Kansas City, Kans. Veteran of World War 
II - U. S. Army Engineers - Tech. Sgt. Married first wife of brother. Dale K. 
Children: Leslie Ann. 

7. Osceola Winfield (l86U - 19^1) - m. (1) Katie Wyand (I869 - 1906); (2) Cora Poffen- 

berger (Snyder) (1865 - 1937); (3) Emma Flook (Nunamaker) (1873 - 19U5). Son of 
Ezra and Sarah E. Harp. Farmer, near Sharpsburg, Md, (Washington Co.). Children: 
(1) Howard Wyand, Samuel Joshua Wyand, Lloyd Wyand, Noah Wyand, Rene Wyand, Mary 
Vfyand (Young); (2) and (3) None. 

9. Otis Sanford (1928 - m. Dorothy Louise Warren (1925 - 

Son of VJalter S. and Fannie M. Dunnigan. Bom in Eagle Village, Ind. Contractor, 
Lebanon, Ind. Children: Connie Sue, Ronnie Lee, Brenda Darlene, Larry Duane, 
Jeanette Arleen, Stephen Allen. 

9. Otto Orville (1901 - m. Zella Mae Garrett (1900 - 

Son of Walter S. and Mary A. Rolison. Born in Illinois. Lives in Winamac, Ind. 
Children: Arnold Andrew. 

8. Otto Schuyler (I896 - 1958) - m. (l) Lula Stad (cl396 - 1930); (2) M. Adeline Boyce 

(cl900 - ; (3) Jane Knowles (Westfall) (1912 - . Son of Marion A. and Hannah J. 
Stackhouse. Born in Broadlands, 111. (Champaign Co.); also lived in and near Leban- 
on, Ind. when young. Auditor, public-utility holding company, Mt. Vernon, Newark, 
and Coshocton, Ohio and Pasadena, Calif. Veteran of World War I - U. S. Arnry - 
Sgt. Children; (l) Leland Glen, Marilyn (Huminel); (2) Patricia Ann (Milla); (3) 
Gary Stephen. Widow lives in Pasadena, Calif. 

7. Dr. Otto Whitmore (1873 - 1951) - m. Ethel Bookwalter (l875 - 1963) 

Son of Rev. William H.' and Perthena F. Paul. Born in Mt. Clinton, Va, (Rocking- 
ham Co.). Minister in Congregational Church, in Ansonia, Conn, for 37 years. 
Retired in Hamden, Conn. Children: Ruth Bookwalter (Jacoby), (Otto) Whitmore, 
(Mary) Louise (Laird). 

6. Owen Alexander (cl86l - cl936) - m. Mary (May) Bell Larder (cl86l - ? ) 

Son of Reuben and Mary J. Neidig. Probably born in Muscatine, Iowa. Lived in 

Kansas, New York City, Pittsburgh, and Pomona, Calif. Photographer. Children: 
William Larder. 

9. (Benjamin) Parrish (I916 - m. Nancy Joe Womack (1926 - 

Son of Horace A. and El worth I. Parrish. Born in Rockwall, Tex. Civil engineer, 
Tex. Highway Dept. , Roxton, Cooper, Paris, Sulphur Springs, and Clarksville, Tex. 
Veteran of VJorld War II - U. S. Navy - Cmdr. Children: Mark Sanders, John Allen, 
Rebecca Lynn, Mary Jane. 

10. Patrick Thomas (1959 - . Son of Clifford E. and Anna M. Hothermel, Chicago, 111. 

2U5 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MI£S AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. (Winton) Paul (1395 - 1918). Son of William H. and Margaret J. Huffman. Born in 

Harrisonburg, Va. (Rockingham Co.). In U. S. Marines in World War I - - died in 
Battle of Belleau Wood. 

9. Paul (1921 - m. Eula Gibson (1929 - 

Son of James Paul and Mamie Burch. Boin in Rockwall, Tex. En?)loyed in Gulf Oil 
Refinery, Santa Fe Springs, Calif. Lives in Buena Park, Calif. Veteran of World 
War II - U. S. Army - Sgt. In U. S. Air Force for four years after war. Children: 
Susan Lee, Bobbie Dale, Larry Paul, Jerry Lynn. 

9. Paul (1961 - . Son of Harry (Henry) 0. and Evelyn Cerkvenik, Staten Island, N. Y. 
7. Paul Alter (1892 - 1892). Son of G. Albert and Anna R. Alter, Freeport, Pa. 

7. Paul Atlee (1920 - m. (l) Marjorie M. Bedwell (cl920 - ; (2) Edith Lucille 

Voorhees (1917 - . Son of Clare S. and Nelle G. Cochran. Raised near Butler, Pa.. 
Superintendent of mails, Westminster, Calif. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Navy 
Children: (l) Paulette Ann, Edward Paul, Patrice Clarelee (Eaves), Gladys Katherine 

9. Paul Daniel (l9i;2 - 1967) Unmarried 

Son of Clair P. Jr. and Margaret L. Burt. Bom in Peekskill, N. Y. In U. S. Air 
Force - 2nd Lt. 

8. Paul Eugene (19U0 - m. Donna Boyer (I9li3 - 

Son of Paul S. and Jean P. Kuhn. Probably born in Dillsburg, Pa. (York Co.). 
In U. S. Anny - Sgt.; presently in Viet Nam. Children: John Preston. 

10. Paul Rees (19U2 - m. Judith Ann Carpenter (19U1 - 

Son of Robert R. and Mary Sanford. Born in Evanston, 111. Certified aircraft 
welder, Milwaukee, Wise; Tulsa, Okla.; and Chicago, 111. No children. 

7. Paul Sr^ser (1912 - ra. (l) (Bertha) Rose Saphore (1911 - ; (2) Jean Pauline Kuhn 
(192U - . Son of John W. and Susan Smyser. Born in Dillsburg, Pa. (York Co.). 
Service-station attendant, Mechanicsburg, Pa. (Cumberland Co.). Veteran of World 
War II - U. So Army. Children: (1) William Lavern, Patricia Jean (Snyder); (2) 
Paul Eugene, John William, Walter Preston. 

h. Peter (1799 - 1888) - m. (l) Susanna Ernst (1798 - 1358); (2) Minnie A. (cl798- 

- cl875). Son of Peter Bortner and Elizabeth Wayne. Born in Codorus Twp., York 
Co., Pa. Cooper in Franklin Twp., York Co., Pa, Changed his name to "Burtner". 
Children: (l) Adam, Peter Jr., Susan; (2) None. 

5. Peter (cl8l8 - cl887) - m. Helen (Dennis ? ) (cl826 - cl870) 

Son of Philip Bortner and Ellen Gallagher. Born in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa. 
Changed his name to "Burtner". Carpenter and builder, Cincinnati, Ohio. Children: 
William H., Joseph D., Charles F., Philip E. 



^' 



5. Peter (1333 - 1908) - m. Henrietta (Hetty) (l837 - 1918) 

Son of Peter and Susanna Ernst. Laborer, Franklin Twp., York Co., Pa. Children: 
Minnie A., Anna. 

2U6 



PART C - R EGISTE R 0?^ BORTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMI LIES 

3. Philip (1767 - 181^8) - m. Margaret Negley (1776 - 18^7) 

Son of Philip Bortner and Maria Elisabetha Velt. Born in Bethel Twp., Berks Co., 
Pa. Sometimes called "Burtner", but there is no evidence that he changed his name. 
Farmer and miller on Little Bull Creek in Deer Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. (part sub- 
sequently in East Deer Twp.; then in Fawn Twp.; and now in Harrison Twp.). Child- 
ren: Mary, George, Elizabeth (Drane), Barbara (Smith), Philip, fiargaret (Murdock), 
Jacob, Sarah, Martha (Varner), John. Children changed name to "Burtner". 

h. Philip (cl79U - 1827) - m. Ellen (Elenora) Gallagher (cl800 - ? ) 

Son of John Bortner (Burtner) and Christina Einerich. Probably born in Pine Grove 
Twp., Berks Co., Pa. Farmer in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Veteran of Var of 
181? (Pennsylvania militia). Sometimes called "Burtner", although he did not adopt 
that name - - he signed his name "Bourdner". Children: John, Peter, Philip, 
William, Veronica (Fannie-Hazlett). Surviving children changed name to "Burtner". 

U. Philip (1809 - I8U6) - m. Elizabeth Murdock (cl8lU - ? ) 

Son of Philip Bortner (Burtner) and Margaret Negley. Probably changed his name to 
"Burtner". Farmer in East Deer Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. Children: Margaret Ellen 
(Porter), Sarah Elizabeth (Schwerdering), Jefferson. Son changed his name to 
"Burtner". Widow married James Wright and lived in Butler Co., Pa. 

5. Philip (1820 - 1912) - m. Rebecca Shobert (l825 - 1907) 

Son of Philip Bortner (Bourdner-Burtner) and Ellen Gallagher. Changed name to 
"Burtner". Boatman and boat-captain on Pennsylvania Canal in early life; lived in 
Freeport, Pa. Later, farmer, carpenter, and peddler in Jefferson Twp., Butler Co., 
Pa. Children: (William) Henry Harrison, John Edward, Mary (Gamble), (Catherine) 
Helen (Wilsey), Henrietta A. (Nettie-Smith), Eliza N. (Lydia-Richey), Rebecca 
(Balph), Fannie (Keasey), Annie, Edward. 

8. Philip (1913 - 1918). Son of William and Delta F. Price, Pegs, Okla. 

9. Philip Arthur (l96h - . Son of Larry A. and Mary A. Heineman, Butler, Pa. 

5. Philip Augustus (cl859 - cl859). Son of Jacob and Martha Byerly, Allegheny Co., Pa, 

6. Philip E. (i860 - 186_). Son of Peter and Helen (Dennis ?), Cincinnati, Ohio. 

8. Philip Henry (cl895 - m. (l) Nora Mae McCullough (I89O - I96I); (2) Osie Verona 
Moore (189O - . Son of Charles H. and Hattie A. Ware. Born in Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cattle rancher, Bardell and Chelsea, Okla. and Toledo, Ore. Children: Kathleen 
Mille (McCombs), Phyllis Mae (Barron), Eugene Philip; (2) None. 

6. Philip S. (cl86U - cl885). Son of William and Eliza S. Hesselgesser, Butler Co., Pa. 

7. Philip Wilson (1905 - m„ Name unknown 

Son of Alfred T. and Foss Wilson. Born in Harrisburg, Pa. Stamp-dealer, Reading, 
Pa. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army - No children. 

8. "Randall Lynnwood (1939 - Unmarried 

Son of Marion M. and Pribble M. Given. Born in Gary, Ind. Farmer, near Staunton, Va. 

10. Randy Dean (196U - . Son of Jackie L. and Freda M. Colet (Hiriton),Thorntown,Ind. 

2U7 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MLES AND THEIR FMILIES 
Ray (also see Raymond, Roy) 

9. Ray Everett (1910 - m. Irene Marthella Lowe (1911 - "' 

Son of Walter S. and Mary Alice Rolison. Born in Custer Co., Okla. Farmer, near 
Lebanon, Ind. No children. 

7. (James) Raymond (I9lh - 1930). Son of Albert G. and Joanna Creighton, Ardara, Pa. 

8. Raymond Calvin (19^1 - • Son of Calvin R. Jr. and Ella Wagner, Indianapolis, Ind. J 

7. Raymond Dorsey (1909 - 1962) - m. Maryann Seaman (I9l5 - '' 

Son of Dorsey P. and Florence Norris. Probably born in Beaver, Pa. Supervisor, 
Bell Telephone Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. Children: Raymond Dorsey, Carl Drev. Widov I 
lives in Pittsburgh. , 

8. Raymond Dorsey Jr. (19U0 - ra. Lynn Templeton {I9h2 - j 

Son of Raymond D. and Maryann Seaman. Born in Pittsburgh, Pa. Industrial-relations' 
work, Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corp., Silver Spring, N. Y. Children: Raymond DorseylH! 

9. Raymond Dorsey III (1965 - . Son of Raymond D. Jr. and Lynn Templeton. 

7. Raymond Henry (I9l5 - m. Janet Flora Delp (1912 - 

Son of Lemuel A. and Annie E. Deardorf. Born in Flora Dale, Pa, (Adams Co.). Em- 
ployed in Administrative Office, U. S. Government, Carlisle, Pa. (Cumberland Co.).<^ 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Arny - Sgt. Children: Ann Camille. 

7. Raymond Irwin (I89O - m. Elva Estelle Hemphill (1892 - 

Son of Henry G. and Delia Irwin. Born in Tarentum, Pa. (Allegheny Co,). Checker, 
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Duquesne, Sarver, Birdville, and Worthington, Pa. 
Children: Raymond Orland, Marion Elizabeth (Messmer-Grey), Richard Le Roy, Donald 
Paul, Georganna (Craig), Kenneth William. 

7. Raymond M. (1882 - 1892). Son of Frederick G. and Mary A. Enck, Cumberland Co., Pa. <, 

8. Raymond Orland (1913 - 1962) - m. Martha Edith Johnson (1913 - .* 

Son of Raymond I. and Elva E. Hemphill. Born in Duqesne, Pa. (Allegheny Co.). 
Draftsman-designer, Tarentum and Natrona Heights, Pa. (Allegheny Co.). Children; ^ 
Betty Lou (Rebhun). Widow lives in Natrona Heights, Pa. 

10. Raymond Paul (1931 - m. Margaret Sue Andrews (cl931 - 

Son of Homer L. and Lucille Paul. Bom in Ardmore, Okla. Manager of Swift Hotel 
unit, Springfield, Mo. Children: Bobby Ray, James David. ' 

9. Raymond Richard (1937 - m. Ollie Lee McVey (1937 - 

Son of Lloyd W. and Carrie Huffer. Farmer, near Frederick, Md. Children: Chris- 
tina Lee, Reginald Scott, Kelly Renee. , 

7. Raymond William (I89U - m. Carrie E, Heffner (I89O - ? ) 

Son of Frank (Franklin) C. and Elmerta M. Nelson. Originally named "William Hay- 
mond". Born in Franklin Twp., York Co., Pa. Butcher, Mechanicsburg, Pa.; Harrisburg/ 
Steelton, and Middletown, Pa. Children; Pauline (Boyer). 



2U8 



>j' 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MAIES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

10. Reginald Scott (I963 - . Son of Raymond R. and Ollie L. McVey, near Frederick, Md. 

8. Rene de Carte (I886 - 1937) - m. Margaret Rees (cl886 - 19^9) 

Son of Cornelius Albertus (Albert) and Clara E. Light. Bom in Annville, Pa. 
Physical director in Y. M. C. A., Salt Lake City, Utah and Chicago, 111. Later, 
sales manager, Chicago, 111. Lived in Wilmette, 111. Children: (Florence) 
Elizabeth (Hinkley), Robert Rees. 

8. Rene Leroy (1893 - 1963) - m. Lellie Hooks (I898 - 

Son of David H. and Emjna Spalter. Born in Charlotte, N. C. Einployed in father's 
furniture store in Greensboro, N. C. Also lived in Washington, D. C. Children: 
Rene Leroy. Widow lives in Washington, D. C. 

9. Rene Leroy Jr. (1922 - m. Helen Richter (cl925 - 

Son of Rene L. and Lellie Hooks. Born in Greensboro, N. C. Manager of Admin, and 
Personnel, Eastern Airlines, Charlotte, N. C. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Air 
Corps - Capt. Children: Jenifer Lee, (Louis) Bradley, Michael David, Rene Leroy III. 

10. Rene Leroy III (1956 - • Son of Rene L, and Helen Richter, Charlotte, N. C. 

8. Rene Vfyand (1901 - m. Chleo Snyder (I90I4 - 

Son of Osceola W. and Katie Wyand. Born near Sharpsburg, Md. Farmer, near Sharps- 
burg, Md. (Washington Co.). Supt. of Salem Evangelical United Brethren Church 
School, Keedysville, Md. Children: Leroy. 

5. Reuben (cl8?6 - cl910) - m. Mary J. Neidig (l83h - 1893) 

Son of Samuel and Elizabeth Fought. Born in East Pennsborough Twp. (nov in Silver 
Spring Twp.), Cumberland Co., Pa. Laborer, farmer, salesman, and coal dealer. 
Muscatine, Iowa; Nebraska; Empire Twp., Ellsworth Co., Kans.; Pomona, Kans.; East 
Chicago, 111.; and Kansas City, Kans. Children: Ida Mabel (Millett), Artamesta 
(Mistie), Owen Alexander, Clinton Percy, Gertrude Sue (Benton), Bessie Lulu 
(Merriam), Eugene Millett. 

9. Richard Alan (I9l4h - m. Jo Ann Ruggier (l9ll - 

Son of Richard L. and Pearl Crim. Laborer, McKeesport and Lowber, Pa, Children: 
Shawn James, Ross Alan, Coral Lee. 

10. Richard Eugene (19U3 - Unmarried 

Son of Clifford E. and Anna M. Rothermel. Laboratoiy technician, Chicago, 111. 

10. Richard Eugene (1950 - . Son of Eugene P. and Billye R. Reese, Ft. Worth, Tex. 

7. Richard H. (l875 - cl875). Son of George P. and Elizabeth Eakle, Keezletown, Va. 

8. Richard Henry (I893 - 1893). Son of George C. and Izora F. Clatterbuck, Rockingham 

Co., Va. 

7. Richard Hugh (1919 - m. Fern Esther Fromm (1919 - 

Son of Alfred T. and Foss Wilson. Born in Harrisburg, Pa. Bookkeeper, South 
Temple, Pa. (Berks Co.). Veteran of World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Corp. 
Children: Laraine Kay, Scott Frederick. 

2li9 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Richard Lament (1933 - m- Joanne Louise Fennell (1931 - 

Son of Clarence R. and Gertrude Wilderson. Machine operator - General Fireproofinp 

Co., Youngstovn, Ohio. Children: Lawrence Lamont, Timotl^ Allen, Todd Raymond, 
Daniel Clark. 

8. Richard Lee (1919 - m. Marjorie Frances Patrick (1920 - 

Son of William and Delia F. Price. Born in Pegs, Okla. (Cherokee Co.). Also lived 1 
in Durango, Colo, when young. Electrical engineer, Lafayette, Ind.; Princeton, N.c 
Lancaster, Pa.; and Akron and Canton, Ohio. With Goodyear Aircraft Corp. Children: 
Gregory Lee, Debra Lee (both adopted). 



10. Richard Lee (1956 - . Son of William H. and Suzanne C, Hetzel, Bethesda, Md. 

8. Richard Leroy (1920 - m. (1) Pearl Crim (1921 - ; (2) Margaret Lewis (1921 - 

Son of Raymond I. and Elva E. Hemphill. Born in Natrona Heights, Pa. (Allegheny 
Co.). Metalurgical-test machinist, McKeesport, Pa. Also lived in Sarver, Pa. 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: (l) Phyllis Lee (Bulischeck), 
Richard Alan; (2) Leroy Wayne. 

9. Richard Logan (1926 - m, (l) Rosella Thorpe (cl926 - ; (2) Katherine Bostic 

(cl930 - . Son of Samuel L, and Merla A. Walker. Born in Terra Haute, Ind. 
Factory employee, Bloomington, Ind. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army. Child- 
ren: (l) Brenda Rose, Samuel Richard; (2) None. 



II 



9. Richard Stanley (1955 - . Son of John P. and Mary Fasulo, Staten Island, N. Y. 
8. Robert Albert (1950 - . Son of George N. and Annabelle Creighton, Larimer, Pa. 
8. Robert Calvin (19U8 - . Son of Calvin R. Jr. and Ella Wagner, Indianapolis, Ind. 

10. Robert Cecil (i960 - . Son of Jackie L. and Freda M. Colet (Hiriton), Thomtown,In<J 

7. Robert Clare (1915 - m. Velma Marie Calvert (1920 - \ 

Son of Clare S. and Nelle G, Cochran. Born in Butler, Pa. Ovms and operates a 
refrigeration sales and service business, Ashville, Ohio. Also lived in Canton anc|r 
Millfield, Ohio. Children (both adopted): Lois Marie (Hollis); Patricia Claire(Rus^i 

7. Robert Daniel (1886 - 1962) - m. Christine Elizabeth Moore (1885 - 

Son of George S. and Rosa Weismiller. Born in Muscatine, Iowa. Foreman of elect--' 
ric-line dept.. Board of Water and Light, Lansing, Mich. Veteran of World War I - 
U. S. Army. No children. Widow lives in Lansing, Mich. 



9. Robert Earl (Jack) (1919 - m. Jane L. Robards (1921 - 

Son of James Paul and Mamie Burch. Born in Rockwall, Tex. High School teacher and 
coach, San Jose and Wasco, Calif. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Sgt 
Children: Jon Patrick, Ted Robert. 

9. Robert Edwin (19U5 - m. Barbara Lange (19U5 - 

Adopted son of Dr. E. Edwin and Bonita Sngle. Plant stockkeeper, Dayton, Ohio. 
Children: Robert Edwin Jr. 

10. Robert Edwin Jr. (1965 - . Son of Robert E. and Barbara Lange, Dayton, Ohio. 

250 



\ 



PART C - REGISTER QF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. Robert Eugene (1936 - m. Dortha Lyrm Hill {I9h0 - 

Son of Calvin R. and Olive S. Smith. Born in Mechanicsburg, Pa. (Cumberland Co.). 
Research engineer. Sun Oil Co., Wilmington, Del. Children: Andrew Wayne, Mark Eugene. 

8. Robert Forest (1950 - . Son of Wendell H. and Marjorie J. Christie, Rochester, N. Y. 

8. Robert Fouts (l89U - m. Esther M. Passmore (I896 - 

Son of William L. and Emma Fouts. Born in West Alexandria, Ohio (Preble Coo). 
Assembler, National Cash Register Co., Dayton, Ohio. Veteran of World War I - U. S. 
Army - Cavalry. Children: Robert Kenneth, Jean Isabel (Eichel). 

7. Rbbert Grenville (1899 - 1900). Son of Frank (Franklin) C. and Elmerta M. Nelson, 

York Co., Pa, 

8. Robert Jay (19U? - m. Beverly Ray Strickland (I9h6 - 

Son of Emerson E. and Ethel L. Yingling. Bom in Butler Co., Pa,; also lived in 
St. Petersburg, Fla. In U. S. Air Force - presently Lieut.; stationed in Va. Lives 
in Hampton, Va, Children: Susan Ray. 

9. Robert Kenneth (1927 - m. (l) Mona J. Leadinghouse (1927 - ; (2) Barbara K. Sennett 

(1931 - . Son of Robert F, and Esther M. Passmore. Born in Dayton, Ohio. Market- 
ing and sales work, Dayton, Ohio and Los Angeles, Calif. Lives in Torrance, Calif. 
Veteran of World War II- U. S. Navy. Children: (l) Kenneth Robert, Kathleen J.; (2) 
William Anton. 

8. Robert Lambert (1910 - m. Nola Mae Owens (1912 - 

Son of G. E. Lambert and Iva M. Nipper. Born in San Antonio, Tex. Sales and dis- 
tribution of automotive replacement parts, Portland, Ore. Also lived in Dallas 
and Houston, Tex.; New Orleans, La.; Fresno, Calif.; and Olympia, Wash. Veteran 
of World War II - U. S. Arnr^ - Capt. Children: Iva Mae (Hope). 

9. Robert Lawrence (1951 - . Son of Charles W. and Shirley J. Clark, San Diego, Calif. 

9. Robert Lee Huffer (1927 - m. Faye L. Troupe (1928 - 

Son of Lloyd W. and Carrie Huffer. Custom fanner, near Frederick, Md. Children: 
Patricia Ann, Ronnie Lee, Steven Jay. 

10. Robert Marvin (1939 - m. Linda Lee Gerben (cl9U0 - 

Son of Williard M. and Bessie Parmer. Last known to be living in Muncie, Ind. 
Children: Mary Lou (perhaps others). 

7. Robert Melvin (I908 - 1908). Son of Albert G. and Joanna Creighton, Duquesne, Pa. 

7. Robert Rauch (1900 - m. (l) Barbara Eva Gruber (1900 - ; (2) Kathryn Forbes 

(Kitchen) (1902 - . Son of Rev. Edward 0. and Helen Rauch. Born in Hummelstown, 
Pa. Life insurance underwriter, Harrisburg, Pa. Onetime County Agent, Dauphin 
Co., Pa. Children: (l) Barbara Ann (Elfreth), Robert Rauch Jr; (2) None. 

8. Robert Rauch Jr. (1929 - m. (l) (Kathryn) Gloria Moore (1927 - ; (2) Thelma Mae 

Killinger (1927 - . Son of Robert R. and Barbara Eva Gruber. Born in Harrisburg, 
Pa. District sales engineer, Framingham, Mass. and Chamblee, Ga. Korean War 
veteran - U. S. Marines. Children: (l) Melissa M.; (2) Steven Craig. 

251 



I 

■i 

I 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Robert Rees (1909 - m. Mary Sanford (1909 - 

Son of Hene de Carte and Margaret Rees. Born in Chicago, 111. Research chemist, . 
Wilmette and Skokie, 111. Children: Bruce Robert, Paul Rees. A 

7. Robert Sylvester (1901 - 1963) - m. Dorotty Mitchell (I90lj - 

Son of Charles W. and Anna Cadwallader. Born in Duquesne, Pa. Steel-mill employee; 
Youngstovm, Ohio. Children: Charles VJilliam, Donna Jean (Dean). 

9. Rev. Robert Wallace (19?U - m. Cleo Belle Wakefield (19?U - 

Son of John Co and Martha Hawley. Born in Corvallis, Ore. Methodist minister, 
Eugene, Salem, and Portland, Ore. Presently minister of Rose City Park I'lethodist 
Church, Portland. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: David Kirk, 
Shelley Lyn. 

8. Robert William (1921 - m. Betty Jane Nicholson (1923 - 

Son of Jesse H. and Marie W. Armbruster. Born in Petaluma, Calif. Flight inspectoi 
Federal Aviation Agency, Fremont, Calif. In U. S. Air Force, including World War I] 
- lU years - Capt. Also lived in Fresno, Sacramento, Calif.; Laredo and Lubbock, 
Tex.; Rosewell, N. M. ; Greenville, S. C. Children: Bonnie, Belinda. 

10. Rodney Dean (1966 - . Son of Lloyd 0. and Mildred L. V;arren, Lebanon, Ind. 

9. Rev. Roger Ellsworth (1926 - m. Sylvia Creager (1933 - 

Son of Howard W. and Louise Miller. Born near Keedysville, Md. (Washington Co.). T] 
Minister and missionary - Evangelical United Brethren Church - York, Pa., West 
Elkton, Ohio. Presently returned for a second time to Nigeria. Veteran of World 
War II - U. S. Navy. Children: Rebecca Sue, Timothy Edwin, (John) Templeton, 
Margaret Louise, Christopher Mark, James Steven. 

9. Roger Frank (1952 - . Son of Edwin R. Jr. and Madeline J. Chapman, Lockbourne AFB. 

8. Roger Lee (1936 - m. Carol Ann Spitzer (1936 - ^ I 

Son of Bruce L. and Bernetta V. Quigle. Born in Hershey, Pa. Research geologist, 
Standard Oil of Calif., Los Angeles, Calif. Lives in Anaheim, Calif. No children. 

9. Roger Leroy (1939 - m. Ardyth Ellen Wilson (19U2 - 

Son of Kenneth Lo and Gwendolyn L. Watkins. Auto sales representative, Decatur, 
111. No children. 

7. Rev. Roger Quentin (I9l8 - m. Jane I-larie Kustanbauder (Dworsak) (1926 - 

Son of Forest H. and I'lary L. Giles. Born near Butler, Pa. Methodist minister, 
Morris, North Bend, Orangeville, Bald Eagle, Tyrone, Reedsville, and Millville, Pa. 
Also Chaplain in U. S. Air Force for five years. Children: Christine Jane. 

8. Ronald Cecil (19U3 - m. Linda Sue Brown (19U5 - 

Son of Cecil F. and Pearl L. Bachman. Bom in Butler, Pa. Supervisor of costs and 
pricing, RCA -Whirlpool Corp., La Porte, Ind. Children: Karla Sue. 

10. Ronnie Lee (19U7 - . Son of Otis S. and Dorotl^ L. Warren, near Lebanon, Ind. 
10. Ronnie Lee (1957 - . Son of Robert L. H. and Faye L. Troupe, near Frederick, Md. 

252 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

8. Roscoe Homer (I9l6 - m. (Thelma) Elizabeth Abbott (l9lU - 

Son of Homer P. and Anna V. Stover. Born in Mt. Solon, Va. (Rockingham Co.). 
Poultry extension specialist, Blacksburg, Va. Also lived in Salem, Va. Children: 
Frederick Homer, Glen William. 

9. Ross Alan (1965 - . Son of Richard A. and Jo Ann Rugier, Lowber, Pa. 
Roy (also see Ray) 

7. Roy Ezra (l886 - I960) - m. Myrtle Jones (cl900 - 

Son of Ezra and Sarah E. Harp. Born near Keedysville, Md. (Washington Co.). 
Farmer, near Keedysville, Md. in early life; later, employed in retail furniture 
store of his brother, David H. , in Greensboro, N. C. No children. Widow lives in 
Greensboro, N. C. 

8. Roy Huffman (I89O - 1959) - m. (Florence) Mary Adams (l895 - 196h) 

Son of William H. Jr. and Martha J. Huffman. Born in Harrisonburg, Va. (Rocking- 
ham Co.). Special clerk - Post Office Department, Washington, D. C. Veteran of 
World War I - U. S. Army. Children: Roy Hoffman, Carroll Elmer. 

9. Roy Hoffman Jr. (1920 - m. Helen Jacquier (192U - 

Son of Roy H. and F. Mary Adams. Parisitologist, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Navy. Children: Helen Collette, 
Roy Hoffman III. 

10. Roy Hoffman III (19^0 - . Son of Roy H. Jr. and Helen Jacquier, Louisville, I^. 

6. Roy Irving (l877 - m. Ellie Dougan (I878 - I963) 

Son of Isaac C. and Amanda J. Singer. Born in Harrison Twp., Allegheny Co., Pa. 
Oil gauger, farmer, auto mechanic, and machinist, in and near Butler, Pa. Veteran 
of Spanish-American War - l^th Reg,, Pa. Natl. Guard. No children. 

7. ftjy Lester (1922 - m. Mary B. McLaughlin (1922 - 

Son of Merrill G. and Florence M. Parker. Steel-mill worker, Butler, Pa. Veteran 
of World War II - U. S. Army - Corp. Children: Debbie Elaine, Linda Ruth, Gregory 
Roy. 

7. Roy liynn (I9l8 - m. Florence Duffy (I9l8 - 

Son of David N. and Nellie Shook. Born in Natrona Heights, Pa. (Allegheny Co.). 
Inspector, Ford Co. Stamping Div., Walton Hills, Ohio. Lives near Streetsboro, 0. 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Arny Combat Engineers - Tech. Sgt. Children; Sandra. 

7. Russel Stanley (1927 - m. Freda Mae Holsapfel (1933 - 

Son of Forest H. and Mary L. Giles. Born in Butler, Pa. Home-remodeling contract- 
or, Greenville, Pa. (Mercer Co.). Children: Jeffrey Russel, Diane Linn. 

h. Samuel (1782 - 1856) - m, Elizabeth Fought (Focht) (1790 - 185?) 

Son of Jacob Bortner and Eva . Apparently originally named "Simon". Changed 

his name to "Samuel Burtner". JBom in Warwick Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa, Farmer in 
East Pennsborough Twp. (part later in Silver Spring Twp.). Cumberland Co., Pa. 
Children: Catharine (Swartz), Rachel (Ebright), Sophia (?) (Ebright), John, KLisa- 
beth (Bowers), Samuel, Reuben, Daniel. 

253 



PART C - REGISTE R OF BURTNER M ALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

5. Samuel (l805/l0 - 182_). Son of George Bortner (Burtner) and (Margaret Elizabeth ?• 
Catharine Hoke. Born in East Pennsborough Twp. or West Pennsborough Twp., Cumber- 
land Coo, Pa. Probably died in Dickinson Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. or in Dayton 
Twp., Montgonery Co., Ohio, where his father's family moved in 1328. 

5. Samuel Jr. (cl82U - 1891) - m. Catharine May (l827 - I896) j 

Son of Samuel and Elizabeth Fought. Farmer in Silver Spring and East Pennsborough ♦ 
Twps., Cumberland Co., Pa. Children: Ida May (Lowery), Milton Dickison, Daniel 
Emory, Samuel E., Edward Otterbein, George C, Mary M. (Minnie). I 

6. Samuel (l83h - l86Li) Probably unmarried. ' 

Son of George 0. and Mary Ann Schuler. Bom in Dayton Twp., I-tontgomery Co., Ohio.' 
Farmer, near Ashmore and Westfield, 111., in Coles Co. 

5. Samuel (l839 - I839). Son of I-lartin Bortner (Burtner) and Sarah Ernst, Latimore Twp, 
Adams "Co., Pa. Sometimes erroneously called "Burtner". 



7. Samuel Coursey (185? - I889) Unmarried. 

Son of Rev. William H. and Perthena F, Paul. Farmer, near Mt. Clinton, Va. (Rock-*j 
ingham Co.). Injured and crippled in a farm accident when young. 



6. Samuel E. (cl862 - l862). Son of Daniel and Susan Rhinehart, Muscatine, Iowa. 

6. Samuel E. (l865 - 1865). Son of Samuel Jr. and Catharine May, Cumberland Co., Pa. 



8. Samuel Joshua Wyand (I896 - 1965) - m. Lena Kefauver (1902 - 

Son of Osceola W. and Katie Wyand. Born near Sharpsburg, Md. Farmer, near Williams 
port, Md. Retired in Hagerstown, Md. Veteran of World War I - U. S, krmy. Child- 
ren: George S. , Anna May (Evans), Rosalie K. (Stotler), John J. Widow lives in 
Hagerstown, Md. 

8. Samuel Logan (I88U - 1965) - m. Merla A. Walker (cl900 - 

Son of Thomas J. and Amanda Kingery. Born near Tuscola, 111. (Douglas Co.), Cook, 
Oakland, 111.; Terra Haute, Ind.; and Bloomington, Ind. (Indiana University). Also] 
lived for a few years, when young, near Miles City, Mont. Children: Richard Logan, ^ 
Bonnie Joan (Simpson-Rader). Widow lives in Bloomington, Ind. 

10. Samuel Richard (I95l - . Son of Richard L. and Rosella Thorpe, Bloomington, Ind. 
8. Scott Frederick (I9I18 - . Son of Richard H. and Fern E. Fromm, Temple, Pa, 
10. Shawn James (1963 - . Son of Richard A. and Jo Ann Rugier, Lowber, Pa. 

8. Sheldon Kephart (1900 - I96I4) - m. Ethel Shoemaker (I898 - 

Son of Rev. Newton Weldon and Ella M. Albert. Bank teller, Canal Winchester, Ohio. 
Veteran of World War I - U, S, Army, Children: Sheldon Kephart Jr., Barbara Lee 
(Hawk). Widow lives in Canal Winchester, Ohio. 

9. Sheldon Kephart Jr. (1928 - m. Joann Smith (1928 - 

Son of Sheldon K. and Ethel Shoemaker. Electronic engineer, North American Avia- 
tion, Columbus, Ohio. Lives in Canal Winchester, Ohio. Children: Sheldon Kephart 
III, James Scott, Janet M. , Eric A. 

10. Sheldon Kephart III (1955 - . Son of Sheldon K. and Joann Smith, Canal Winchester, ( 

25U 






PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER M ALES A ND THEI R FAMILIES 

9. Sherwin Marion (1935 - m. Mary Lou Huff (cl935 - 

Son of Marion M. and Pribble M. Given. Born in Gary, Ind. Oil -truck driver, near 
Staunton, Va. Children: Duane Alan, (Michael) Kent, Beth Ann. 

9. Simeon J. (I9I4I - . Son of James P. and Oneida Crawford, El Paso, Tex. 

6. Simon Peter (18^0 - l88U) Unmarried. 

Son of George 0. and Mary Ann Schuler. Born near Ashmore and Westfield, 111., in 
Coles Co. Farmer, near Tuscola, 111. (Douglas Co.). 

8. Snowden Orville (I883 - 1961i) - m. Sarah Josephine Lee (l882 - 1963) 

Son of Charles J. and Estelle F. Randolph. Born in Lamar, Mo. Carpenter, Kansas 
City, Kans. Children: Calla Lee (Hager), Herbert Eugene, Orville Leslie, Dale 
Kenneth. 

6. Solomon (182? - 189$) - m. Harriet Ann Dudley (I837 - 1915) 

Son of Rev. Henry and Margaret Statler, Born near Leitersburg, Md. (Washington Co.) 
Farmer, near Dayton, Va. (Rockingham Co.). In Confederate Army for a brief period 
in Civil War - 2nd Lieut., Co. A, lH6th Va. Militia. Children: Virginia Gertrude 
(Jennie - Pittman), Frances (Fannie), Anna Margarete (Hoffman-Schoedler), Johnson 
Ashby, Hattie N. (Peterson), Kate (Catharine ?) B. (Etter), Gertrude F. (Garber), 
Estella M. (Flick). 

9. Stanley Warren (193U - Unmarried 

Son of Walden M. and Myrle L. Harder. Partner (with father) in Burtner's Furniture 
Store, Yakima, Wash. 

Stephen (also see Steven) 

10. Stephen Allen (1963 - . Son of Otis S. and Dorothy L. Warren, near Lebanon, Ind. 
10. Steve Rbbert (1958 - . Son of Clifford E. and Anna M. Rothermel, Chicago, 111. 

9. Steven Craig (1957 - . Son of Robert R. Jr. and TheLna M. Killinger, Chamblee, Ga. 

10. Steven Jay (196O - . Son of Robert L. and Faye L. Troupe, near Frederick, Md. 

11. Steven Paul (I96I - . Adopted son of Gerald G. and Susan N. Edkin, New Orleans, La. 
10. Ted Robert (I96I - . Son of Robert E. and Jane L. Robards, Wasco, Calif. 

7. (Richard) Telford (I898 - cl9l8). Son of Albert G. and Joanna Creighton, Duquesne,Fa. 
10. (John) Templeton (1955 - . Son of Rev. Roger E. and Sylvia Creager, in Nigeria. 

9. Terry Lee (1957 - . Son of William L. and Phyllis J. Schell, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

9. (Charles) Thomas (1923- m. Mary Louise Placier (192U - 

Son of Clarence C. and Lucy D. Miller (Emery). Operating chemical engineer, Oak- 
land, 111. Also lived in Tuscola, 111, and San Antonio, Tex. Veteran of World War 
II - U. S. Air Corps. Children: Annette Louise (Duzan), (Charles) Thomas Jr., Timothy 
Ray. 

10. (Charles) Thomas Jr. (1953 - . Son of C. Thomas and Mary L. Placier, Oakland, 111. 

255 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAtHLIES 

7, Thomas Jefferson (l85l - 1936) - m. Amanda Kingery (1859 - 19U3) 

Son of Jacob L. and Malinda Hackett. Born near Ashmore and Westfield, 111. in Coif' 
Co. Farmer, near Tuscola, 111. (Douglas Co.) and near Miles City, Mont. Lived lat 
years in Oakland, 111. Children: Fanny Idella (Metz), (Conrad) Kenneth, Samuel 
Logan, Henry Thomas, Horace Perkins, Joseph Albert, Forest Edward, Clarence Clintcj 
Annie Elizabeth (Klamm), Fuller. 

9. Timothy Allen (1956 - . Son of Richard L. and Joanne L. Fennell, Youngstown, Ohio.^ 

10. Timothy Brent (1958 - . Son of William H. and Suzanne C. Hetzel, Bethesda, Md. 
10. Timothy Edwin (1953 - . Son of Rev. Roger E. and Sylvia Creager, in Nigeria. 
10. Timothy Ray (1958 - . Son of C. Thomas and Mary L. Placier, Oakland, 111. 

8. Timothy Vernon (19U8 - , Son of Vernon L. and Rose M. Shellhardt, St. Louis, Mo 

8. Timothy Warren (1953 - . Son of William F. Jr. and Lauretta L. Gumpp,New Kensington 

9. Todd Raymond (i960 - . Son of Richard L. and Joanne L. Fennell, Youngstown, Ohio 
8. Tyrone Richard (19U9 - . Son of Alfred F. and Anita M. Mattox, Temple, Pa. 



( 



1 



7. Vance Harold (1887 - m. Esther Cora Fredericka Anderson (l880 - 1963) 

Son of George A. and Mary E. Paules. Born in Churchtown (now Allen), Pa. (Cumber- i 

land Co.). Insurance agent, Osceola Mills, Pa. Previously lived in Kansas City, j 

Mo. and Berlin, Md. No children. t 

7. Vance Wesley (192U - m. Esther Elizabeth Hogg (1925 - 

Son of Forest H. and Mary L, Giles. Farmer, near Butler, Pa. Children: David 
Vance, Darrell Eugene, Duane Wesley, Darwin Mark. 

7. Vernon Laurel (1920 - m. Rose Marie Shellhardt (1925 - * 

Son of Forest H. and Mary L. Giles. Bom in Butler, Pa. Appliance repairman, 
St. Louis, Vo. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Air Corps - Sgt. Children: Gaye 
Arline, Timothy Vernon, Joy Marie, Sufaan Rae. ■* 

8. Walden Harp (192U - m. Katherine Downin (cl925 - 

Son of Jacob H. and Mary J. Friend. Farmer, near Keedysville, Md. Lives on father ># 
and grandfather's (Ezra's) homeplace. Children: Cassie, Jacquelin Sue, Nancy Frien*. 

8. Walden Markwood (1905 - m. Myrle Lucille Harder (1910 - * 

Son of Rev. Markwood Monroe and Margaret B. Reed. Born in Lowden, Wash. Owner, wit 
son, of Burtner's Furniture Store, Yakima, Wash. Also lived in Dufur and Coi^alli 
Ore. Children: Stanley Warren. *^ 



8. Walter (l873 - I878). Son of Benjamin F. and Mary Robertson, Douglas Co., 111. 



1 



9. Walter Garland (1902 - m. Eva I. Moore (1915 - 

Son of Walter S. and Mary Alice Rolison. Bom near Dudley, 111. (Edgar Co.). 
Machinist, Indianapolis and Lebanon, Ind . In U. S. Arny for four years between the^: 
wars. Children: Lowell Wayne, Louise Elaine. \ 

8. Walter Little (1897 - I898). Son of William H. Jr. and Martha J. Huffman, Harrison- » 
burg, Va. ! 

256 I 

i 



I 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AW THE I R FAMILIES 

8. Walter Preston (19U? - . Son of Paul S. and Jean P. Kuhn, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

7. Walter Russell (I89U - cl895). Son of Henry G. and Delia Irwin, Tarentum, Pa. 

8. Walter Sanford (1875 - 1958) - m. (1) (Maiy) Alice Rolison (I876 - 1918); (2) 

Fannie Myrtle Dunnigan (I888 - 1959). Son of George H. and Sarah C. Wilson. Born 
in Edgar Co., 111.; also lived for a few years in Kans. when young. Farmer, and 
railroad and construction laborer, in Edgar and Clark Cos., 111.; Custer Co., 
Okla.; and Boone Co., Ind. Lived in and around Zionsville and Lebanon, Ind. Child- 
ren: (l)Otto Orville, Walter Garland, Hobart Elmer, Faye Opal (Cooley), (Etta) May 
(Robbins), Ray Everett, Mary E. (Horn); (2) Edwin Earl, Edna Pearl (Shelly), George 
Russell, Lloyd Orval, Otis Sanford, Juanita Katherine(Hoggard-Myers), Jackie Lamar. 

10. Walter Sanford II (1957 - . Son of Jackie L. and Freda M. Colet(Hiriton), Thorn- 
town, Ind. 

7. (Charles) Walton (l879 - 1955) - m. Irene Charlson (I883 - 

Son of Hev. George Washington and Mary E. Steffey. Born in Woodbridge, Calif. 
Farmer, near Telia Bella, Calif. Children: (Charles) Walton Jr., Beatrice Jeanette 
(Bessey), Helen Muriel (Sanderson), Henry Milton. 

8. (Charles) Walton Jr. (1909 - m. Florence Alberta McCullough (1909 - 

Son of (Charles) Walton and Irene Charlson. Salesman and accountant, San Jose, 
Calif., where he was born. Children: Allan Charles, Douglas Milton. 

7. Warren Edward (1907 - m. Ruth Caroline Martin (I908 - 

Son of Rev. Edward 0. and Helen Rauch. Born in Mount Joy, Pa. (Lancaster Co.). 
Public-school teacher, Lykens, Palnyra, Allentown, Steelton, and Hummelstown, Pa. 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. Army Art. - Sgt. Children: Warren Edward Jr., 
John Henry. 

8. Warren Edward Jr. (1939 - 19Ul). Son of Warren E. and Ruth C. Martin, Hershey, Pa. 

7. Wendell Harmon (1925 - m. Marjorie Jean Christie (1930 - 

Son of Forest H. and Mary L. Giles. Born in Butler, Pa, Electrician, Eastman Kodak 
Co., Bochester, N. Y. Veteran of World War II- U. S. Army. Children; Robert Forest, 
Sharon Ann, Kevin Ralph, Patricia Dawn, Barbara Jean. 

7. Wesley (1882 - 1897). Son of William B. and Nancy B. Gray, in Missouri. 

8. (Otto) Whitmore (I908 - m. Nita Barrie (cl910 - 

Son of Rev. Otto W. and Ethel Bookwalter. Physician, Miami, Fla. Previously lived 
in Ansonia, Conn. No children. 

8. Wilbur Earl (l677 - 1951) - m. (l) Minnie Shawn (cl880 - 1910); (2) Edwina Scheer 
(cl880 - 1951). Son of Benjamin F. and Mary Robertson. Bom near Tuscola, 111. 
(Douglas Co.); also lived in Rockwall, Tex., when young. Farmer and landowner, 
near Chrisman, 111. (Edgar Co.) and Saginaw, Mich. No children. 

7. Wilbur Leroy (1902 - m. Cecilia Hiwiller (cl902 - 

Son of Henry G. and Delia Irwin. Born in Allegheny Co., Pa. Farmer, near Marwood, 
Pa. Children: Francis Ronald, Oliver Leo, Lois (Houston). 

257 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MA.IES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. Vlillard Homer (1928 - m. Nancy Mardell Rambo (19U3 - 

Son of Byard B. and Margaret G. Groan. Born in Gary, Ind. Musician; owns and oper> 
ates a night club, New Buffalo, Mich. Children: Bruce Bariy, Robin Lynn, Barbara Ann,i 

9. Willard Marvin (1911 - m. Bessie Parmer (cl911 - 

Son of Henry S. and Ethel Overman. Living in Muncie, Ind. Children: Robert M., 
Jean Marie (Jones), Judith Ann (Cox). 

U. William (cl802 - cl830) Probably unmarried. 

Son of John Bortner (Burtner) and Christina Emerich. Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa, 
Sometimes called "Burtner", although he probably did not change his name. 

U. William (l808 - l880) - m. Susannah (l8l5 - 1890) " 

Son of Peter Bortner and Elizabeth Wayne. Sometimes called "Burtner", although he 
retained "Bortner" name. Farmer, Franklin Twp., York Co., Pho Children: Levi, 
William, Amanda (Welty), Lydia Ann, Harriet. Sons changed name to "Burtner". 

S. William (1822 - 1893) - m. (l) Margaret Griner (cl823 - cl856): (2) Sarah (Griner ?). 
(cl8l7 - i860); (3) Eliza S. Hesselgesser (cl8U2 - l865). Son of Philip Bortner 
(Burtner) and Ellen Gallagher. Changed his name to "Burtner". Farmer in Buffalo 
Twp. (part later in Clinton Twp.), Butler Co., Pa. Children: Mary A. (Criswell), 
James, Sarah Ellen (Smalley), Emily (Westerman), William A.; (2) Margaret E.(Lardin) 
(3) Susanna (Annie - Mahan), Philip S. 

5. William (1833 - 1913) - m. (l) Barbara Gantz (l82l - 188?); (2) Martha Virginia 

(Jennie) Reid (l8l|8 - 1899). Son of George and Elizabeth . Bom in Franklin 

Twp., York Co., Pa. Farmer, Monroe Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. Children: (l) Freder-i| 
ick Gantz, George Addison, Mary C. (Sollenberger); (2) Hulda Estelle (Greegor), 
Calvin Reid, William Dorsey. 

il 

5. William (18U8 - 188?) Unmarried ^ 

Son of William Bortner (Burtner) and Susannah . Changed his name to "Burtner'V 

Lived in Franklin Twp., York Co., Pa. 

7. William (I883 - I960) - m. Delta Florence Price (I89O - 1959) t 

Son of James and Emma Drolinger. Born near Manhattan, Kans. Cattleman, Pegs, OklaJ 
Bayfield and Durango, Colo. Children: James Price, Philip, Richard Lee. 

6. William A. (cl856 - 1856). Son of William and Margaret Griner, Butler Co., Pa. 

10. William Anton (196? - . Son of Hbbert K. and Barbara K. Sennett, Torrance, Calif. 

6. William B. (l85h - 1929) - m. Nancy Barber Gray (l85l - 1899) 

Son of Andrew and Elizabeth Emerick. Born in Buffalo Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Coal 
miner, blacksmith, and farmer, in Morgan Co, and elsewhere in Mo.; Arkansas; and 
near Hooper, Colo. Died in Farmington, N. M. Children: Wesley, Gertrude (Moogan), 
Bffie (Ware-Morse), Etta (Dosher), Bessie (Rogers). 

7. William C. (l895 - cl9l8). Son of Albert G. and Joanna Creighton, Duquesne, Pa, 

258 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

6. William Dorsey (l897 - 1965) - m. Golda Dearmont (cl900 - 

Son of William and Virginia (Jennie) Reid. Born in Monroe Twp., Cumberland Co., Pa. 
and raised near Boyce, Va. (Clarke Co.). Onetime Treasurer of Clarke Co., Va. Also 
motel clerk, Winchester, Va. Children: William Gibson, Charles Allen. Widow lives 
in Winchester. 

10. William F. (1930 - m. (l) Shirley Jean Fields (1933 - 1957); (2) Mary Ann Briggers 
(cl935 - . Son of Ernest Yankee and Anna Mildred Burtner (daughter of James Albert 
Burtner and L. Maude Saiter). Changed his name to "Burtner'*. In U. S. Air Force, 
presently stationed at Richards-Gebaur A. F. B., Grandview, Mo. Children: (l) Carol 
Ann; (2) Laura, Lisa - - perhaps others, names unknown. 

6. William Franklin (1873 - 19U7) - m. Florence Wolford (cl880 - 

Son of George W. and Mary Ann Swartslander. Born in Fawn Twp., Allegheny Co,, Pa. 
Lived in and near Tarentum, Pa, (Allegheny Co.). Children: Betty (Hallden), 
William Franklin Jr., Gayle (McCurdy). Widow lives in Natrona, Pa. 

7. William Franklin Jr. (1925 - m. Lauretta Lou Gumpp (192U - 

Son of William F, and Florence Wolford. Born in Tarentum, Pa, (Allegheny Co.). 
Supervisor, Allegheny-Ludlum Research Center, New Kensington, Pa. (Westmoreland Co.) 
Veteran of World War II - U. S. krmy - Sgt. Children: William Franklin III, Timotiy 
Warren, Christopher Scott, Jennifer Ann, Jeffrey Alan. 

8. William Franklin III (19U7 - . Son of William F, Jr. and Lauretta L. Gumpp. 

7. William Gibson (1925 - m. Hazel Bell Brown (192U - 

Son of William D, and Golda Dearmont. Born in Winchester, Va. Painting contractor, 
Maitland, Fla. Veteran of World War II - U. S. Arny - Sgt. No children. 

6. William H. (1852 - 1906) - m. Theresa E. Deagle (l853 - 1933) 

Son of Peter and Helen (Dennis ?). Onetime traveling agent for a drug concern. 
Later executive in machine-tool companies. Lived in Cincinnati, Ohio. Children; 
William H. Jr. 

7. William H. Jr, (l873 - 1932) - m. Alice Muller (1875 - 19U3) 

Son of William H. and Theresa S, Deagle. Lawyer, Cincinnati, Ohio. No children. 

6. Rev. William Henry (I83U - I89I1) - m, Perthena Frances (Fannie) Paul (I838 - I898) 

Son of Rev. Henry and Margaret Statler. Born near Leitersburg, Md, (Washington Co.) 
Also lived near Dayton, Va. (Rockingham Co.) when young. Farmer and part-time 
minister in United Brethren Church, Mt. Clinton, Va. (Rockingham Co.). Children: 
Samuel Coursey, Luther Olin, Ada May (Childress), Newton Weldon, William Henry Jr., 
Ella, Homer Paul, Nora Etelka (Strickler), Otto Whitmore, Oren Llewellyn, Emma 
Lester, (Elmer) Edwin. 

7. William Henry (lQh9 - l8U9). Son of Jacob L. and Leah Evinger, Coles Co., 111. 

7. William Henry Jr. (I86I1 - 1933) - m. Martha Jane Huffman (I86I - 1920) 

Son of Rev. William Henry and Perthena F. Paul. Born in Mt. Clinton, Va, (Rocking- 
ham Co.) Farmer, near Harrisonburg, Va, Children: Virginia Mae, Roy Huffman, Tracie 
Etelka (Tietje), Edna Pearl, (Winton) Paul, William Olin, Walter Little, Elsie Ann 
(Farringer ), Charles Albert, Winifred Frances (Wanqsler), Beulah Kathryn. 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

9. William Henry Jr. (1931 - m. Suzanne C. Hetzel (1933 - J (2) Benita Jane Stout 
Son of David Ezra and Melrose Vance. Ass't. manager, Burtner Furniture Co, and 
partner in Greensboro Record Center, Greensboro, N, C. Children: (l) Richard Lee, 
Timotl^ Brent; (?) None. 



I 



William John (1899 - m. (l) Mable Irene Pinney (cl900 - ; (2) Sylvia Snith (Jone^j 
(1906 - . Son of Charles W, and Anna Cadwallader. Bom in Duquesne, Pa. (Allegheny' 
Co.). Steel-mill employee, Younpstown, Ohio. Now lives in Strothers, Ohio and 
Sarasota, Fla . No children. 



10. William Joseph (19UU - Unmarried. 

Son of Clifford E. and Anna M, Rothermel. Structural-steel -worker, Chicago, 111. 

7. William Larder (l893 - m. Helen Bullen (1902 - 

Son of Owen A. and Mary (May) B. Larder. Born in Brooklyn, N. Y. Stenographer, 
New York City Post Office. Lives in Staten Island, N. Y. Children: Audrey Mary, 
June Bell (Tanaskovic), John Paul, William Larder Jr., Mary Isabelle (Smith), 
Henry (Harry) Osmond, Helen Hope (Giordano), Arlene Barbara (Cutler). 

8. William Larder Jr. (1929 - m. Merrill Clady (1933 - 

Son of William L. and Helen Bullen. Patrolman, N. Y. City Police Dept. Lives in 
Staten Island, N. Y. Children: Brian William. 

8. William Lavern (1933 - m. Phyllis Jean Schell (1936 - 

Son of Paul S. and (Bertha) Rose Saphore. Born in Dillsburg, Pa. (York Co.). Ice- 
cream manufacturer, Annville and Mechanicsburg, Pa. Children: Terry Lee, David 
Alan, James Robert, Barbara Ann. 

7. William Loren (I867 - 19Ul) - m. Emma Foots (I867 - 1933) 

Son of Joseph P. and Elizabeth Campbell. Farmer, near West Alexandria, Ohio 
(Preble Co.), where he was born. Children: Albert Fouts, Robert Fouts, Dorothy 
Dean (Sweny), Frank Charles, Esther Elizabeth (Wolfe). 

10. William Lowell (I96I - o Son of Lowell D. and Juanita A. Hesselrodt, Keezletown,Va. 

8. William Olin (18 96 - m. l-Iarceline Guyneth Shinker (1908 - 

Son of William H. Jr. and Martha J. Huffman. Born in Harrisonburg, Va. (Rockinghara| 
Co.). Lawyer, U. S. Dept. of Justice, over 35 years. Now lives in Arlington, Va. 
and Harrisonburg, Va. Veteran of World War I - U. S, Navy. No children. 

6. William Otterbein (1827 - 1912) - m. Minerva Boyer Ennis (I828 - 1900) 

Son of George 0. and Mary Ann Schuler. Born in Cumberland Co., Pa.; also lived 
when young in Dayton Twp., Montgomery Co., Ohio. Farmer, near Dolson, 111. (Coles| 
Co.); Sargeant Twp., Douglas Co., 111.; and near Broadlands, 111. (in South Homer 
Twp., Chan5)aign Co.). Retired in Nevman, 111. Children: Alexander, Mary F. (Molly 
- Hurst), (Sarah) Elizabeth (Fidler), George Henry, William Otterbein Jr., John, 
Marion Andrew, Abraham Lincoln, Fannie (Sheppherd), Martha (Tucker-Stewart), Julia] 
Ann (Kirchner). 



260 



i 



PART C - REGISTER OF BURTNER MALES AND THEIR FAMILIES 

7. 'William Otterbein Jr. (185? - 1937) - m. Martha Ellen Wilson (I863 - 1957) 

Son of William 0. and Minerva B. Ennis. Born in Coles Co., 111.; also lived when 
young in Sargeant Twp., Douglas Co. and near Broadlands, 111. (in Champaign Co.). 
Farmer, near Allerton, 111. Children: Lillie Mae (Morris), Nellie Ethel. 

8. William Reed (1892 - m. Eleanor Cooper (cl895 - 

Son of Rev, Markvood Monroe and Margaret B. Reed. Bom in Littlestown, Pa.; also 
lived v/hen young in West Fairviev, Pa.; Rayville, Md.; Wasco, Ore.; Dufur, Ore.; 
Lowden and Bremerton, Wash. Machinist and watchmaker, Portland, Ore. Children: 
Dale Charles. 

7. William T. Hamilton (1873 - 1957) - m. Christina Morris (cl873 - cl92l) 

Son of Ezra and Sarah E. Harp. Born near Keedysville, Md. (Washington Co.). Barber, 
San Francisco, Calif. No children. 

8. William Thomas (1905 - m. Edna Mae Heller (1907 - 

Son of Rev. Newton Weldon and Ella M. Albert. Bom in Johnstown, Pa. Telephone 
company supervisor, Columbus, Bexler, and New Lexington, Winter sville, and Dayton, 
Ohio. Children: Mai-y Jane (Santee), William Thomas Jr. 

9. William Thomas Jr. (1938 - m. Rebecca L. Lannom (1937 - 

Son of William T. and Edna M. Heller. Born in Columbus, Ohio. Onetime teacher; 
now Managing Editor, National Managenent Association, Dayton, Ohio. Lives in 
Englewood, Ohio. No children. 



261 





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